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ED 525 Adult Educ. Facilitation Strat.
Peterman, Thomas W.


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

ED 525 Adult Educ. Facilitation Strat.

Semester

U1P 2009 DL

Faculty

Peterman, Thomas W.

Title

Vice President for Distance Learning, Park University

Degrees/Certificates

PhD - Education, Michigan State Univesity
MLS - Master of Library Science, University of Mixxouri - Columbia
MA - Classroom Teaching, Eastern Michigan University

Office Location

College for Distance Learning, Parkville Campus

Office Hours

8:30-5PM

Daytime Phone

816-584-6280

Other Phone

816-796-0475

E-Mail

tomp@park.edu

tpeterman3@yahoo.com

Semester Dates

Summer 2009 - June 1 - July 24, 2009

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Prerequisites

none

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

REQUIRED: 
     

      ·        APA Publication Manual 5th edition (please note the web site has manual corrections in a pdf download)

·        Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and education.  New York: Touchstone.   

·        Galbrith, M. W. (2004).  Adult learning methods: A guide for effective instruction (3rd Ed.).  Malabar, FL: Krieger.

·        Other readings and videos as assigned in the class. 

     
 
 

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

 

 

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
ED525 Adult Education Facilitation Strategies: This course provides facilitators in an adult education or training environment with a varied of facilitated strategies to enhance the delivery of course content and to create a healthy learning environment, development of facilitation strategies to various learning styles and multiple intelligences will also be explored. Specific techniques such as role playing, ice breakers, brainstorming and use of technology will be covered

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate various facilitation strategies;
  2. Apply facilitation strategies to meet various learning styles;
  3. Apply technology as a delivery strategy;
  4. Present a short learning module using various facilitation strategies.


Core Assessment:

Class Assessment:

 

Assignment Details ED 525

Please see the Grading Rubrics for each assignment in the DocSharing section of the course for detailed grading criteria

Discussion Participation: 80 points

Graduate work is dialogic in nature and as such there are several opportunities to dialog with class members and the facilitator in this class. The purpose of the weekly discussions is to ensure an environment that fosters collaborative learning through a sharing of ideas, perspectives, and experiences that inform our interpretation of the course materials and content. Each week you are required to post an initial response to the posted Discussion Thread question by Wednesday with an additional two posts to other class members by the end of the week (Sunday 11:59pm CT). If additional questions are posted by the facilitator during the discussion please respond as these are also included and reviewed as part of the overall grade. Please review the grading rubric.

Requirements:

  1. Post initial response to the discussion topic by midnight Wednesday;
  2. Initial post must be three paragraphs, reflective on the week’s readings, correct grammar, APA format, and include at least two citations from that week’s readings (text or supplemental reading), web or pod cast, videos, or other source to support your comments;
  3. Provide reflective and insightful responses to two classmate’s initial postings by midnight on Sunday.

 

Presentation #1 & #2: 50 points each

This course is practical in nature and as such there is a need for you to demonstrate some of the early skills explained and apply them in a “real” learning environment. You will record yourself facilitating two learning sessions of 15 – 20 minutes (VHS or digital) on any topic of your choice (cooking, building project, a language etc.). Select a topic you find fun and know well. Think outside the box for this assignment; there must be at least six adult participants.

Requirements:

  1. Select your topic for your learning experience;
  2. Organize your learning session;
  3. Presentation #1 is your baseline – no specific requirements; 
  4. For Presentation #2 you must include evidence of four methods, techniques, or facilitation strategies from the weekly lectures, text, or podcast.
  5. Present and record your learning session;
  6. View your session before you mail or load;
  7. Post in the Journal tool the week the presentations are due and include:
    1. describe the audience;
    2. describe and explain the methods, techniques, or facilitation strategies you implemented;
    3. critique your presentation – what would you change next time and why.
  8. Mail your VHS tape to the address in the Instructor’s Office or upload your digital version in the Dropbox by midnight on the due date.

 

Dewey Paper: 100 points

Write a five to seven page paper on Dewey’s concepts and how you envision their application in today’s learning environment (or not). Support your position with citations from other academic sources and incorporate Dewey’s work into your discussion. This is not a book report; it is an application of Dewey’s work to modern adult learning. Make sure you review the Grading Rubric for details.    

Requirements:

  1. Read Experience & Education by John Dewey;
  2. Write a discussion paper using the format provided in the Writing Center and APA format as defined by the APA Manual;
  3. Have at least five academic references outside of Dewey’s work;
  4. Place your completed paper in the Dropbox by Friday midnight (CT) of Week 4.

 

Second Life Entry: 20 points

During the term you will visit and engage in a virtual world called Second Life. While this may seem like a game, this space is increasing being utilized by college and training environments for learning spaces. As a class we will explore the sight and discuss its value, challenges, and overall considerations of this type of learning environment.  

Requirements:

  1. Go to the web site as identified in Week 1;
  2. Download the software Week 1;
  3. Create an avatar Week 2,
  4. Upload your avatar and its name in the Discussion Thread of Week 2;
  5. Go through the tutorial island Weeks 3 - 6;
  6. Post in the Second Life Discussion Thread Week 7.

