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EDU 210 The School as a Social System
Wolf, Amy


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

EDU 210 The School as a Social System

Semester

SP 2009 HO

Faculty

Wolf, Amy

Title

Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Early Childhood Education

Degrees/Certificates

Interdisciplinary Ph.D. Early Childhood Education and Sociology
M.A. Human Development and Family Studies: Emphasis Early Childhood Education, Higher Education, and Administration
B.S. Human Development and Family Studies; Emphasis: Children in Group Settings

Office Location

Copley 320

Office Hours

On-line/Virtual Office Hours CST: Wednesdays 9 p.m.-10 p.m. and Thursdays 11:30-1 p.m., Face to Face office hours: Tuesdays: 11:30-2

Daytime Phone

816-590-8282

Other Phone

816-590-8282 (cell or text) 913-432-7803 (home)

E-Mail

amy.wolf@park.edu

Semester Dates

January 13, 2009-May 5, 2009

Class Days

--T-R--

Class Time

10:10 - 11:25 AM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 

Ornstein, A. & Levine, D. (2008). Foundations of Education, 10th ed. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.
  

Required: All students seeking teacher certification and licensure must purchase Foliotek, the School for Education electronic portfolio system. Purchasing information will be distributed within the first two weeks of the semester.

 

http://www.abcte.org/teach/missouri

https://missouristate.edu/certification/54121.htm

http://capwiz.com/nea/mo/issues/alert/?alertid=11218981

http://www.krcg.com/news/news_story.aspx?id=129150

 http://dese.mo.gov/
 

http://www.nea.org/vouchers/index.html

http://eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/custom/portlets/recordDetails/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=ED463928&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED463928

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2002/06/28/scotus-qna.htm

http://www.psparents.net/school_vouchers.htm

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1853532

http://forum.wgbh.org/wgbh/forum.php?lecture_id=1691

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desegregation_busing

http://www.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa-298.html
 
   http://www.naeyc.org/about/positions/pseth98.asp

http://www.nea.org/aboutnea/code.html

http://lrs.ed.uiuc.edu/students/bweinert/304code.htm
 

http://video.msn.com/?mkt=en-us&brand=msnbc&vid=8e7ee269-85e6-494d-a9db-9b8d45cf172b&from=00

http://www.ed.gov/pubs/urban hope 

http://www.kcmsd.net/schools/home3.asp?schoolid=78
 
 
 

Finland http://virtual.finland.fi/Education_Research/

South Korea: http://eng.kedi.re.kr (Click on Education in Korea Tab. Click on General Information. (There is a video you can watch J.)

Netherlands: http://www.minocw.nl/english/index.html

UK: http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/index.htm

New Zealand: http://www.minedu.govt.nz

Norway: http://www.norway.org/education/norwaysschoolsystem/general/mariannetest.htm

 
 

Additional Resources:

May use for presentation:  
http://www.ednews.org/
http://www.gao.gov (search GAO-03631; and Rebell & Hunter, Highly Qualified Teachers in PHI DELTA KAPPAN May 2004
http://www.educationnext.org
http://www.epaa.asu.edu
http://www.aft.org/research/vouchers
http://aera.net/pubs/er

.DeVries, R. and Kohlberg, L. (1987). Constructivist ealry education: Overview and comparison with other programs. Washington, DC: NAEYC.

Kotulak, R. (1997). Inside the brain: Revolutionary discoveries of how the mind works. Kansas City: Andrews McNeel Publishing.

Morrison, G. (2006). Teaching in America, 4th ed. Boston: Pearson

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
EDU210 (MGE): The School as a Social System: A survey of the historical, philosophical and legal foundations of American education. Also a study of the various school systems in the United States. Selected educational problems, issues and practices will be examined in light of current social conditions.3:0:3.

Educational Philosophy:
 

The professor draws from Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, in that it is important to allow for diverse learning styles in all classrooms. Further, she believes in the fact that individuals learn through collaboration and construction of their own knowledge. In other words the professor draws heavily from theorists such as Dewey, Vygotsky, Piaget, Bruner to name a few. The professor provides time to share personal experiences and ideas to understand multiple perspectives.

The class is organized in the style of a seminar including techniques such as: in-class dialogue, demonstration, discussion board, observation, library/internet research, collaborative group projects and oral presentations.  

