Syllabus Entrance
Printer Friendly
Email Syllabus

PA 602 Seminar in Public Affairs
DiPadova-Stocks, Laurie N.


COURSE SYMBOL AND NUMBER: PA 602

COURSE TITLE: Seminar in Public Affairs

TERM COURSE BEING TAUGHT:  FAP 2004

NAME OF FACULTY MEMBER: Laurie DiPadova-Stocks, Ph.D.

TITLE OF FACULTY MEMBER: Director, Hauptmann School for Public Affairs and Associate Professor of Public Affairs

FACULTY OFFICE HOURS: 4:00 - 5:00 p.m. CT on Mondays before class and by appointment

FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONE NUMBER: (816) 421-1125 ext. 237

FACULTY PARK EMAIL ADDRESS: L.DiPadovaStocks@pirate.park.edu

OTHER FACULTY EMAIL ADDRESS: ldipadovastocks@park.edu

DATES OF THE TERM:  8/23/2004 – 12/19/2004

CLASS SESSIONS DAYS: Mondays

CLASS SESSION TIME: 5:45-8:15 PM

PREREQUISITE(S): 21 hours academic credit and completion or enrollment in PA 601

CREDIT HOURS: 3

 

PARK UNIVERSITY MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

 

PARK UNIVERSITY VISION STATEMENT

Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

 

Hauptmann School for Public Affairs Mission Statement

The mission of the Hauptmann School for Public Affairs is to offer a professional program of student, founded on the liberal arts tradition, that provides its graduates with the knowledge, skills, and values that are necessary for leadership and servi8ce to government, business, and nonprofit sectors of society.

 

Hauptmann School for Public Affairs Vision Statement

Graduates of the Hauptmann School for Public Affairs will be professionals who have learned to integrate theory with application and become leaders in improving management in government, business, and nonprofit sectors of society.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: A seminar aiming at correlation of the academic and practical experiences of the degree candidates. Each student will prepare a series of papers emphasizing various expectations to be faced in professional work, such as analysis, critique, evaluation, implementation, and research.

 

FACULTY’S EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY:  Each person in this class, including the instructor, is a participant in a free and democratic society.  The United States is the oldest representative democracy on earth.  Faculty in higher education have a responsibility to consider the content of their course and academic discipline within the context of issues related to work in a democracy and associated civic responsibility within a global reality.  At the Hauptmann School, we recognize that we are helping to prepare leaders in our democracy.  Further, recognizing that the class is comprised of adult learners, the instructor facilitates intelligent discussion of key issues rather than lecturing in a traditional sense.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this course, students should:

  • Demonstrate the ability to analyze, critique, and evaluate current issues in public affairs;
  • Demonstrate the ability to research potential answers to such issues and how to implement those answers;
  • Improve the ability to raise meaningful questions in a succinct fashion;
  • Encourage critical attitudes toward the views of authorities and of other students;
  • Demonstrate the ability to write critically and effectively;
  • Build awareness of the ethical dimensions of public affairs.

COURSE TEXTBOOK(S): Eugene Bardach, Getting Agencies to Work Together, Washington D.C.: Brookings Institution Press, 1998, ISBN 0-8157-0797-5.

Robert B. Denhardt, Janet Vinzant Denhardt, & Maria P. Aristigueta, Managing Human Behavior in Public & Nonprofit Organizations, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2002, ISBN 0-7619-2474-4.

Alex Pattakos, Prisoners of Our Thoughts, San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler, 2004, ISBN 1-57675-288-7.

Terrel L. Rhodes, ed., The Public Manager Case Book, Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2002, ISBN 0-7619-2327-6.

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY: “Academic Honesty is required of all members of a learning community.  Hence, Park will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers or other course assignments.  Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from Park.”

 

PLAGIARISM: Plagiarism—the appropriation or imitation of the language or ideas of another person and presenting them as one’s original work—sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance.  Students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their instructors.”

