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SP 202 Intermediate Spanish II
Byer, Silvia


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

SP 202 Intermediate Spanish II

Semester

SP 2009 HO

Faculty

Byer, Silvia

Title

Assistant Professor

Degrees/Certificates

Ph.D. in Romance Literatures
Master in Romance Literatures
Master in Teaching Foreign Languages

Office Location

CO216

Office Hours

T-TH 12-2:30

Daytime Phone

816-584-6865

E-Mail

silvia.byer@park.edu

Class Days

--T-R--

Class Time

8:45 - 10:00 AM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Nuestras Culturas

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
SP202 Intermediate Spanish II: A continuation of the grammatical and cultural studies undertaken in SP201. This course includes content-based projects in the target language. Prerequisite: SP201 or four years of high school Spanish. 3:0:3

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate how, when and why to say what to whom with language skills corresponding to advanced intermediate level Spanish as outlined in the selected textbook;
  2. Write short paragraphs, situation and research summaries;
  3. Engage in spontaneous conversation with classmates and instructor
  4. Complete the CAR project.


Core Assessment:

Classroom performance, quizzes and exams, accompanying textbook, homework, language immersion lab, mid-term exam, final exam and Core Project.Core Project: Produce and present as a group a play read in class for target audience such as SP201.






Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
 

By the end of the course the students will be able to:

1.       Easily converse in Spanish

2.       Know more about cultural differences and characteristics of the Spanish speaking world

3.       Know historical facts about Spain and Europe

4.       Relate to people in Spanish knowing the subtleties of the different registers

5.       Write or summarize a text in a correct sequence of tenses

Grading:
 

30%     Attendance - homework - class participation

30%     Tests (3) each worth 10%

10%     Compositions (2) each worth 5%

10%     Presentation     

20%    Final Exam

Late Submission of Course Materials:
No late submission

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
 

DEPARTMENTAL GRADING SCALE:

A =   100 - 90               C = 79 - 70      

B =    89 - 80                D = 69 -60                    F = below 60

Please realize that progress is more important than stellar beginnings. Lack of progress is of special concern and should receive our immediate attention. Talk with me if your grade ever falls below 70%. 

ABSENCES: This class meets three times a week. You are permitted 3 unexcused absences or “cuts.” For each absence beyond the second class missed, you lose 2% of your final semester average. The calculation of absences will begin after the drop-add period.   If tardiness becomes a problem, the following policy will apply: 2 (two) late arrivals to class = 1 absence.

An absence can be excused ONLY if it is due to a legitimate reason (e.g., illness, death in the family). Please give me in writing an explanation for each excused absence or e-mail me at silvia.byer@park.edu. If I have no explanation, I will assume the absence is a “cut.” Absences will not be excused if students schedule an appointment (for example with the doctor, dean or professor) during class time. Students should not expect any leniency concerning this policy, since its enforcement is not an individual prerogative but rather a collective obligation. If a student must miss a class, s/he must let me know IN ADVANCE the reason for the absence. S/he can either leave a message in my mailbox, or e-mail me.

CLASS PARTICIPATION: Learning requires your active involvement. Involvement is possible only when you have prepared your assigned materials carefully. Therefore, attendance and class participation are obligatory for all class meetings. Your class participation grade will be determined by daily attendance, preparation for class and by your active role in class meetings. Active participation means consistently speaking Spanish in the classroom, contributing significantly to group work, and volunteering as much as possible without dominating the class.

Preparation and Participation: In addition to attending class, you are expected to participate actively.  Homework will be assigned and checked regularly.  Preparation and practice are essential for success in learning a foreign language. Your Preparation and Participation grade (30% of your course grade) will take into account your daily attendance, your contributions to all class activities (individual work, group work, whole class activities), your interaction with your classmates and instructor, and your timely and thorough completion of all assignments.
Explanation of Preparation/Participation Grade:
AStudent comes to class fully prepared, bringing proper materials, arriving on time and staying the full length of the class.  Student is attentive and frequently volunteers to participate.  Student is actively involved in all class activities and stays on task in group work.  Any questions or comments are pertinent.
BStudent is usually well prepared.  Student is always attentive, participates actively in all activities and volunteers during most class periods.  Student asks only pertinent questions.
CStudent shows evidence of being unprepared on occasion.  Student may arrive late or leave early in some instances.  Student volunteers infrequently and may ask questions that would not be necessary with proper preparation for class.
D Student is unprepared and/or inattentive.  Student rarely volunteers and demonstrates a lack of involvement in class activities.  Student may not stay on task in group work and may ask unnecessary or inappropriate questions.
FStudent exhibits lack of concern for the class.  His or her behavior may have a negative effect on the class.

  PREPARATION FOR CLASSStudents are expected to prepare for class before coming to class. I.E. you must read the assigned pages in the textbook. Language acquisition is a skill you must practice daily. Failure to keep up with the daily assignments will result in your falling behind very quickly and receiving a low grade in the course. It is far more productive to spend a small amount of time on Spanish each day than to spend long hours cramming just before a test. Class will certainly be used to clarify doubts, answer questions, but above all, to put into practice and use in a meaningful way that which students have prepared. Students are always welcome and advised to discuss any question related to the language and course material during an arranged appointment. 

