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MK 351 Principles of Marketing
Fetters, Margery


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

MK 351 Principles of Marketing

Semester

S1B 2009 BL

Faculty

Fetters, Margery

Title

Instructor

Degrees/Certificates

B.S. Finance
M.B.A. Marketing
M.S. Management and Organizational Behavior

Office Location

Classroom

Office Hours

Before & after class - the primary way to contact me at any time is by email using the primary email address: margery.fetters@park.edu.  I will respond within 24 hours.  You can also call Park's primary contact telephone number (915) 564-5879 and leave a message for me.  On calls days, arrangements can be made to meet with me before or after class.

E-Mail

margery.fetters@park.edu

margeryfetters@zianet.com

Semester Dates

1/5/09-3/1/09

Class Days

------S

Class Time

8:00 - 1:00 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Basic Marketing, 17 ed., by Perreault, Cannon, and McCarthy.   McGraw-Hill Irwin Publishing Company. ISBN: 13-9780073381053

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
MK351 Principles of Marketing: Examines factors relevant to the marketing mix (product, promotion, distribution, and price) and to marketing management. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
The instructor's educational philosophy is one of interactiveness based on lectures, readings, dialogues, examinations, and writings. The instructor will engage each student to encourage the lively exploration of ideas, issues and contradictions.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Explain the importance of the marketing mix.
  2. Describe and analyze the marketing management functions.
  3. Explain the elements of a marketing plan.
  4. Describe the stages of the product life cycle.
  5. Explain and analyze the advantages and disadvantages of entering international markets.
  6. Explain the impact of e-commerce on the marketing functions.


Core Assessment:

A comprehensive marketing case analysis is the chosen assessment device for the Principles of Marketing course. This case will be the final exam and is designed to gauge your knowledge of the core outcomes of the class. This will be a closed book, closed note examination held during the designated final exam slot for this section in a proctored environment. Students are expected to spend approximately 45 minutes reading the case and 1 hour and 15 minutes developing an essay that addresses the core outcomes relative to the firm information presented in the case. This test will count for at least 20% of your grade. This course is part of the University-wide assessment evaluation, and all sections will receive the same case for analysis.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
Class and group participation, exams, case study, and project will be used to assess activities.   The exams may consist of some combination of multiple-choice and essay questions. For the multiple-choice questions, you will be asked to pick the best answer (there is only one) from among those presented.     After you get your exam back, however, if you think that a question is ambigu­ous or that more than one answer is appropriate (for example, the answer depends on some unstated assumption), you will have the opportunity to write out a brief explanation (defense) of your logic and your answer, using the book and power-point presentations as your sources. You will be given credit if your explanation reveals that you understand the issues involved.   (Note: there is no requirement to write explana­tions - and most students find that they are unnecessary.)    You should recognize from the very beginning that there is much more material in your reading assignment, and related activities than is possible to cover, repeat, and develop in detail in class. Lectures will only touch on some of the issues.   Thus, although exams tend to place somewhat more emphasis on topics that are covered in both the text and in the class, the focus of the exams is on the core material from your readings.   Class discussions and related assignments will be directly relevant to your understanding of the material and other aspects of your performance (i.e. quality of your decisions in the project, participating in class discussions, essay portion of the exams), but the exams will go into depth on what you have been assigned to read.   The discussion portion of the exams will not simply ask you to recite/rehash a particular idea or concept developed in your reading or a specific class discussion, but will require that you demonstrate an ability to analyze a situation, determine relevant issues, and integrate a set of ideas. That is what you are expected to do with the class assignments we will be covering throughout the course. Thus, that work on those assign­ments will be particularly important in developing skills relevant to this portion of the exams. Please keep in mind that being prepared and present for the exams is your responsibility.   The exams are on the schedule, and I urge you to mark them on your calendar now.    Missing a scheduled exam without prior permission will result in a zero for that exam.   There will be no make-up exams, unless under critical circumstances. Make-up tests will consist entirely of multiple-choice questions and will cover all material from the chapters, which may be more than the Study Guide provided for each exam  There may be unannounced pop quizzes during the term.   There is no make-up pop quiz. If you are not in class when a pop quiz is given, you cannot make it up.

