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CJ 220 Criminal Justice & the Community
Graves, Scott


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CJ 220 Criminal Justice and Community

Semester

F2B 2008 BL

Faculty

Graves, Scott W.

Title

Senior Instructor/Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

BS, MA

Office Hours

By appointment

Daytime Phone

915-564-5803 Ext. 645

E-Mail

Scott.Graves@park.edu

desertfox_84@yahoo.com

scottg@nmsu.edu

Semester Dates

October 13-December 3rd, 2008 (Fall 2, 2008)

Class Days

-M-W---

Class Time

7:40 - 10:10 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
The Police and The Community, 7th ed, Carter, David L. ISBN 0-13-041063-2

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Additional Resources:
To be distributed in class

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
Programming techniques for benefiting the agency-citizen relationship.  Emphasis is placed on utilizing the resources of the criminal justice agencies to engage in effective conflict resolution with citizens, develop citizen and agency awareness, community crime prevention and community relations.  3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
The facilitator's educational philosophy is one of interactiveness based on lectures, current events, class project and presentation, quizzes, and class discussions a mid-term and final examination. The emphasis is on the exploration of ideas and issues confronting the modern criminal justice system in society.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain the history and evolution of American policing, while examining the development of community-oriented government.
  2. Analyze the future potential of the COPPS philosophy for the elements of the criminal justice system.
  3. Apply the philosophy of Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving (COPPS) and the concomitant issues of training, agency implementation, and evaluation that accompany the philosophy.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. . identify various services provided to communities by the criminal justice system
  2. distinguish between traditional policing and community policing
Core Assessment:


  • Class participation, quizzes & exams


  • Exams


  • Papers, presentations, group &/or individual activities with written assignments (see CJ205)

Class Assessment:

The course is conducted primarily in English, which requires the student to be proficient in reading and writing the English language at the college level.
 
Term Paper Topic and Instructions:
 
Topic: Research one of the following:
 
1. an existing police sponsored community-oriented program or strategy that is implemented or supported by the agency you are reviewing.
2. an existing community reintegration program sponsored by a community corrections agency.
3. an existing community justice program or strategy as implented by the local court system in El Paso.
 
The student must select an agency for review and have the selection approved by the instructor to insure diversity of departments, probation/parole, or courts selected.
 
The term paper will be written in English and in the APA format. An exact sample of the required format is posted at parkonline.org in the DOC sharing tab. The paper will be five pages in length, excluding the cover and reference page, double spaced, 12 font, Times New Roman. The paper will contain five references from credible library sources and obtained from Park University's online library resources. Students must run their "spell checker" and edit their paper for spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors prior to submitting the paper.
 
All papers will be submitted on parkonline.org in the provided "dropbox" where the paper can be uploaded in MS Word format.
 
When possible, the student will complete quizzes online at parkonline.org 
          
Final Exam-Chapters 1-17 (150 points)
Research Paper Four Pages, Excluding cover and reerence pages (150 points)
Presentation  x 5  (50 points)        
Quizzes x 8 (80 points)
Attendance x   points per session (48 points)
 
TOTAL POSSIBLE POINTS:  478

Grading:

 
TOTAL POSSIBLE POINTS:  560
 
430 to 478  points = A
382 to 429 points = B
334 to 428 points = C
286 to 333 points = D
Below 286 points  = F
 

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Work missed because of absences or work turned in late will not be accepted.  It is your responsibility to meet deadlines and turn in work when it's due. Military students can make alternative arrangements with the instructor because of deployments or other unforeseen military duties that often arise. Park University specializes in serving military students and accomodations will be made to help the soldier, marine, airman, or sailor complete the course successfully.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Academic Honesty is required as per Park University Policy. All absences in excess of two, excused or unexcused, will result in a letter grade deduction from your final score.  Absences related to military duty will require leveling work as assigned by the instructor and the absences must be approved in advance.
 
Military students can make alternative arrangements with the instructor because of deployments or other unforeseen military duties that often arise. Park University specializes in serving military students and accomodations will be made to help the soldier, marine, airman, or sailor complete the course successfully.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

The below schedule consists of the meetings and target topics, as well as a schedule of course work and anticipated due dates. 
 
Week One: Monday October 13
1-Introduction, Chapter 1 Foundation and fundamentals. Discussion of the contemporary framework of policing, police approaches and public perceptions. Review of syllabus and requirements. Discussion of course project and other course work and expectations.     
 
Focus will be placed on:
Criminal Justice and Social Justice
What is Community?
Understand Community Justice within Traditional Criminal Justice Functions:
Police, Courts, and Corrections
 
 
Wednesday October 15
2-Class Admin, Chapter 2 ,Concept of Community. Discussion of community and the importance of police towards the community, as well as the community towards the police. Discussion of course project and other course work and assignments, to include due dates. The Prinicples offered by Sir Robert Peel will be central to the lecture and the course in general. Diuscussion of expectation of examinations and quizzes.    
 
Week Two: Monday October 20
1-Class Admin, Chapter 3 Fundamentals of CP, Discussion of central principles and tenets of community policing as well as the important thinkers in thhe field.  What is community policing? Why should communities embrace the thinking and philosophy of community policing?  Class current event articles and concomitant discussions and associations.  QUIZ ONE ON CHAPTERS 1-2. PRESENTATION ONE: Students will bring in an article demonstrating a community policing program to present and discuss with the class.  
 
