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ED 575 Curr & Assess Early Child Ed I
Choi, Dong Hwa


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

ED 575 Curr & Assess Early Child Ed I

Semester

F1P 2008 EDD

Faculty

Choi, Dong Hwa

Title

Assistant Professor

Degrees/Certificates

Ph. D

Office Location

Downtown

Office Hours

M: Noon-5 pm T: Noon-5 pm W: Noon-4 pm

Daytime Phone

816-559-5604

E-Mail

dong.choi@park.edu

Semester Dates

August 18-October 12

Class Days

--T----

Class Time

5:00 - 9:30 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 

Textbooks:

1.  DeVries, R., Zan, B., Hildebrandt C., Edmiaston, R., & Sales, C.  (2002).  Developing constructivist early childhood curriculum: Practical principles and activities.  NY: Teachers College Press. ISBN: 0-8077-4120-5 (paperback)

 2.  C. Edwards, L. Gandini, & G. Forman (Eds.)The hundred languages of children: The Reggio Emilia approach – Advanced reflections.  Westport, CT: Ablex Publishing. ISBN: 156-750-311x (paperback)

3.  V. R. Fu, A. J. Stremmel, & L. T. Hill (Eds.)  Teaching and learning: Collaborative exploration of the Reggio Emilia approach.  (paperback)Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall.  ISBN: 0130287830

4. Gandini, L., & Edwards, C. P. (Eds.) Bambini: The Italian approach to infant/toddler care. Teachers College Columbia University, New York, NY 10027. ISBN 0-8077-4008-X

5. Hendrick, J (Ed.) First steps toward teaching the Reggio way. Prentice-Hall. Inc. ISBN 0-13-437302-2

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

Additional Resources:

Edwards (2002). Three approaches from Europe: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia. Early Childhood Research and Practice, 4(1) http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v4n1/edwards.html

New, R. (1999). What should children learn? Making choices and taking chances. Early Childhood Research and Practice, 1 (2) http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v1n2/new.html

Edwards, C., Churchill, S., Gabriel, M., Heaton, R., Jones-Branch, J., Marvin, C., & Rupeper, M. (2007). Students learn about documentation throughout their teacher education program. Early Childhood Research and Practice, 9(2)http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v9n2/edwards.html

Spaggiari, S. (2004). The path toward knowledge: The social political and cultural context of the Reggio municipal infant-toddler center and preschool experience.

MacDonald, B. (2004). Our Montessori journey with Reggio: Living with paradox and dualities. Innovation in Early Education

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
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Course Description:
ED575 Curriculum and Assessment in Early Childhood Education I: This course explores historical foundations and current approaches to early childhood curriculum and assessment. Theoretical perspectives will be examined. 3 cr.

Educational Philosophy:
Developing as a teacher is a complex process that occurs most effectively in learning communities that provide rich opportunities for inquiry and reflection, and that cultivate a sense of curiosity, integrity, social justice, and professionalism.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe historical and contemporary tensions in approaches to curriculum and assessment in education in the United States.
  2. Analyze and evaluate contemporary approaches to curriculum and assessment in early childhood education.
  3. Synthesize approaches and refine personal philosophical framework for curriculum and assessment.


Core Assessment:

Class Assessment:
 

I. Weekly Reflection (Due: August 26, Sept. 2, Sept. 9, Sept. 16, Sept. 23, Sept 30) (78 pts)

The purpose of the weekly reflection is to encourage a synthesis about the thinking of various authors and to promote a reflective stance on the part of the reader. Readings should be specifically referenced with a well-developed discussion of the provocations the authors are providing to your own thinking. Journals should be submitted weekly for a total of 6  entries for the session. (NAEYC Standards 1, 3, 4, 5; Professional Tools 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8).