Grading:
 

Item

Points

Percentage of Grade

Exams (2@200 pts. each

400

40%

Group Participation

100

10%

Group Presentation

200

20%

Participation/Professionalism

100

10%

Case/Final

200

20%

Total

1000 Points

100%

Grading Scale

A =  901 -- 1000 points

B =  801 -- 900 points

C =  701 -- 800 points  

D =  601 -- 700 points  

F =  < 600 points

The course grade for students will be based on the overall average of homework and tests taken during the course in accordance with the weighting of the various requirements as stated in the syllabus.

All final exams in all School of Business and Management courses will be comprehensive and will be closed book and closed notes. They will constitute 30% of the total course grade and will not be a take-home exam. They will be completed during the test week in the period designated by the registrar or by the Proctor in the case online courses. If calculators are allowed, they will not be multifunctional electronic devices that include features such as: phones, cameras, instant messaging, pagers, and so forth. Electronic Computers will not be allowed on final exams unless an exception is made by the Dean of the School of Business and Management.

Late Submission of Course Materials:
All assignments are due prior to or at the time of class on the date indicated in the syllabus or as stated in class, or else it is considered late.    Problems with printers, faulty disks, or other technical emergencies are not adequate excuses. YOU MUST ALLOW YOURSELF PLENTY OF TIME TO DEAL WITH THESE KINDS OF TECHNICAL GLITCHES.   Handwritten assignments will not be accepted and no extension will be granted to type work. Late assignments will not receive credit.   If you anticipate being absent, it is to your advantage to turn in your assignment(s) early.    In the case of illness or other excused absence, work should be emailed or delivery arranged. If you cannot do this, you must communicate with the instructors to explain the situation. Under some circumstances, late work may be accepted, but there may be a penalty.   This possibility should not be taken for granted; work not handed in receives a grade of “F.” All assignments are to be typed/word processed to receive a grade.    

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
 

1.       Each student will be provided with a tentative schedule, which should be used as a guideline for the class.

2.       Chapter assignments should be read PRIOR to coming to class. There will be a discussion in class on chapters.

3.       Class attendance and participation is imperative of all students. Class participation is expected and is a part of the final grade.  Students are expected to attend all classes and be on time.  Attendance will be taken each class meeting.   Class starts promptly at the appointed time, and the student will be expected to be on time, ready to work.   If the student is going to be late for class, the student is required to notify the instructor BEFORE the start of class.  Absolutely no exceptions!!  Those students that are habitually late will be dealt with in an appropriate manner and it will affect your attendance/participation/professionalism grade.

 Classes missed for legitimate reasons and with PRIOR NOTIFICATION may be excusable.  Absences will be reflected in the participation grade and the final grade.  Two (one for Saturday session) unexcused or four (two for Saturday session) excused absences will be reported to the Park College Office, as required.  Absences in excess of these guidelines will result in a grade of “F”.   For an excused absence, you must call prior to class time.   Attendance is vital and considered participation.  All absences, excused or unexcused, will lose  points from the final grade calculation.  One or two absences will not affect your grade too much.  A significant amount of absences WILL start affecting your grade.

 4.       If for some reason a student must be absence for a class when an exam is scheduled, the student MUST notify the instructor DIRECTLY and receive APPROVAL from the instructor PRIOR to the scheduled class session; otherwise the student will not be allowed to make up the exam and will receive a zero for the exam.

5.       Please type all, projects and assignments! Also, cover page is needed for all papers.

6.       Submitting someone else's work as your own will not be tolerated.  If determined by the instructor that academic dishonesty has occurred in any part of the course, the student(s) involved will be given a grade of “F”, dropped from the course, and the matter reported to the Director.