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify, describe, and explain key concepts related to the USA's historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in the field of education.
  2. Develop a comprehensive synthesis on the cultural context of education by focusing on teachers and learners, teachers and teaching, students and schools, and schools and society.
  3. Define, describe, and analyze five or more critical issues of diversity in schools.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and effective use of professional literature in the field of education.
  5. Examine the teaching profession through personal reflections and by engaging in thoughtful discussions with peers.
  6. Write a personal philosophy of education grounded in six or more beliefs, supported by three or more evidenced-based theories, which are also tied to best practice within the field of education.
  7. Demonstrate a thorough applied knowledge on the concepts and operations of electronic assessment and portfolio systems.


Core Assessment:

All Park University courses must include a core assessment that measures the relevant Core Learning Outcomes. The purpose of this assessment is to determine if expectations have been met concerning mastery of learning outcomes across all instructional modalities.  The core assessment for this course is the philosophy of education.  The philosophy will be developed throughout the course and completed at the end of the 4th module. (200 points)  While this activity is required, its weight related to the grade computation is to be at least 20% of the total grade for the course.  (Rubric Attached) {Assesses outcomes 1, 2, 3, 5, 6}


 

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
 

Participation in class dialogue  Evidence of reading assignments through application of ideas in class dialogue. Dialogue questions are distributed prior to each class and teacher candidates demonstrate their careful reflection on the content  throughout the class. 100 Total Points

Class Presentation  As a small group (2-3 people) design: 1.) a class presentation which includes PowerPoint on the theorist/philosopher (views/perspectives, etc.) and 2.) a creative expression relating to the perspectives the individual's stand on contemporary issues. Individual participation and collaboration on group project is considered in final score. 40 Total Points

Personal philosophy statement (Core Assessment).
Teacher candidates will write a personal philosophy statement of education. Supporting documentation include: image of the child, image of the teacher, image of the family, theories that support views on children, teaching and family involvement. Citing references, especially when addressing theory, is necessary. 60 points

Board of Education Visit

Teacher Candidates will visit a School Board of Education meeting of his/her choice. Candidates will write a paper not only depicting the dialogue and tone of the meeting but also applying course content and ideas. 10 points

School Construct

In small groups, students will develop a philosophy for an ideal school and plan the environment to bring their ideas to life. 60 points 

Extra Credit Options:

Receive 5 extra credit points by attending a professional meeting (Reggio Collaborative, MNEA, etc.). Submit notes for points.

Receive 10 extra credit points for full participation in all classes (0 absences).

Grading:
 

A project packet, which includes all scoring guides and complete descriptions of assignments, will be distributed the first day of class

90-100% A

80-89%   B

70-79%   C

60-69%   D

0-59%     F

Based upon 280 total points

Late Submission of Course Materials:
 

Teacher candidates must follow the criteria outlined and abide by the due dates for each project. Late submissions are accepted only with prior approval from the professor. Twenty percent of the total points (for the project) may be deducted if the professor accepts the paper as a late submission. Teacher candidates may submit papers on time even if absent (via digital drop box, placing in professor’s mailbox, or sending with a friend).   It is the teacher candidate’s responsibility to contact the professor prior to due date if they do not understand the criteria for the assignments as explained

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
 

Reading/Class Participation

Teacher candidates are required to read the textbook chapters in order to participate in class discussions and small group activities.  Small group work includes dialogue and problem solving throughout the semester. Individual teacher candidates will receive partial points for class participation and interaction. The class projects are based on contents covered in the text and class dialogue.


Writing Assignments

 Scoring guides that include format for written assignments are provided for the course. Teacher candidates should attend the writing center to ensure that papers do not bear any technical writing and typological errors. Teacher candidates must cite references using APA style within the contents of the paper. Teacher candidates should write papers in order to explain all information (assume that the reader does not understand the information presented). This form of writing will enable the students to explain their ideas and understanding of content to the professor. Furthermore, this form will better enable students to explain ideas to family members of children with whom they will work in the future. All written papers should be saved for the purpose of revision.  Teacher candidates are allowed to make one revision for each written project if the grade is less than ninety percent and submitted on time. The due date for the revised papers is two weeks after they have been returned to students.

Mobile Phones and Messaging:


Participation in class is essential for everyone's learning. If teacher candidates must have a mobile phone for emergencies, they are required to turn to vibrate. Otherwise, all phones are to be turned off during class time. Text messaging is not permitting during class time.