Your work will not be evaluated on the basis of how many mistakes you make but on how thoroughly you correct your work. Mistakes are part of the learning process. You must identify your errors and learn from them. I collect homework everyday.

ORAL INTERVIEWS: Prepare a power point presentation in class (NO READING ALLOWED)

PRESENTATIONSBelow are the topics for Oral Presentations (Presentational Communication) and for Conversations (Interpersonal Communication) for each chapter.

The rubric below will be used for the assessment of Presentational Communication:
   

Communication:  Did the student make 
him/herself understood?

A
30

A
28

B
27

B
25

C
24

C
23

D
21

Accuracy:  Was the grammar sufficiently correct
to ensure comprehension/communication?

20

19

18

17

16

15

14

Vocabulary:  Was the student's vocabulary
adequate for communication?

20

19

18

17

16

15

14

Fluency:  Did the student's speech flow or were 
there distracting hesitations?

10

9

8.5

8

7.5

7

6.5

Pronunciation:  Did the pronunciation enhance rather
than impede communication?

10

9

8.5

8

7.5

7

6.5

Content:  Did the presentation follow the guidelines?

10

9

8.5

8

7.5

7

6.5

 

 

EXAMS:

Exams will be given as indicated during class time.

The Final Examination is cumulative and is administered on dates specifically determined by the Registrar. 

An individual professor CANNOT excuse a student from taking the final examination on the scheduled date.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

 1

Jan 13

Introducción

 

15

Cap 1

2

20

Cap 1

 

22

Cap 1  

3

27

Cap 2

 

29

Cap 2

Composition Due

4

Feb 3

Cap 2

5

Review

5

10

Exam 1

12

Cap 3

6

17

Cap 3

19

Cap 3

7

24

Cap 4

26

Cap 4

8

March 3

Cap 4

4

Composition in class

9

10

Vacaciones

12

Vacaciones

10

 

17

19

Review                

Exam 2

11

24

Video

Composition Due

26

Cap 5

12

31

Cap 5

April 2

Cap 5

13

7

Cap 6

9

Cap 6

14

14

Cap 6


[                       16        Review                                                 ]          

15

21

Exam 3

23

Presentations

16

28

Presentations

                        30        Presentations

Final TBA

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1,3,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Uses course resources and additional sources for developing dramatic script; shows outstanding creative skills in group effort, contributes effectively and contributes to group cohesion and success. Uses course resources for developing dramatic script; shows creative skills in group effort, contributes effectively and contributes to group cohesion and success. Fails to use adequate course resources for developing dramatic script; shows inconsistent skills and effort in group activity;  final product is largely unsuccessful No synthesis nor coherent presentation is evident for grading as presented – see professor for advice on procedure to follow. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1,2,3,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Writer/Presenter systematically critiques the many elements of the dramatic script and production; creative insight is offered in the contribution of relevant ideas. Writer/Presenter critiques many elements of the dramatic script and production; creative insight is sometimes offered in the contribution of relevant ideas. There is little evidence of critique of the dramatic script and production; components of the piece don't link well and/or fail to be coherently relayed to audience.





 
Analysis is not evident for grading as presented –see professor for advice on procedure to follow 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
1,2,3,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Many examples of research, use of course materials and individual creativity are evident in the writing and presentation assignment.





 
Some examples of research, use of course materials and individual creativity are evident in the writing and presentation assignment.











 
Few examples of research, use of course materials and individual creativity are evident in the writing and presentation assignment.





 
Evaluation is not evident based on lack of synthesis and analysis aspects- see professor to advice on procedure to follor 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1,2,3,4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Correct use of discipline and project-specific terms is utilized efficiently throughout script assignment and presentation.





 
Correct use of discipline and project-specific terms is utilized at times throughout the script assignment and presentation. Correct use of discipline and project-specific terms not utilized in script assignment and/or presentation. Evidence of terminology and project-specific terms evidence is lacking because the core assessment has not been attempted in any part. 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1,2,3,4,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Many concepts developed in class for successful projects are utilized and elaborated in assignment. Some concepts developed in class for successful projects are utilized and elaborated in assignment. Few concepts developed in class for successful projects are utilized and elaborated in assignment.





 
There is no demonstration


of knowledge of concepts


important to the project assigned.


 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
2,3,4,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
There are multiple examples of how learned practices apply to the theoretical bases of the project.  Student met more than two times with instructor to discuss the project. There are some examples of how learned practices apply to the theoretical bases of the project. Student met twice with instructor to discuss the project. There are few examples of how learned practices apply to the theoretical bases of the project. Student met once with instructor to discuss the project. There is no evidence of how learned practices apply to the theoretical bases of the project. Student failed to meet with instructor to discuss the project. 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
1,2,3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Written and oral project components contain consistent structural  organization – sequencing with all topics included, specific transition sentences, and logical conclusion according to evidence presented





 
Written and oral project components contain some structural organization –sequencing with all topics included, specific transition sentences, and logical conclusion according to evidence presented. Written and oral project components contain little structural organization, and there are few transitions; lack of logical sequencing of topics distracts from the reading and listening. The core assessment is not organized,  no transitions, too many errors for written and oral presentations at the university level. 

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Last Updated:1/12/2009 7:30:30 PM