7.       All CELL PHONES off during class.

CHANGES TO THE SYLLABUS:   The instructor reserves the right to make changes of the syllabus in order to enhance the learning methodology. Students will be notified of substantive changes at least the week prior to the effective date.   

NOTE:    If you are having trouble with assigned work, please come and see me as early as possible.   I will offer as much assistance as possible. It will be futile to see me the last few days before the final examination in an attempt to improve your grade.

CELL PHONES: As a courtesy to your fellow classmates, it is important that you refrain from talking during lecture so that others can hear. Radios, CD players, beepers, etc. must be turned off during class. Cell phones are to be either turned off, put on vibrate, or on silent and should only be used during an extreme emergency. If your job requires that you be on call during class time, please speak with me at the beginning of the semester.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 Week 1: (1/10/09)
*Marketing's Value to Consumers, Firms, and Society  

*Marketing Strategy Planning

*WORKSHOP

· Readings:   Text: Read Chapters 1 and 2  

·Week 2: (1/17/09)
*Focusing Marketing Strategy with Segmentation & Positioning
*Evaluating Target Market Opportunities in a Changing Marketing Environment

*Demographic Dimensions of Global Consumer Markets

*WORKSHOP

· Readings:   Text: Read Chapters 3, 4, 5

Week 3: (1/24/08)
TEST #1 (Chapters 1 - 5) at beginning of class
*Final Consumers with Their Buying Behavior
*Improving Decisions with Marketing Information

*WORKSHOP
 

-Readings
:   Text: Read Chapters 6, 8

Week 4: (1/31/09)
*Elements of Product Planning for Goods & Services
*Production Management & New Product Development
*WORKSHOP
 

· Readings:   Text: Read Chapters 9, 10 

Week 5: (2//7/09)
TEST #2 (Chapters 6, 8-10) at beginning of class
*Place & Development of Channel Systems
*Distribution, Customer Service & Logistics
*Retailers & Wholesalers & Their Strategic Planning
*WORKSHOP

· Readings:   Text: Read Chapters 11, 12, 13

Week 6: (2/14/09)
*Promotion - Introduction to Integrated Marketing Communications
*Advertising & Sales Promotion
-Case Preparation
*WORKSHOP

· Readings:   Text: Read Chapters 14, 16

Week 7:  (2/21/09)
*Pricing Objectives & Policies
*Price Setting in the Business World

*WORKSHOP

*Case/Final

· Readings:   Text: Read Chapters 17, 18 

Week 8: (2/28/09)

PRESENTATIONS

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:
 

  STANDARDS OF ACHIEVEMENT – GRADING – GENERAL GUIDELINES


 A:              Students can define, describe, and communicate effectively their understanding of basic marketing consistently and exceptionally. Students participate actively in class discussion and assignments, and offer alternatives and solutions that are based on concrete theoretical information and/or factual information generated from readings.   Students can integrate consistently basic theoretical concepts, ethical implications and multicultural issues. Students attend all classes and complete all projects consistently and exceptionally.


B:          Students can define, describe and communicate effectively most of the basic concepts in marketing consistently. Students participate most of the time in class discussion, assignments, and offer alternatives and solutions that are based on concrete theoretical information and/or factual information generated from readings. Students can integrate most of the basic theoretical concepts, ethical implications and multicultural issues. Students attend most classes and complete all projects consistently and/or exceptionally.   


C:          Students can define, describe and/or communicate effectively most of their understanding of basic marketing. Students participate most of the time in class discussion, assignments, and/or offers alternatives and solutions that are based on concrete theoretical information and/or factual information generated from readings. Students can identify some basic theoretical concepts, ethical implications and multicultural issues. Students attend most classes and complete all projects consistently and adequately. 


D:          Students can define or describe or communicate effectively some basic concepts in marketing. Students participate sometimes in class discussion, assignments, and/or offers alternatives and solutions that are based on some theoretical foundation and/or factual information generated from readings. Students can identify very few of the basic theoretical concepts, ethical implications and multicultural issues. Students attend most classes and complete all projects but poorly.