 

Final Presentation – Core Assessment: 150 points

This course is practical in nature and as such there is a need for you to demonstrate the skills you have acquired during the term and apply them in a “real” learning environment. You will record yourself facilitating a learning session of 45 minutes (VHS or digital) on a theory or concept of your choice related to adult learning. Think outside the box for this assignment. The only requirements are that whatever you do must be recorded. You must have at least six adult participants, demonstrate evidence of six facilitation strategies from the course, provide handouts, and post a brief one page summary of the adult theory/concept on which you presented

Requirements:

  1. Select your topic for your learning experience;
  2. Organize your learning session;
  3. Submit via Dropbox Week 6 by midnight Friday a draft of your Instructional Planning Guide;
  4. Present and record your learning session;
  5. View your session before you mail or load;
  6. Before you mail review your presentation and take notes on your facilitation skills. Keep your notes;
  7. Mail your VHS tape to the address in the Instructor’s Office or upload your digital version in the Dropbox by midnight on the due date;
  8. Place your Instructional Planning Guide in the Dropbox by midnight Tuesday of Week 8; 
  9. If your presentation is in digital formal please load to the Presentation Discussion Thread for others to view;
  10. Post a one page summary of the adult theory/concept on which you presented in the Presentation Discussion Thread. 

 

Final Exam – Required: 100 points

 
 

Grading:

 Grading Points:


Dewey Paper - 100 points
Presentation # 1- 50 points 
Presentation # 2 - 50 points
Final Presenation - 150 points
Participation - 80 points
Second Life - 20 points
Final - 100 points
TOTAL: 550
 

Letter Grade Policy

 

Number of Points

 

 

Letter

From

To

Percent

A

495

550

90-100

B

440

494

80-89.9

C

385

439

70-79.9

D

330

384

60-69.9

F

0

329

Below 59.9

Late Submission of Course Materials:
In fairness to those who complete their work on time,  late assignments will not be accepted.  If you have an emergency please contact the instructor as soon as possible.   

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
  

Week

Required Readings

 

G = Galbraith

ED 525 Activities & Assignments Due:

 

All weekly required readings and the following:

Week 1:  

 

Review of  Adult Learning

 

 

 

G: 1, 2, 3, 6,

Read Dewey prior to Week 4 paper

Watch posted videos

  1. First Discussion post no later than Wednesday midnight
  1. Download Second Life (SL) Software: http://secondlife.com/
  1. Complete: Philosophy of Adult Education Inventory (page 59 of Galbraith) 

Week 2:

 

Facilitating Adult Learning

 

 

 

G: 4, 5, 9, 17

Dewey prior to Week 4 paper

Watch posted videos

  1. First Discussion post no later than Wednesday midnight
  1. Create Avatar and post your avatar’s “photo” and name in SL Discussion Thread
  1. Complete:  Principles of Adult Learning Scale (page 87 of Galbraith)
  1. Schedule proctor 

Week 3:  

 

Motivation in Adult Learning

 

Kroth & Boverie

G: 7

Dewey prior to Week 4 paper

Watch posted videos

  1. First Discussion post no later than Wednesday midnight
  1. Presentation # 1 Presentation postmarked or loaded in Dropbox no later than midnight Thursday
  1. Post Presentation #1 reflections in Journal
  1. Go to the SL Tutorial Island and learn to navigate your way in SL
  1. Optional: Take the Learning Styles Inventory ($25) and post your results in Discussion #2 http://www.haygroup.com/tl/Questionnaires_Workbooks/Kolb_Learning_Style_Inventory.aspx

 

Week 4: 

 

Techniques

 

 

 

Squires

G: 10, 12, 15, 18, 19, 20

Watch posted videos

  1. First Discussion post no later than Wednesday midnight
  1. Dewey Paper due no later than Friday midnight in Dropbox
  1. Go to the SL Tutorial Island and learn to navigate your way in SL

Week 5:

 

Dialog In Adult Learning

 

 

 

G: 11, 21, 22

Watch posted videos

  1. First Discussion post no later than Wednesday midnight
  1. Presentation # 2 Presentation postmarked or loaded in Dropbox no later than midnight Thursday
  1. Post Presentation #2 reflections in Journal
  1. Go to the SL Tutorial Island and learn to navigate your way in SL

Week 6:

 

Experiential Learning

 

 

 

Dewey

G: 10, 18, 19

Watch posted videos

  1. First Discussion post no later than Wednesday midnight
  1. Submit via Dropbox your Instructional Planning Guide (page 114 of Galbraith) for final presentation no later than Saturday midnight 
  1. Go to the SL Tutorial Island and learn to navigate your way in SL

Week 7:

 

Technology

 

 

Childress & Braswell

Squires

G: 13, 14

Watch posted videos

1.     First Discussion post no later than Wednesday midnight

2.     Respond to Second Life discussion no later than midnight of Thursday

Week 8:

 

Ethics, Globalization, & Reflection 

 

 

 

G: 8, 16, 17

Watch posted videos

  1. First Discussion post no later than Wednesday midnight
  1. Final Presentation postmarked or loaded in Dropbox no later than midnight Tuesday
  1. If you have a digital presentation load in the Discussion Thread for Presentation
  1. Post a one page summary of the adult theory/concept on which you presented in the Presentation discussion thread to facilitate additional learning to the class
  1. Instructional Planning Guide due in Dropbox no later than midnight Tuesday
  1. Take final

Academic Honesty:
As a learning community, the University upholds the highest standards of academic integrity in all its academic activities, by faculty, staff, administrators and students. Academic integrity involves much more than respecting intellectual property rights. It lies at the heart of learning, creativity, and the core values of the University. Those who learn, teach, write, publish, present, or exhibit creative works are advised to familiarize themselves with the requirements of academic integrity and make every effort to avoid possible offenses against it, knowingly or unknowingly. Park University 2008-2009 Graduate Catalog Page 25
Park University's Student Code of Conduct will be applied to this course.  All students are expected to adhere to the policies as set forth in the Code of Conduct.

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct.  Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2008-2009 Graduate Catalog Page 25


Attendance Policy:

Professors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences for two successive weeks, without approved excuse, will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Executive Director for the Graduate School, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2008-2009 Graduate Catalog Page 29

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:5/18/2009 4:05:08 PM