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PS 321 Exceptional Children
Seybert, Linda


Parkville Campus Fall 2004
New Page 3

COURSE SYMBOL AND NUMBER: ED 321 (Tuesday and Thursday)

COURSE TITLE: Exceptional Children

COURSE DESCRIPTOR: Education

TERM COURSE BEING TAUGHT: Fall 2004

NAME OF FACULTY MEMBER: Linda Seybert, Ph.D.

TITLE OF FACULTY MEMBER: Associate Professor of Special Education

FACULTY OFFICE LOCATION: Copley, Room 315

FACULTY OFFICE HOURS: Mondays, 12:45 - 1:45 and 3:15 - 5:15, Tuesdays, 3:45 - 4:45;

and Thursdays, 1:15 - 2:15 and 3:45 - 4:45; OR by appointment

FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONE NUMBER: 816-584-6734

FACULTY PARK EMAIL ADDRESS: Linda.Seybert@Park.edu

OTHER FACULTY EMAIL ADDRESS: N/A

FACULTY WEB PAGE ADDRESS: http://captain.park.edu/seybert

DATES OF THE TERM: August 23 - December 10, 2004

CLASS SESSIONS DAYS: Tuesday and Thursday

CLASS SESSION TIME: 2:25 - 3:40

PREREQUISITE(S): PS 101 Introduction to Psychology OR ED 203 Educational

Psychology

CREDIT HOURS: 3

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

VISION STATEMENT

Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: A course designed to study the varied educational, developmental, and behavioral characteristics of children with special intellectual, physical, emotional, or social needs. This course includes completion of out-of-class experiences, such as visits to inclusion classrooms in area schools and home visits with families.

FACULTY’S EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY: The instructor’s educational philosophy is to encourage learners to interact with one another—to share knowledge, skills, experiences, thoughts, and beliefs—in a climate of mutual respect and appreciation of differences in order to enhance professional/personal knowledge and skills. A variety of instructional formats are utilized, including lectures, readings, quizzes, dialogues, examinations, Internet, videos, web sites, and writings, with the goal of motivating the learner to self-reflect and analyze how new/enhanced knowledge and skills can be applied to improve his/her future educational practices.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES: To provide future teachers with a foundation for…

Understanding political, philosophical and legal issues that influence special education practices (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act-IDEA) (MoSTEP 1.2.1);

Describing the characteristics of identified students with disabilities and understanding how these characteristics may impact student learning (MoSTEP 1.2.3);

Understanding the process of special education, including prereferral intervention, evaluation and identification, program planning, and placement of students with exceptionalities (MoSTEP 1.2.3.3, 1.2.8, and 1.2.10);

Being an active member of an assessment team by understanding what information is derived from different formal and informal assessment tools used in the process (MoSTEP 1.2.8 and 1.2.10);

Being an effective member of an IEP (Individualized Education Program) team (MoSTEP 1.2.3.3 and 1.2.10);

Understanding the role of the regular and special educator within the school system and how they work as a collaborative team (MoSTEP 1.2.3.3 and 1.2.10);

Being able to successfully include students with disabilities into an inclusive classroom using appropriate intervention, accommodations, and modifications for that student (MoSTEP 1.2.3); and

Being a reflective practitioner, who accesses, uses, and creates resources for personal and professional growth (MoSTEP 1.2.9).

COURSE TEXTBOOK(S):

Required Text: Heward, W. (2003). Exceptional children: An introduction to special education (7th ed.). Columbus, OH: Merrill Prentice Hall.

Note: Students are encouraged to use resource materials (e.g., "Chapter-at-a-Glance", "Essential Concepts") provided by the author and publisher, which may be accessed at (www.prenhall.com/heward).

Recommended Text (not required): American Psychological Association. (2001). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

ACADEMIC HONESTY: “Academic Honesty is required of all members of a learning community. Hence, Park will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers or other course assignments. Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from Park.”

PLAGIARISM: Plagiarism—the appropriation or imitation of the language or ideas of another person and presenting them as one’s original work—sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance. Students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their instructors.”