F:               Students are unable to define or describe or communicate effectively some basic understanding in marketing. Students seldom or never participate in class discussion, assignments, and offer no alternatives and solutions that are based on some theoretical foundation and/or factual information generated from readings. Students can identify very few of the basic theoretical concepts, ethical implications and multicultural issues. Students attend most classes and/or complete some/none of the projects poorly.


 PARTICIPATION/PROFESSIONALISM


You will be expected to attend class as scheduled. Attendance will be taken on a regular basis.   You will be marked absent if you arrive after attendance is taken. Excessive absenteeism will mean a reduction in your final grade. Classes missed for legitimate reasons and with PRIOR NOTIFICATION may be excusable. Absences will be reflected in the participation grade and the final grade.  Two (one for Saturday session) unexcused or four (two for Saturday session) excused absences will be reported to the Park College Office, as required. Absences in excess of these guidelines will result in a grade of “F”.   To recognize the importance of participation, if you have more than two unexcused absences, your final grade will be dropped one letter grade. Any further absences may result in a recommendation to drop the course, the loss of further letter grades in proportion to the absences and/or loss of academic credit for the course, or in failure. (NOTE: excused absences are those due to 1) illness, 2) work-related trips, 3) verifiable court dates, or 4) family emergencies. As a professional courtesy, please advise in writing of the days you know you will be absent. Verification of the nature of the absence is required.   A physician's excuse detailing the reason(s) for the absence(s), documentation of traffic and court dates, notification from work for any work-related trip, and/or documentation for a family crises.


You will be expected to be prepared and to participate in the classroom discussions and activities. Your involvement (or lack of) will be considered in your final grade. Please do not be afraid to speak and become involved in the class. Incorrect responses in the classroom will not hurt your participation grade! This class is a learning experi­ence and your thoughts and contributions are an integral part of our joint intel­lec­tual growth. Participation will be correlated, in part, to your attendance. If you are not there, you cannot participate. The following is the formula for participation points: (1) you will lose ten points if you arrive late for class or leave class early; (2) you will lose 20 points for each excused absence; and (3) you will lose 50 points for each unexcused absence.    


Remember, class attendance and participation is imperative of all students. Class participation is expected and is a part of the final grade.  Students are expected to attend all classes and be on time.  Attendance will be taken each class meeting.   Class starts promptly at the appointed time, and the student will be expected to be on time, ready to work.   If the student is going to be late for class, the student is required to notify the instructor BEFORE the start of class.  Absolutely no exceptions!!  Those students that are habitually late will be dealt with in an appropriate manner and it will affect your attendance/participation/professionalism grade.   Classes missed for legitimate reasons and with PRIOR NOTIFICATION may be excusable.  Absences will be reflected in the participation grade and the final grade.  Two (one for Saturday session) unexcused or four (two for Saturday session) excused absences will be reported to the Park College Office, as required.  Absences in excess of these guidelines will result in a grade of “F”.   For an excused absence, you must call or email prior to class time.   Attendance is vital and considered participation. 


The class provides an opportunity for you to develop abilities in communi­cating with others about your ideas and approaches for dealing with marketing situations.   This is important. After graduation you will spend much of your career doing just that ... regardless of the specific career area you pursue. The potential of this opportunity is only fully realized if you make meaning­ful contributions to the course in class discussions and debate.  Evaluating the quality of class participation is necessarily subjective. It is based on the direct substantive contribution of the participation, and on the indirect indicators of quality participation. The significance of substantive ("content") contributions will be evaluated relative to the context of the assignment and class discussion. It is also useful to think about criteria that are used in evaluating process-oriented aspects of class participation. These are summarized by the following set of ques­tions:


 1.       Is the participant a good listener?


2.       Are the points made … or questions raised … relevant to the discussion?


3.       Are the points linked to the comments of others, but not just a restatement of a point that has already been made?