Visiting Programs


When visiting early childhood programs for observations it is essential that teacher candidates always remember that they are representatives of Park University. Professional dress and behaviors are required during all observations.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
   

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

January 13        Getting Acquainted and Course Overview

January 15        Understanding the Teaching Profession

January  20       World Roots in Education, Pioneers of Modern Teaching, Philosophical Roots of Education (Develop Teams)

January 22        Facilitated Work Groups

January 27        Governing, Administrating Public Education, Financing Public Education and Legal Aspects

January 29        Guest Speaker Dr. Jim Singer

February 5          “Catch-up”

                           Ground Hog Day Party

February 11        Social class, Race, and School Achievement-Providing Equal Opportunity

February 12        Equal opportunities-continued

                           Valentine’s Day Party

February 19        Culture, Socialization, and Education

February 24      The Physical Environment & Families

February 26      Work Day---Work in Teams on Presentation

March 2            Purpose of Education

March 5           Curriculum and Instruction

                           Spring Break Party

MARCH 10 & 12 SPRING BREAK ENJOY!

March 17         School Effectiveness and reform

                        St. Patrick’s Day Party

March 19        NCLB

                        DUE: School Board Reflection

March 24        Issues and Ideas

DUE: Philosophy Statement

March 26         Work Day Work in Teams on Presentation

March 31         International Education 

DUE: Presentation Power point and Creative Expression ideas   

                        International Food Party                           

April 2              Work Day-----Work in Teams on Presentation

April 7             Theory Presentation Team 1 & 2

April 9              Theory Presentation Team 3 & 4

April 14            Theory Presentation Teams 5&6

April 16            Facilitated Work Day on Planning a School

April 21            Work Day-----Work in Teams on Planning a School

April 23            Facilitated Work Day----Work on Planning School         

April 28            First Teams present School

                           DUE: Individual Papers on Designing a School

April 30               Second group of teams present school

May   5            Third group of teams present school and END OF SEMESTER CELEBRATION FINAL TIME is 10:15-12:15!!!