2.       Teacher Inquiry. Core Assessment (132 pts)

Based upon readings and discussion, conduct an in-depth critical analysis of the influences affecting the approach to curriculum and assessment in the program/school in which you currently teach (or work in some other capacity as director, education coordinator, etc.)   (Objective 2)

A. Teacher inquiry #1 (45 pts) & Class PP presentation (21 pts) (Due: Sept. 16)

 

1. Select one or two area(s) in the following areas of teaching-learning processes for the project. The inquiry process will include gathering “traces” related to the question, reflecting on the relationship of the material to the question, deliberating with peers about the significance of the material and defining possible next steps, and developing understandings of the complexity of a particular educational setting.

a) Curriculum: Planning and preparation curriculum, children’ learning activities and interests, daily schedule, or use of materials

b) Relationships: children, parents, colleagues, director, community, environment

c) School environment: classroom environment, outdoor environment, use of nature

d) Assessment: observation, documentation, portfolio, standards

2. You will begin by identifying a compelling question from your teaching and relevant to the content of the course about the area(s) that you select. The following are examples of how your teaching evolves using the Reggio Emilia approach.

a) How do I create an environment of respect and rapport with students?

b) How do I prepare activities or learning experience for children?  

c) How do I manage daily schedules or classroom procedures?

d) How do I assess or document children’s learning?  

e) How do I communicate with children or his/her family?

3. After you investigate your teaching, prepare 1) Teacher Inquiry #1 Report and 2) PowerPoint presentation for the class.

1) Write a report paper. In your report, include the components as follows. Site the resources or references (3-4) you use in your paper. Paper should be 6-7 pages in length and double space, 12 font size letter. (45 pts)

Ø      School name and location

Ø      Your topic

Ø      Analyze your performance in the area(s) you have selected. For this analysis, you can use your self-reflective observation data to describe your previous performances and how your performances have evolved using the RE. (Comparisons of your previous performances vs. Current performance) 

Ø      Describe what you have observed about your teaching and evaluate or reflect on them using your educational beliefs, philosophies, and opinions. 

Ø      Benefits vs. challenges: Describe benefits of applying the RE approach in your teaching. Also, discuss what challenges you have experienced during the project.

Ø      Use references.

2) Prepare a PowerPoint presentation for the class.  (21 pts)

Your inquiry should be presented as a documentation of the process, including anecdotal records or work samples collected from your work with children, and reflections written during the course of your investigation. You can present the components in your paper to the class through the PP presentation. Make your presentation clear to your classmates in order to explain what you have learned about applying the Reggio to your program.

Ø      If you are allowed to take pictures or videotape of the class, use the data or resources as visual aides. Visual aides are powerful tools for communication.

 

B. Teacher Inquiry #2 (45 pts) & Class PP presentation (21 pts) (Due: Oct. 7)

Complete the identical assignment described in the same area of teaching-learning processes for 7-8 weeks.

Grading:
 

A=100-90%

B=89-80%

      C=79-70%

Late Submission of Course Materials:
 

·   All assignments should be typed. No handwritten assignment will be accepted.

·   All assignments must be turned in on the dates indicated, unless date is changed by instructor.

·   Late assignments will result in 20% reduction of the student’s point total for that assignment.

·   When student submits assignments after due date, you will have one more opportunity to submit the assignments. You can submit the assignment one week after the due date. That means when we meet in class in the following week of the due date, you can submit the assignment. After the second opportunity is passed, I will NOT accept any late submission.

·   Any absence does not excuse students’ responsibility to get assignments turned in on or before due day.

·   Extreme emergency absences and/or due date situation will be handled case by case at the instructor’s discretion. Instructor’s decision is final. Keep instructor informed of any potential personal situations that might necessitate an absence. 

·   The above procedures and calendar (given in class) for this course are tentative and subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances. I reserve the right and responsibility to evaluate the quality of your work. Completion of an assignment does not guarantee the awarding of all possible points.

·   If a student is absent for any reason, the student is still responsible for the information discussed in class that day.