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Instructors are required to keep attendance records and report absences. The instructor may excuse absences for cogent reasons, but missed work must be made up within the term of enrollment. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of “F”. An Incomplete will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance (TA) or Veterans Administration (VA) educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student. Reports of F grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for students receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS: All assignments, even if late, are required to earn a grade for this course. Late assignments will result in the loss of points of 5% per day x total points possible of assignment (see page 8 for specific assignment point totals).

COURSE ASSESSMENT:

Oral/written assignments (Course Objectives 1 - 8)

Group discussions (Course Objectives 1 -8)

Exams (Course Objectives 1 - 8)

Case Studies (Course Objectives 2, 6, 7, & 8)

Exceptionality Project, with Rubric (Course Objectives 2, 4, 6, 7, & 8)

Field Experience (Course Objectives 2, 3, 6, 7, & 8)

Reflective Essays/Educational Philosophy (Course Objectives 8)

Resource Notebook, with Rubric (Course Objectives 1 - 8)

CLASSROOM RULES OF CONDUCT:

Students are expected to:

Attend class on a regular basis. Come to class on time.

Hand in assignments on time (see course map for specific due dates).

Take each exam when scheduled (see course map for specific due dates).

When submitting assignments (e.g., formatting, citations, references, etc.), follow APA guidelines provided in the Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (5th edition), (2002).

(See http://captain.park.edu/education/Resources/resources.htm for general info about APA guidelines).

Come to class prepared to participate in a meaningful way on the topic of the day.

Ask questions.

Listen respectfully to others’ points of view, comments, and presentations.

Support others’ success.

Follow academic regulations detailed in Park University's undergraduate catalog.

DISABILITY GUIDELINES: Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University’s policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University’s policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: www.park.edu/disability

Course Requirements:

Students are required to:

Read chapters/readings as assigned.

Complete a reflective essay on one's personal educational philosophy in regards to working with students with exceptionalities. The essay should be a self-reflection on the teacher's responsibility for creating success for ALL students, particularly those with exceptionalities. The essay should be 2-3 pages in length and follow APA's recommendations for formatting (e.g., 1" margins, double-spaced, 12-pt font).

Students may wish to reference the following information BEFORE writing their

personal educational philosophy:

· Missouri Standards for Teacher Education Programs (MoSTEP) – Standards 1.2.3, 1.2.4, 1.2.5, 1.2.6, and 1.2.7.

· Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) Code of Ethics for Educators of Persons with Exceptionalities (www.cec.sped.org/ps/code.html#1)

Heward, W. (2003). Postscript: Developing your own personal view of special education. In Exceptional children: An introduction to special education (pp. 607-609). Columbus, OH: Merrill Prentice Hall.

Complete three exams.

Locate, read, and summarize articles from journals or Internet sites related to current issues or challenges on topics as assigned. There are ten (10) articles summaries due over the course of the semester (refer to the syllabus course map for specific due dates).

Purpose: to keep current with professional literature related to key topics in working with exceptional students.

Each article summary must be comprised of four (4) key components, including the title of the article, a description of the article, summary of the key points presented in the article, and a reflection of what was learned. Except for the title, each part of the article should start with a heading. Specifically, the article summary should include the following:

Title (worth 20% of total points). The title of the article summary IS the APA citation of the article being summarized. Example: Lipsky, D.K., & Gartner, A. (1998). Taking inclusion into the future. Educational Leadership, 56(2), 78-81. Note: The title (i.e., citation) should appear on the first line of the first page with a left-flush alignment.

Description (worth 20% of total points). Describe the article's content.

Key points (worth 20% of total points). Discuss the key points and reasons why they are important.

Reflection (worth 40% of total points). Analyze, summarize, and reflect on how the information in the article has increased one's professional knowledge, skills, and/or dispositions to be an effective teacher.

Articles: Articles must be selected from professional educational journals or from key Internet web sites related to students with disabilities or exceptionalities. There are many “acceptable” professional educational journals related to students with disabilities, including TEACHING Exceptional Children, Exceptional Children, Journal of Learning Disabilities, Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, Learning Disabilities Quarterly, Intervention, Remedial and Special Education, Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, and Behavioral Disorders. Park's online library (www.park.edu/Library) is a very good source to access these types of key professional educational journals (Ebsco database for education). Although students are encouraged to conduct Internet searches for pertinent web sites that could serve as resource sites for the various topics and exceptionalities discussed in class, a few key internet/web sites related to chapters in your textbook are listed on the Http://www.prenhall.com/heward companion web site.