4.       Do comments show evidence of thorough analysis of the assignment?


5.       Do comments contribute to our understanding of the situation?


6.       Is there a willingness to participate?


7.       Is there a willingness to test new ideas or are all comments "safe" (e.g. repetition of assignment facts without analysis and conclusions?)


8.       Do comments show an understanding of theories, concepts, and analytical devices presented in class lectures or assigned reading materi­als?


9.       Do comments and questions reflect a critical but open-minded weighing of alternative and sometime conflicting points of view, or are they limited to advocacy of previously held be­liefs?


GROUP PARTICIPATION CRITIQUES;    Its peers and I will evaluate the group. Each member of the group will be provided with a peer group evalua­tion form. This form reflec­ts the group dynamics and each member's partici­pa­tion.    Each member of the group is to evaluate the group's performance, as a whole and individual­ly.  These peer evaluation forms are for my own use and will be kept entirely confiden­tial.   I will be the only person to see these forms.     Each member of the group is required to com­plete one of these forms. The forms are to be given to me the day the group makes the presenta­tion. If you do not complete and hand in a peer evaluation form on the day of the presenta­tion, you will lose one letter grade on your presenta­tion.


Attachments:
PARKPEERCRITIQUE.doc

PARKMARKETINGORALPRESENTATIONEVALUATION.doc

PARKGROUPPROJECT..doc

Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
2,5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
The student's case analysis demonstrates the student's ability to analyze six or more alternative solutions.  The student will choose what they consider best alternative for solving the case and show how to implement their one best alternative. The student's case analysis demonstrates the student's ability to analyze four or five alternative solutions that will solve the case.  The student will pick their best alternative for solving the case. The case analysis demonstrates the student's ability to analyze two or three alternative solutions.  The student will pick an alternative for solving the case. The case analysis does not show the student's ability to analyze alternative solutions. 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1,2,3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
The student's case analysis demonstrates the student's ability to synthesize information from the case and from at least six other professional sources. The student's case analysis demonstrates his/her ability to synthesize information from the case and from four or five professional sources. The case analysis demonstrates the student's ability to synthesize information from the case and from three professional sources. The case analysis fails to demonstrate the student's ability to synthesize information from the case. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1,2,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
The student's case analysis demonstrates the student's ability to identify and analyze six or more alternative solutions that could potentially solve the case. The case analysis demonstrates the student's ability to identify and analyze four or five alternative solutions that could solve the case. The case analysis demonstrates the student's ability to identify and analyze two or three alternative solutions.  The student will pick an alternative for solving the case. The student's case analysis does not analyze alternative solutions and just retells the details of the case. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1,2,3,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
The case analysis demonstrates the student's ability to apply marketing principles. The case analysis demonstrates the student's ability to apply marketing principles in a basic way. The case analysis shows the student's ability to apply a few marketing principles. The case analysis not show the student's ability to apply the marketing terms. 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1,2,3,4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Correctly demonstrates a comprehensive understanding of marketing terminology. The student demonstrates a basic understanding of marketing terminology.  One or two errors in terminology are acceptable. The student often demonstrates a basic understanding of marketing terminology.  Three or four errors are noted. The student does not show a basic understanding of the terminology of marketing.  Five or more errors are noted. 
Disciplinary Competency                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Outcomes
3,4,5,6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
The case analysis shows excellent knowledge of marketing and includes four or more examples of correct marketing terminology. The case analysis shows good knowledge of marketing and includes three examples of correct marketing terminology. The case analysis shows basic knowledge of marketing and includes two examples of correct marketing terminology. The case analysis does not show basic knowledge of marketing and includes one or fewer examples of correct marketing terminology. 
Disciplinary Competency                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Outcomes
1,2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
The case analysis shows excellent knowledge of the marketing management functions and the marketing mix. The case analysis shows good knowledge of the marketing functions and the marketing mix. The case analysis shows basic knowledge of the marketing functions and the marketing mix. The case analysis does not show basic knowledge of the marketing functions and the marketing mix. 

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Last Updated:12/9/2008 3:25:37 PM