***Reading Assignments and Questions for Dialogue will be posted on E-companion.

****Some class periods will be held as on-line discussions on E-Companion (TBD)

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90
Teacher Candidates are afforded two absences without deduction of participation points. It is the teacher candidate's responsibility to inform the professor prior to class absence. It is also the teacher candidate's responsibility to obtain notes and additional information from a friend enrolled in the class.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Analysis, Synthesis, and Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
-The artifact examined and analyzed the historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in education.   -Developed a comprehensive synthesis of evidenced-based theory and practice related to teachers and learners in the context of schools in our society.  -Presented and defended an educational philosophy reflecting 7 or more beliefs and more than 3 beliefs are supported by  evidenced-based theory and practice in the field of education. -The artifact analyzed the historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in education.   -Developed a synthesis of evidenced-based theory and practice related to teachers and learners in the context of schools in our society.  -Presented and defended an educational philosophy reflecting 6 or more beliefs and more than 3 beliefs are supported by  evidenced-based theory and practice in the field of education. -The artifact provided a discussion on the historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in education.   -Provided an essay on evidenced-based theory and practice related to teachers and learners in the context of schools in our society.  -Presented and defended an educational philosophy reflecting 5 or fewer  beliefs and less than 3 beliefs are supported by  evidenced-based theory and practice in the field of education. -The artifact presents ideas that are not documented or related to sound educational theory or philosophy.  Contains misuse of terms, which do not reflect mastery of sound educational theory or philosophy. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
-The artifact applied both knowledge and understanding of the foundations of education, evidenced-based theory, and practice in education; personal examples or insights are included.  -The artifact or philosophy reflects exemplary insights of the writer's future within their chosen  professional field; students, who plan to teach, should write to their future as an educator. -The artifact moderately applied both knowledge and understanding of the foundations of education, evidenced-based theory, and practice in education; personal examples or insights are included  .-The artifact or philosophy reflects appropriate insights of the writer's future within their chosen  professional field. -The artifact minimally applied both knowledge and understanding of the foundations of education, evidenced-based theory, and practice in education; personal examples or insights are included.  -The artifact or philosophy reflects little insight into  the writer's future within their chosen  professional field. Artifact presents confusing verbiage that is difficult to follow and lacks professional language. 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
-The artifact provided evidence on the mastery of the demands of writing an educational philosophy.  A deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues is documented through the use of a professional language and style and efficacy in its organization.  The philosophy's thesis is thoroughly and persuasively argued; organization is logical, supporting arguments are linked and arranged persuasively.  Transitions create a unified philosophy.   -For education majors, the philosophy reflects a relationship to SPA standards, MoSTEP standards, and education portfolio standards.  -A minimum of 4 pages with no errors in written conventions (no slang) ; (correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling). -The artifact moderately provided evidence on the mastery of the demands of writing an educational philosophy.  A deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues is documented through the use of a professional language and style and efficacy in its organization.  The philosophy's thesis is thoroughly and persuasively argued; organization is logical, supporting arguments are linked and arranged persuasively.  Transitions create a unified philosophy.   - For education majors, the philosophy reflects a relationship to SPA standards, MoSTEP standards, and education portfolio standards.   -A minimum of 3 pages with no errors in written conventions (no slang) ; (correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling). -The artifact minimally artifact provided evidence on the mastery of the demands of writing an educational philosophy.  A deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues is documented through the use of a professional language and style and efficacy in its organization.  The philosophy's thesis is thoroughly and persuasively argued; organization is logical, supporting arguments are linked and arranged persuasively.  Transitions create a unified philosophy.   -For education majors, the philosophy reflects a relationship to SPA standards, MoSTEP standards, and education portfolio standards.   -Less than 3 pages with several errors in written conventions (slang, correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling). -Multiple incorrect sentence structures, spellings, and/or grammar included. Less than two pages with multiple errors in written conventions (slang, correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling 
Competency Other Literacies (or Disciplinary Competency)                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
MoSTEP 1.2.4.1; 1.2.2.1, 1.2.2,2, 1.2.2.3, 1.2.9.1, 1.2.9.2, 1.2.9.3, Conceptual Framework knowledge 1A, 1D, 3F, Skills 2A, 3C, Dispositions 3B, 3D, 4C, 2B, 2A, 5A                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Accurate presentation of 7 or more beliefs.  More than three of the beliefs are supported by an appropriate, respected philosopher (ies) or theorists.  Personal examples or insights are included.  Essay demonstrates a deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues and written in a professional style and unique or enticing organization.  Essay reflects insights of the writer's future as an educator.  Correct sentence structure, punctuation, and grammar.   Transitions create unified essay.  Minimum four pages.  Professional language/ No slang terms. Accurate presentation of 6 beliefs.  Three of the beliefs are supported by an appropriate, respected  philosopher(ies) or theorists.  Essay written in a professional style, with clear and correct terminology, and with logical organization.  Essay demonstrates a grasp of educational terminology, ideas, and issues.  Essay reflects insights of the writer's future as an educator.  Correct sentence structure that utilizes transitions.  Minimum three pages.    Professional language/no slang terms. Presentation of 5 or fewer beliefs.  Less than three beliefs are supported by philosophers(ies) or theorists.  Essay written in a casual style with unclear usage of terminology and some illogical organization.  Essay reflects little insight into the writer's future as an educator.  Some incorrect sentence structures, spelling, and/or grammar exhibited.  More transitions are needed.  Less than three pages.  Weak professional language and/or contains a slang term. Essay is a rambling of ideas not documented or related to sound educational theory or philosophy.  Several incorrect sentence structures, spellings, and/or grammar included.   Choppy and confusing verbiage that is difficult to follow.  Less than two pages.  Lacks professional language and contains slang terms. 
Competency Other Literacies (or Disciplinary Competency)                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
MoSTEP 1.2.11.1 Conceptual Framework: Knowledge 2D, Skills 2F, 3A; Dispositions 2D                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
In portfolio document, introductory sentence is included; Essay defines “technology operations” and “technology concepts.” Two or more examples of “technology operations” are identified and explained as related to adding their philosophy of education to an electronic portfolio and assessment system.. In portfolio document, introductory sentence is included.  Essay defines “technology operations” and “technology concepts”.  One example of “technology operations” are identified and explained as related to adding their philosophy of education to an electronic portfolio and assessment system    





 
In portfolio document, introductory sentence is included. Essay weakly defines “technology operations” and “technology concepts.” examples of “technology operations” are identified and explained as related as related to adding their philosophy of education to an electronic portfolio and assessment system





 
In portfolio document, missing artifact and its application to this indicator.  No introductory sentence on electronic portfolio development, and several mistakes in sentence structure, grammar. 

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Last Updated:1/13/2009 1:51:31 PM