Note: a copy of the article must be turned in with the written summary. Please be

prepared to share information from article summaries with other members of the

class.

Complete one Field Experience, which may include:

an interview of a Special Education Teacher,

an interview of a Regular Education Teacher working in an inclusive classroom,

interview of a student with an exceptionality,

interview of a parent/caretaker of a child with an exceptionality or disability,

observation of a classroom experience involving students with disabilities (e.g., inclusive classroom, resource room, special classes at a special school, residential school, or home-or hospital-based instruction), OR

observation of an IEP meeting.

NOTE: Assure all people involved in an interview/observation that no identifying information about students/parents will be used in order to protect rights of privacy and confidentiality.

The purpose of the Field Experience is to learn/enrich one's knowledge and

understanding of professional dynamics in the education of children and youth with

exceptionalities. To complete assignment, students will…

Submitted interview questions OR observational key points to the instructor PRIOR to the interview or observation for Instructor approval (worth 20% of total points)

(Note: a copy of the pre-approved interview questions/observational key points should be attached to your written report);

Complete a 2-4 page written report that includes the following:

Summary of the interview or observation (worth 40% of total points) AND

Analysis and reflection of how the information learned can lead to being a more effective teacher (worth 40% of the total points).

Complete an Exceptionality Project. Individually or as a member of a peer team, students will…

choose (or be assigned) an area of exceptionality (Chapters 6 – 14). There are ten (10) different exceptionality topics (see Exceptionality Project Assignment Sheet for specific topics).

select, read, and analyze information on the chosen area of exceptionality from at least four (4) difference sources (one source may be the textbook)

summarize information on the exceptionality topic in a formal, written research paper. The research paper must include the following information:

Title Page

Introduction

Definition of exceptionality

Characteristics associated with the exceptionality

Prevalence

Types

Causes

Identification and Assessment

Treatment

Common Misconceptions

Instructional Approaches/Strategies (including appropriate instructional accommodations and modifications, technologies, auxiliary aids, etc.)

Current Issues

Key Resources for Professionals

Conclusion

References

The research paper must follow APA guidelines and be written in clear, grammatical English that reflects the expected proficiency level of a 300+-level-college student in regards to spelling, grammar, punctuation, composition, word usage, etc. Errors should be eliminated BEFORE the written paper is submitted for grading. Each section (e.g., Definition, Characteristics) of the research paper must be designed with a heading.

The written paper is due one (1) week after the presentation (see course map for specific due dates). EACH student will be responsible for submitting his/her own research paper, even if one may be working with a peer group. Students must submit two (2) copies of the paper--one of which will be kept by the Instructor for future reference and the other to be returned to the student with Instructor comments, along with a completed Rubric for the Exceptionality Project.

summarize the key information from the research paper (sections III - XIII from outline) in a 2-3 page "Fact Sheet" (e.g., Fact Sheet on Students with Learning Disabilities) for other students in the class for their Resource Notebook. The Fact Sheet should be prepared and ready to be handed out to class members on the day of the presentation. Note: If one is working with a peer group, they must work together to prepare one (1) Fact Sheet.

prepare an approximately 60-minute lesson/class presentation on one's assigned exceptionality, which covers the key informational components of the written research paper and Fact Sheet (see the course map for the specific presentation date). The presentation must:

Employ the PowerPoint software application

(Note: a copy of the PowerPoint presentation must be provided to the Instructor on the day of the presentation),

Demonstrate one's level of knowledge of the exceptionality,

Engage the audience (i.e., creative, interactive, interesting),

Must include at least one (1) learning activity to help engage the audience (more than one would be better), AND

Be professionally delivered (e.g., appropriate voice level, eye contact, body language, dress)

after completion of the exceptionality project, submit a 2-3 page reflection essay summarizing:

What went well

What needed to be improved

How you would change the project to make it better [e.g., the research & written report, fact sheet, presentation, collaboration efforts (if applicable), etc.]