·   For your own protection, always save a copy of any assignment you complete.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

Session 1

Introduction

August 19

**Presentation by the course instructor

Session 2

Curriculum & Assessment : Constructivism

August 26

Readings:

**DeVries, R., Zan, B., Hildebrandt C., Edmiaston, R., & Sales, C. (2002). Developing constructivist early childhood curriculum: Practical principles and activities. pp. 3-67

Session 3

Infants/ Toddlers Care in Reggio Emilia

 

 

 

 

September 2

Readings:

** Gandini, L., & Edwards, C. P. (Eds.) Bambini: The Italian approach to infant/toddler care. pp. 15-45 & pp. 49-66

** Spaggiari, S. (2004). The path toward knowledge: The social political and cultural context of the Reggio municipal infant-toddler center and preschool experience.

Session 4

Reggio Emilia in Italy

September 9

Readings:

** Edwards, C. (1998). Partner, nurturer, and guide: The role of the teacher. In C. Edwards, L. Gandini, & G. Forman (Eds.). The hundred languages of children: The Reggio Emilia approach – Advanced reflections. Westport, CT: Ablex Publishing, pp. 179-198.

** Edwards (2002). Three approaches from Europe: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia.

Early Childhood Research and Practice, http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v4n1/edwards.html

**Katz, L. G. (1998). What can we learn from Reggio Emilia? In C. Edwards, L. Gandini, & G. Forman (Eds.), the hundred languages of children: The Reggio Emilia approach – Advanced reflections. Westport, CT: Ablex Publishing, pp. 27-45.

 

Session 5

The child in society

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 16

** Presentation 1 : Teacher inquiry #1

Readings:

**Nimmo, J. (1998). The child in community: Constraints from the early childhood lore. In C. Edwards, L. Gandini, & G. Forman (Eds.). The hundred languages of children: The Reggio Emilia approach – Advanced reflections. Westport, CT: Ablex Publishing, pp. 295-312.

 

**Shafer, A. (2002). Ordinary moments, extraordinary possibilities. In V. R. Fu, A. J. Stremmel, & L. T. Hill (Eds.) Teaching and learning: Collaborative exploration of the Reggio Emilia approach. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall, pp.183-195.

**Oken-Wright, P, & Gravett, M. (2002). In V. R. Fu, A. J. Stremmel, & L. T. Hill (Eds.) Teaching and learning: Collaborative exploration of the Reggio Emilia approach. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall, pp.197-220.

 

Session 6

Reggio Emilia approach in US

September 23

Readings:

** Horm-Wingerd, D. M. (2002). The Reggio Emilia approach and accountability assessment in the United States. In V. R. Fu, A. J. Stremmel, & L. T. Hill (Eds.) Teaching and learning: Collaborative exploration of the Reggio Emilia approach. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall, pp. 51-65.

** Haigh, K (1997). How the Reggio Approach has influenced an inner-city program: Exploring Reggio in Head Start and subsidized child care. In Hendrick, J (Ed.) First steps toward teaching the Reggio way. Prentice-Hall. Inc. pp. 152-166

 

** MacDonald, B. (2004) Our Montessori journey with Reggio: Living with paradox and dualities. Innovation in Early Education

Session 7

Documentation

September 30

Readings:

** New, R. (1999). What should children learn? Making choices and taking chances. Early Childhood Research and Practice, 1, 1-18. http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v1n2/new.html

** Gandini, L., & Edwards, C. P. (Eds.) Bambini: The Italian approach to infant/toddler care. pp. 124-145. 

** Edwards, C., Churchill, S., Gabriel, M., Heaton, R., Jones-Branch, J., Marvin, C., & Rupeper, M. (2007). Students learn about documentation throughout their teacher education program. Early Childhood Research and Practice, http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v9n2/edwards.html

Session 8

Reflections on Teacher Inquiry

October 7

**Presentation II : Teacher inquiry #2

 

Type text here

Academic Honesty:
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Plagiarism:

Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct.  Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2008-2009 Graduate Catalog Page 25


Attendance Policy:

Professors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences for two successive weeks, without approved excuse, will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Executive Director for the Graduate School, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2008-2009 Graduate Catalog Page 29

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

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Last Updated:8/25/2008 3:20:27 PM