Focus will be placed on:
Explain the philosophy of community policing as distinguished from community relations. Illustrate the elements necessary to make community policing successful.
Provide an overview of the rationale of community relations for community policing.
 
Wednesday October 22
2-Class Admin, Chapter 4 Ethics & Police, Lecture and discussion regarding ethical perspectives and a self-examination of personal ethics by the student and instructor. The importancce of maintaining an ethical "toolbox" and framework within which the student can analyze situations to determine ethical positions and actions. The student will develop the ability to apply ethics in real world situations. Class current event articles and concomitant discussions and associations. QUIZ TWO ON CHAPTERS 3-4.
 
Week Three: Monday October 27
1-Class Admin, Chapter 5 Police Role Dilemma. How do the police function as citizens within the community as well as serve in the role of "rule enforcer?" What can police officers do to approach and resolve common dilemmas inherent in the profession and maintain a constant and ethical presence in the community?  Class current event articles and concomitant discussions and associations.  PRESENTATION TWO: Students will bring in an article demonstrating a police ethics concern to present and discuss with the class. 
 
Focus will be placed on:
Examine Problem-Oriented Strategies and Police as a function of Power in Society.
 
Wednesday October 29
2-Class Admin, Chapter 6 Professionalism. Trade or profession? How have past thinkers worked to form policing into a profession that is founded upon a code of ethics and standardized practices. Or is law enforceent simply a trade that has no need to professionalize. Class current event articles and concomitant discussions and associations. QUIZ THREE ON CHAPTERS 5-6
 
Week Four: Monday November 3
1-Chapter 7 Police Discretion. Discretion in law enforcement is inescapable. How do officers decide when to make arrests and enforce the law? How do police maintain impartiality toward the law while prudently exercising discretion?  Class current event articles and concomitant discussions and associations. PRESENTATION THREE: Students will bring in an article demonstrating an instance of the use of police discretion (good or bad) to present and discuss with the class.
 
Focus will be placed on: 
Explaining how the courts work
Examining community courts  and a look at the Community and the Court.
 
Wednesday November 5
2-Class Admin, Chapter 8&9 Police Self & Public Image. An examination of police officer self-perception and how that changes over time. An examination of the public perception of police and the changes that have occurred and the evolution of such over time. Image management is a central concern for law enforcement administrators. Class current event articles and concomitant discussions and associations. QUIZ FOUR ON CHAPTERS 7-8.
 
Week Five: Monday November 10
1-Class Admin, Chapters 1-9 Class current event articles and concomitant discussions and associations.  PRESENTATION FOUR: Students will bring in an article demonstrating a public perception of the police (good or bad) to present and discuss with the class. 
 
Focus will be placed on: 
Review of Community Court
Examine community prosecution
Learn about Drug Courts
Learn about Domestic-Violence Courts
 
Wednesday November 12: ROUGH DRAFT OF TERM PAPER DUE THIS SESSION.
2-Class Admin, Chapter 10 Perception & Values. A discussion of Fritz Heider and the mechanism of perception combined with an examination of value sets in a cultural context.   
Class current event articles and concomitant discussions and associations. QUIZ FIVE ON CHAPTERS 9-10.
 
Week Six: Monday November 17
1-Class Admin, Chapter 12 & 13 Violence & Deadly Force. Perhaps no other subject arouses public concern as that of the use of police force. This class will be sspent examining the use of police force and an explanation of the legal framework that supports the use of force. The community perspective of usage of police force is reviewed through the lenses of Sir Robert Peel's applicable principles. Class current event articles and concomitant discussions and associations. QUIZ SIX ON CHAPTERS 12-13.
 
Focus will be placed on:
Examine Punishment and corrections 
Discuss correctional partnerships  
Provide an overview of the jails and prisons
Discuss impact of correctional facilities in the community
 
Wednesday November 19
2-Class Admin, Chapter 14 & 15  Complaints Issues. Class current event articles and concomitant discussions and associations. QUIZ SEVEN ON CHAPTERS 14-15. PRESENTATION FIVE: Students will bring in an article explaining or highlighting a police oversight commission to present and discuss with the class. 
 
Week Seven: Monday November 24
1-Class Admin, Chapter 17 Look at the Future. Class current event articles and concomitant discussions and associations. QUIZ EIGHT ON CHAPTERS 16-17.
 
Focus will be placed on: 
Review Community Corrections and probation and parole
Examine prison issues
 
Wednesday November 26
2-Class Admin, Presentations, Final Exam Guide & Review handed out in class. Class current event articles and concomitant discussions and associations.  
 
Week Eight:
Monday December 1st: FINAL DRAFT OF TERM PAPER DUE THIS SESSION.
1-Comprehensive Final Exam on Chapters 1-17.  
 
Focus will be placed on: 
Identify models of Community Justice
Discuss issues in future community justice
Review operational and management issues
 
Wednesday December 3rd
2-Feedeback Session, review of students' final grade.
 
*Exam review schedule subject to change videos will be added as time allows

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90
Absences in excess of two will result in a letter grade deduction from the student's final grade, whether excused or unexcused.  
Work missed through any absence must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
Absences resulting from military duty must be made known in advance and leveling work may be assigned as needed by the instructor.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:

This material is copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:9/22/2008 1:54:58 PM