The reflection essay must be attached to the written report submitted for grading.

Grading: The Exceptionality Project is worth 900 points. Specifically, the written paper is worth 50% of the total points (450 points); the Fact Sheet is worth 20% of the total points (180 points); and the lesson/oral presentation is worth 30% of the total points (270 points). See Rubric for the Exceptionality Project for more details.

Complete a Resource Notebook, which should organize and summarize resource information received during the course (e.g., article summaries, Fact Sheets, Exceptionality Project, etc.). As a class, a Resource Notebook Checklist will be developed and used to grade the completed Resource Notebook.

Tentative Course Map

Class

Session

Date

Topics/Assignments

1

Aug 24

Introductions

Review of Course Syllabus

Topic: Learning Styles/Preferences

2

Aug 26

Topic: Learning Styles/Preferences and Differentiated Instruction

3

Aug 31

Topic: Defining Special Education

Reading Assignment DUE: Chapter 1

4

Sept 2

Topic: Defining Special Education (continued)

5

Sept 7

NO CLASS - work on Exceptionality Project/Presentation

6

Sept 9

Topic: Special Education Services

Reading Assignment DUE: Chapter 2

7

Sept 14

Topic: Special Education Services (continued)

Article Summary #1 DUE: Topic = Inclusion

8

Sept 16

Topic: Inclusion

9

Sept 21

Topic: Special Education in a Culturally Diverse Society

Reading Assignment DUE: Chapter 3

Article Summary #2 DUE: Topic = Students with LEP/ESL

10

Sept 23

Topic: Parents and Families

Reading Assignment DUE: Chapter 4

11

Sept 28

Topic: Parents and Families (continued)

Article Summary #3 DUE: Topic = Working with Parents

12

Sept 30

Topic: Early Childhood Special Education

Reading Assignment DUE: Chapter 5

13

Oct 5

Topic: Learning Disabilities (LD)

Reading Assignment. Chapter 7

Group Discussion. “How Difficult Can This Be?” (The “Fat City” Workshop on video by Richard Lavoie)

Class

Session

Date

Topics/Assignments

14

Oct 7

Exam #1 over chapters 1 - 5

15

Oct 12

Topic: Learning Disabilities (continued)

Group Discussion: “How Difficult Can This Be?” (The “Fat City” Workshop on video by Richard Lavoie) – continued

Article Summary #4 DUE: Topic = LD

16

Oct 14

Topic: Learning Disabilities (continued)

Exceptionality Project Presentation: LD

Field Experience Project DUE

Week of October 18 - 22: Fall Recess - NO CLASSES

17

Oct 26

Topic: Attention-Deficient/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Exceptionality Project Presentation: ADHD

Article Summary #5 DUE: Topic = ADHD

18

Oct 28

Topic: Mental Retardation (MR)

Reading Assignment DUE: Chapter 6

Exceptionality Project Presentation: MR

19

Nov 2

Topic: Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (ED/BD)

Reading Assignment DUE: Chapter 8

Exceptionality Project Presentation: ED/BD

Article Summary #6 DUE: Topic = ED/BD

20

Nov 4

Topic: Communication Disorders (CD)

Reading Assignment DUE: Chapter 9

Exceptionality Project Presentation: CD

Article Summary #7 DUE: Topic = CD

21

Nov 9

Review of Chapters 6 - 9

Group Discussion: Study Strategies for Exam #2 (Take-Home)

Group Discussion: Rubric Development for Resource Notebook

 

Nov 11

Veterans Day Holiday - NO CLASSES

22

Nov 16

Topic: Hearing Loss (HL)

Reading Assignment DUE: Chapter 10

Exceptionality Project Presentation: HL

Exam #2 DUE

 

 

 

Class

Session

Date

Topics/Assignments

23

Nov 18

Topic: Blindness and Low Vision

Reading Assignment DUE: Chapter 11

Exceptionality Project Presentation: Blindness and Low Vision

Article Summary #8 DUE: Topic = Blindness & LV

24

Nov 23

Topic: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

Exceptionality Presentation: TBI

Article Summary #9 DUE: Topic = TBI

November 25 - 28: Thanksgiving Recess - NO CLASSES

25

Nov 30

Topic: Autism

Reading Assignment DUE: Chapter 13

Exceptionality Project Presentation: Autism

Educational Philosophy DUE

26

Dec 2

Topic: Giftedness and Talent (G & T)