 

ACADEMIC NORMS FOR CITATIONS

Graduate students of Park University's Hauptmann School of Public Affairs are expected to be familiar with and follow consistently one of the three widely accepted norms for citations of other texts, articles or online resources and for preparing a bibliography.

I specifically request students to identify, when they submit their first paper with citations and again with the submission of the research paper, which standard they have chosen to follow in making citations. 

 

The most widely used citation systems are the following:

·        Thurabian, Kate. A.  A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations.. 6th Edition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997. (Earlier or later editions may be used.)

·        Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers.. 6th Edition.  New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 2003.  (Website is: www.mla.org)

·        American Psychological Association. Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. 5th Edition.  Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2001. (Web site: www.apastyle.org)

·        Some dictionaries, e.g., THE AMERICAN HERITAGE DICTIONARY, have a style book and section on footnotes and bibliography.

NOTE: you may find an online summary of these different styles at: http://www.researchnavigator.com/content/research_process/citing_sources/

or simply go to www.researchnavigator.com and follow the prompts.

 

SPECIAL REQUESTS AND REMINDERS:

 

1. It is understood that sometimes class attendance is not possible due to serious unexpected events. If you find that you have to miss a class, obtain notes from class members.  You are responsible for learning from what transpires in class, regardless of absence.  Feel free to contact me if you have additional questions.  Be aware that this is an intensive graduate seminar with a unique format that necessitates regular class participation. 

2.  Cell phones and pagers must be turned to the off position during class.

3.  A picture is needed from each student; please bring to class at earliest convenience.

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Instructors are required to keep attendance records and report absences.  The instructor may excuse absences for cogent reasons, but missed work must be made up within the term of enrollment.  Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.  In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of “F”.  An Incomplete will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.  Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance (TA) or Veterans Administration (VA) educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.  Reports of F grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for students receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

 

LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS: Written assignments are to be turned in at the beginning of the class they are due.  Any assignment received by the instructor after the beginning of class will receive reduced points.  For each day late, additional points will be deducted.

 

COURSE ASSESSMENT: Class participation, papers, and weekly essays

 

COURSE Format:  Lectures, discussions, exercises, cases, debates, and role-plays.  The course is conducted as a highly interactive graduate seminar.  Students are expected to participate actively in informed discussions, and learning experiences, thereby merging theory and practice.  Very intentionally, the structure of the course will emerge from the dynamics of the class, and therefore some of the scheduling may be approximate.  The pace at which we progress through the syllabus may be affected by, for example, decisions the class makes, how involved we get in particular topics, etc. 

 

CLASSROOM RULES OF CONDUCT: Attend class regularly and be prompt it will be a part of your grade. 

Class Discussion is mandatory and part of your grade.  During the course, each student will be called upon and required to discuss their analysis of court cases from the text – you will be expected to be prepared and points will be deducted if you are not. 

 

GRADING POLICY

Grading criteria: Grades for the course will be based on the following factors and weighting:

·        Your understanding of the assigned readings, evidenced by your ability to analyze and communicate through the different writing assignments given weekly

·        Your collaborative participation in the class discussions

·        Your ability to identify resources and to research evidenced by your completion of the final assignment.

·        The research report is the equivalent of a final examination. As this is a graduate seminar type class, there will be no proctored examination. 

·        Completing a three credit hour course, in a graduate seminar setting, without a final examination, means that greater attention than in some other course settings must be given to dedicated, intelligent participation in the course from the very beginning. Stay ahead with the reading and writing assignments.  Reread over your written assignments carefully before submission. There are no "perfect answers" around policy.  But be ready to explain what you mean and know on what you are basing your views.

 

DISABILITY GUIDELINES: Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance.  These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal.  It is Park University’s policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.  Additional information concerning Park University’s policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: www.park.edu/disability .

 

DEBATE:  Is the American democracy working?

 

Negative position:  No.  A democracy that works for the few is not, by definition, a democracy.  It is clear that this democracy works for the wealthy but not for others. We are the only industrialized nation that has not figured out how to provide health care for all citizens.  We have not figured our how to educate our children in safe buildings.  The disparity (economic, opportunity, and access) in this nation to basic services and privileges is clearly violating the premise that our government is “of the people, by the people, and for the people.”

 

Affirmative position:  Of course our democracy is working.  We are tremendously prosperous and powerful in the world.  We get the government we vote into office.  If we do not like it, we can vote differently. This is what democracy is about.  The majority prefers the government we have.  People are not protesting in the streets.  This nation is a nation of privilege.  Citizens have been participating and they have voted for the current administration and its policies. We have the government that is of our own making.

 

COURSE TOPICS/DATES/ASSIGNMENTS:

Week

Date

Reading Assignments

1

8/23 – 8/29

Read Denhardt et al, Chapters 1-3.  Essay due 8/30:  Consider yourself within the Competing Values Framework of Organizational Effectiveness.  Examine your strengths and weaknesses.  Does the profile more or less match your understanding of yourself?  Considering the profile and your own self-reflection, what are your areas of strength? Weakness?  What have you learned about organizational effectiveness as a result? How does this relate to the reading in Denhardt?  Relate the CVF to a concept from a previous MPA course.

2-3

8/30 – 9/12

No class 9/6: Labor Day

Read Denhardt et al, Chapters 4-10.  Essay due 9/13: Answer the Week Two-Three discussion question: "Identify a central theme from this week's reading assignment and relate it to a concept you learned during a previous MPA course."

4

9/13 – 9/19

Read Denhardt et al, Chapters 11-14.  Essay due 9/20:  Answer the Week Four discussion question: "Identify a central theme from this week's reading assignment and relate it to a concept you learned during a previous MPA course."
c) Please complete the Analysis Paper, due 9/20.  Your paper must include the following sections:
(1) CENTRAL THEME.  What is the central theme of the Denhardt et al book?  This segment of the paper may not exceed one typewritten page in length.
(2) IMPLICATIONS. How does this book assist you in understanding your professional experiences and involvements?
(3) UTILIZATION.  How would you use the analysis of this book in your future professional activities?

5

9/20 – 9/26

Read Bardach, Chapters 1-2.  Essay due 9/27: Answer the Week Five discussion question: "Identify a central theme from this week's reading assignment and relate it to a concept you learned during a previous MPA course."

6

9/27 – 10/3

Read Bardach, Chapters 3-4.  Essay due 10/4: Answer the Week Six discussion question: "Identify a central theme from this week's reading assignment and relate it to a concept you learned during a previous MPA course."

7

10/4 – 10/10

 Read Bardach, Chapters 5-7.  Essay due 10/11: Answer the Week Seven discussion question: "Identify a central theme from this week's reading assignment and relate it to a concept you learned during a previous MPA course."

8-9

10/11 – 10/24

No class 10/18—fall recess

Read Bardach, Chapters 8-9.  Essay due 10/25.  Answer the Week Eight discussion question: "Identify a central theme from this week's reading assignment and relate it to a concept you learned during a previous MPA course.”  Please complete the Critique Paper, due 10/25. Your paper must include the following sections:
(1) CENTRAL THEME.  What is the central theme of the Bardach book?  This segment of the paper may not exceed one typewritten page in length.
(2) CRITIQUE. Did you agree with the author's point of view?  Why or why not?
Note: Additional sources (research) agreeing or disagreeing with the textbook and/or the presenter have to be included.

10

10/25 – 10/31

Read Rhodes, Chapters 1-2.  Essay due 11/1: Answer the Week Ten discussion question: "Identify a central theme from this week's reading assignment and relate it to a concept you learned during a previous MPA course."

11

11/1 – 11/7

Read Rhodes, Chapters 3-4 Essay due 11/8.  Answer the Week Eleven discussion question: "Identify a central theme from this week's reading assignment and relate it to a concept you learned during a previous MPA course."

12

11/8 – 11/14

Read Rhodes, Chapters 5-6. Essay due 11/15:  Answer the Week Twelve discussion question: "Identify a central theme from this week's reading assignment and relate it to a concept you learned during a previous MPA course."

13

11/15 – 11/21

Read Rhodes, Chapters 7-8.  Essay due 11/22.  Answer the Week Thirteen discussion question: "Identify a central theme from this week's reading assignment and relate it to a concept you learned during a previous MPA course."
c) Please complete the Practice Paper.  Your paper must include the following sections:
(1) CENTRAL THEME.  What is the central theme of the Rhodes
book?  This segment of the paper may not exceed one typewritten page in length.
(2) IMPLICATIONS. Which of the cases contained in this book was the most relevant for you?  Why?
(3) UTILIZATION.  How would you apply the cases found in this book in your future professional activities?

14

11/22 – 11/28

Read Pattakos, Chapters 1-5.  Essay due 11/29: Answer the Week Fourteen discussion question: "Identify a central theme from this week's reading assignment and relate it to a concept you learned during a previous MPA course."

15

11/29 – 12/5

Read Pattakos, Chapters 6-11.  Essay due 12/6: Answer the Week Fifteen discussion question: "Identify a central theme from this week's reading assignment and relate it to a concept you learned during a previous MPA course." Please complete the Evaluation Paper.  Your paper must include the following sections:
(1) CENTRAL THEME.  What is the central theme of the Pattakos book?  This segment of the paper may not exceed one typewritten page in length.
(2) EVALUATION. Identify a weak or controversial aspect in this book.  Why did you select this aspect?  
(3) PUBLIC AFFAIRS IMPLICATIONS.  Public affairs is understood by the Hauptmann School of Public Affairs to be the field of study which shows the interrelationships between the activities of government (on all its levels) with other elements of the social and economic systems.  What impact might the selected aspect have on your understanding of public affairs?

 

 

 

16

12/13

LAST DAY OF CLASS.  Debate will be held.  Debate position research paper is due.  Please complete the paper, adhering to these procedures:

  1. Select a narrow topic within the Is the American Democracy Working? issue.  If your topic relates to the emphasis area of your study (Public Management, Government/Business Relations, Nonprofit and Community Services Management, MIS, or Health Management), then use that relationship.
    (1) The selection is up to the student, but the instructor may be consulted.
    (2) Prepare an annotated bibliography of research sources on the selected subject using at least:
      (a)  three books,
      (b)  two professional articles (e.g., from a professional journal),
      (c) one additional source.

(B) Write your  research report according to the outline below.
Your paper must include the following sections:
1. A paragraph length statement of the RATIONALE for the topic selection.
2. An ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY of the sources used.  Remember that possibly only parts of any sources may be used and that this has to be indicated.  Watch the proper order of bibliographical listings.
3.  Statement of the CENTRAL THEME found in the sources used.
4. A discussion of the possible UTILIZATION of the results of this report which must include at least 2 (two) properly identified footnotes (or endnotes) referring to the bibliographical entries.

5.  Discuss the process of working with your debate team members.  What dynamics and procedures worked well for your group and which did not work so well?  If you were teaching this course next term, what aspects of the debate process would you keep and which would you change?

 

GRADING PLAN:

The following weights will be assigned to the course requirements:

 

Class Participation – 25%                                                                     250 points

Debate Position Research Paper – 20%                                                200 points

*Weekly Essays  – 15%                                                                       150 total points

Analysis Paper (Denhardt) – 10%                                                         100 points

Critique Paper (Bardach) – 10%                                                           100 points

Practice Paper (Rhodes) – 10%                                                            100 points

Evaluation Paper (Pattakos) – 10%                                                       100 points

 

*Resubmit all original weekly essays (with my markings on them) along with any rewrites.  Students are free to rewrite any or all of them, especially considering the topics and their comments within the context of the entire course.  FINAL DUE DATE for these is December 13, 2004.

Grading Scale

Final grades will be computed based on the following point scale:
900-1000: A
800-899: B
700-799: C
600-699: D
0-599: F

In addition, any student who misses three classes, regardless of whether or not the absence is excused, will be administratively withdrawn.