Reading Assignment DUE: Chapter 14

Exceptionality Project Presentation: G & T

Article Summary #10 DUE: Topic = G & T

27

Dec 7

Topic: Transition to Adulthood

Reading Assignment DUE: Chapter 15

28

Dec 9

Topic: Resource Notebook

Resource Notebook DUE

Group Participation: Evaluation of Resource Notebooks

Preparation for Final Exam

 

December 13 - 17: FINAL EXAM WEEK

Final Exam: Thursday, December 16, 2004

1:00 – 3:00

 

 

Grading Plan:

The final grade will be based on the percentage of total points earned.

A = 90 – 100 % 2700 – 3000 points

B = 80 – 89 % 2400 – 2699 points

C = 70 – 79 % 2100 – 2399 points

D = 60 – 69% 1800 – 2099 points

F = 59% or lower 1799 points or less

Points may be earned as follows: Points

Attendance/Participation (5%) 140 (28 classes x 5 points/day)

Educational Philosophy (7%) 200

Exam 1, 2, and 3 (24%) 710 (Exam 1 = 150 pts, 2 = 225

pts, 3 = 335 pts)

Article summaries (15%) 450 (10 summaries x 45 points)

Field Experience (10%) 300

Exceptionality Project (30%) 900

Resource Notebook (10%) 300

TOTAL POINTS: 3000

 

Exceptionality Project Assignment Sheet

Date:

Exceptionality:

Chap:

Presenter(s):

Oct 25

Learning Disabilities

 

7

 

 

Oct 29

Attention-Deficit/

Hyperactivity Disorder

 

7

 

Nov 1

Mental Retardation

 

6

 

 

Nov 5

 

Emotional and Behavioral

Disorders

 

8

 

Nov 8

Communication Disorders

 

9

 

Nov 15

Hearing Loss

 

10

 

Nov 19

Blindness and Low Vision

 

11

 

Nov 22

Traumatic Brain Injury

 

12

 

Nov 29

Autism

 

13

 

Dec 3

Giftedness and Talent

 

14

 

Rubric for the Exceptionality Project

Name:_________________________ Evaluator: __________________

Rating Key: 6 = Excellent (100%) 5 = Very Good (90%) 4 = Good (80%)

3 = Average (70%) 2 = Needs Improvement (60%) 1 = Poor (50%)

0 = Not Present/No Evidence (0%) N/A = Not Applicable

Criteria:

Points

Possible

Rating

Points

Earned

Written Report

Title Page (title, student name, course, date)

10

   
Introduction

20

   
Definition of exceptionality

20

   
Characteristics of exceptionality

20

   
Prevalence of exceptionality

20

   
Types

20

   
Causes

20

   
Identification and assessment

20

   
Treatment

20

   
Common misconceptions

20

   
Instructional/teaching strategies to promote learning in the regular classroom

·academic supports (e.g., accommodations,

technology, auxiliary aids)

70

   
Current Issues

20

   
Key resources for professionals

40

   
Conclusion

20

   
References

20

   
Quality (i.e., APA format, well-written)

45

   
Self-reflective essay

45

   

Fact

Sheet

Knowledge (i.e., key info from sections III-XIII)

90

   
Organization (e.g., easy-to-follow, locate info)

45

   
Helpful/Beneficial

45

   

Oral Presentation

Knowledgeable (i.e., knows subject)

90

   
PowerPoint (copy provided to Instructor)

70

   
Engagement (i.e., creative, interactive, interesting)

60

   
Delivery (e.g., voice level, eye contact, body lang.)

50

   

Total:

900

   

Comments (may also use back of page for additional comments):

 

 

 

Exceptionality Project = 900 points (Written Paper = 50% = 450 points; Fact Sheet = 20% = 180 points; and Oral Presentation = 30% = 270 points)

GRADING PLAN: