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CH 108 Intro to Chemistry II
Claycomb, Gregory D.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CH 108 Intro to Chemistry II

Semester

UJL 2009 HO

Faculty

Claycomb, Gregory D.

Title

Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Degrees/Certificates

Ph.D.

Office Location

SC 305

Office Hours

Monday - Thursday;  2:00 pm to 4:00 pm

Daytime Phone

816-584-6338

E-Mail

gregory.claycomb@park.edu

Semester Dates

July 6th - July 30th

Class Days

-MTWR--

Class Time

8:00 - 10:15 AM

Prerequisites

'C' or better in CH107

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Chang, Raymond  "Chemistry, 9th Ed." published by McGraw-Hill 2007

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
A continuation of CH107 with major topics covered including solutions, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, equilibria, and an introduction to descriptive chemistry. Co requisite: CH108L . 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
The instructor's educational philosophy is one of interactiveness based on lectures, demonstrations, and discussions. Lecture material is re-enforced by reading and homework assignments, as well as laboratory investigations. Student learning will be evaluated by quizzes taken directly from homework assignments, and weekly examinations.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe = solutions, solubility, colligative properties (perform calculations of these properties), and colloid formation.
  2. Apply the = kinetic theory to a chemical reaction and perform calculations using the = rate laws and transition energy.
  3. Write = simple reaction mechanisms and describe the function of = catalysts.
  4. Describe = equilibrium and estimate equilibrium information.
  5. Describe = acid-base concept, assess acid and base strength, describe and perform = calculations on weak acids and bases, buffer solutions, and salts of weak acids = and bases and determine pH.
  6. Explain = and apply the first law of thermodynamics.
  7. Describe = and perform calculations on voltaic and electrolytic = cells.
  8. Describe = reactions and trends of the main group elements and nuclear decay and = reactions.
  9. Relate = and apply scientific methods to chemical situations and scientific = literature.


Core Assessment:
70% of the final exam
 
 

UNDERGRADUATE CORE  ASSESSMENT  RUBRIC  (CAR) 2006-2007

  Course Name and Number: CH108 Introduction to Chemistry II

Assessment tool: 70% of the final exam 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Competency

Exceeds Expectation

(3)

Meets Expectation

(2)

Does Not Meet Expectation 

(1)

No Evidence 

(0)

 

 

Critical thinking and effective communication are included

 in the University’s mission statement as well as in the literacies.

Critical Thinking

 

Please define the following four elements of critical thinking as broadly as needed to assess student learning in your course. Be as creative as possible about how critical thinking is demonstrated in your discipline. Please indicate which outcome demonstrates which element of critical thinking. Identifying outcomes that relate to the various elements of critical thinking shows the ways in which students demonstrate their ability.  Therefore, a distinct level of student performance should be included in each box.

Evaluation

outcome(s)

1, 2, 4, 6, 7

·   Assess a problem in kinetics to determine what information is known/unknown, relevant/extraneous, and derive the necessary equations

·   Assess a problem in solution chemistry and determine the type of problem (colligative property, concentration, acid/base, equilibrium) and equations needed to solve the problem. 

·   Assess a problem in equilibrium to determine what type of equilibrium (acid/base, buffer, solubility, complex-ion), relevant information, and necessary equations to solve the problem.

·   Assess a problem in electrochemistry to determine type of cell (and be able to draw cell showing all components), evaluate information given and what is needed, and determine and/or derive equations necessary to solve the problem.

·   Balance REDOX equations in neutral, acidic, and basic solutions and apply to electrochemical cells.

·   Draw and explain an electrochemical cell

·    Evaluate Gibbs free energy using the Nernst Equation, Free energy tables, and entropy-enthalpy tables.

·   Assess a problem in kinetics to determine what information is known/unknown, relevant/extraneous, and choose the necessary equations

·   Assess a problem in solution chemistry and determine the type of problem (3 from: colligative property, concentration, acid/base, equilibrium) and equations needed to solve the problem. 

·   Assess a problem in equilibrium to determine what type of equilibrium (3 from: acid/base, buffer, solubility, complex-ion), relevant information, and necessary equations to solve the problem.

·   Assess a problem in electrochemistry to determine type of cell (and be able to draw cell showing all components), evaluate information given and what is needed, and determine the equations necessary to solve the problem.

·   Balance REDOX equations in neutral, acidic solution and apply to electrochemical cells and thermodynamics.

·   Draw and explain an electrochemical cell

·    Evaluate Gibbs free energy using the Nernst Equation, Free energy tables, and entropy-enthalpy tables.

·    

·   Assess a problem in kinetics to determine what information is known/unknown and choose the necessary equations

·   Assess a problem in solution chemistry and determine the type of problem (2 from: colligative property, concentration, acid/base, equilibrium) and equations needed to solve the problem. 

·   Assess a problem in equilibrium to determine what type of equilibrium (2 from: acid/base, buffer, solubility, complex-ion), relevant information, and necessary equations to solve the problem.

·   Assess a problem in electrochemistry to determine type of cell (and be able to draw cell showing all components), evaluate information given and determine the equations necessary to solve the problem.

·   Balance REDOX equations in neutral solution and apply to electrochemical cells and thermodynamics.

·   Draw and explain an electrochemical cell

·    Evaluate Gibbs free energy using the Nernst Equation, Free energy tables or entropy-enthalpy tables.

·    

·   Assess a problem in kinetics to determine what information is known/unknown and choose the necessary equations

·   Assess a problem in solution chemistry and determine the type of problem (1 from: colligative property, concentration, acid/base, equilibrium) and equations needed to solve the problem. 

·   Assess a problem in equilibrium to determine what type of equilibrium (1 from: acid/base, buffer, solubility, complex-ion), relevant information, and necessary equations to solve the problem.

·   Be able to draw cell an electrochemical cell showing all components), evaluate information given and determine the equations necessary to solve the problem.

·   Balance REDOX equations in neutral solution.

·   Draw and explain an electrochemical cell

·    Evaluate Gibbs free energy using Free energy tables.

·    

Synthesis

outcome(s)

1, 2, 3, 4, 7

·     Determine the rate of a reaction graphically and using initial rates

·   Show how the rate is dependent on concentration by deriving the necessary equations, propose a mechanism for a set of appropriate equations for a given problem

·   Mathematically manipulate a set of appropriate equations to fit the desired kinetic theory outcome and the information given

·   Combine equations showing how physical properties (MW, concentration, etc) can be determined from colligative properties.

·   Combine relevant equations in equilibria to obtain the solution to given questions. 

·   Combine the Nernst equation with those of equilibria and/or thermodynamics to obtain the solution to question.

·     Determine the rate of a reaction graphically or using initial rates

·   Use equations that relate the rate to concentration

·    propose a mechanism for a set of appropriate equations for a given problem

·   Mathematically manipulate a set of appropriate equations to fit the desired kinetic theory outcome and the information given

·   Use equations that show how physical properties (MW, concentration, etc) can be determined from colligative properties.

·   Combine relevant equations in equilibria to obtain the solution to given questions. 

·   Combine the Nernst equation with those of equilibria and/or thermodynamics to obtain the solution to question.

Do five of these:

·     Determine the rate of a reaction graphically or using initial rates

·   Use equations that relate the rate to concentration

·    propose a mechanism for a set of appropriate equations for a given problem

·   Mathematically manipulate a set of appropriate equations to fit the desired kinetic theory outcome and the information given

·   Use equations that show how physical properties (MW, concentration, etc) can be determined from colligative properties.

·   Combine relevant equations in equilibria to obtain the solution to given questions. 

·   Combine the Nernst equation with those of equilibria and/or thermodynamics to obtain the solution to question.

Do three of these:

·     Determine the rate of a reaction graphically or using initial rates

·   Use equations that relate the rate to concentration

·    propose a mechanism for a set of appropriate equations for a given problem

·   Mathematically manipulate a set of appropriate equations to fit the desired kinetic theory outcome and the information given

·   Use equations that show how physical properties (MW, concentration, etc) can be determined from colligative properties.

·   Combine relevant equations in equilibria to obtain the solution to given questions. 

·   Combine the Nernst equation with those of equilibria and/or thermodynamics to obtain the solution to question.

Analysis

outcome(s)

2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

·   Determine the rate law for a given set of data

·   Propose kinetic mechanisms

·   Relate the half-life of a reaction to the rate constant

·   Use the Arrhenius equation and use graphic interpretation

·    Write equilibrium-constant expressions

·   Identify acid and base species

·   Identify Lewis acid/base

·   Write solubility product expressions

·   Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials

·   Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials.

·   Predict the half-reaction in aqueous electrolysis

·   Analyze the outcome of a reaction predicted by  DG.

Be able to do nine of:

·   Determine the rate law for a given set of data

·   Propose kinetic mechanisms

·   Relate the half-life of a reaction to the rate constant

·   Use the Arrhenius equation and use graphic interpretation

·    Write equilibrium-constant expressions

·   Identify acid and base species

·   Identify Lewis acid/base

·   Write solubility product expressions

·   Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials

·   Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials.

·   Predict the half-reaction in aqueous electrolysis

·   Analyze the outcome of a reaction predicted by  DG.

Be able to do seven of:

·   Determine the rate law for a given set of data

·   Propose kinetic mechanisms

·   Relate the half-life of a reaction to the rate constant

·   Use the Arrhenius equation and use graphic interpretation

·    Write equilibrium-constant expressions

·   Identify acid and base species

·   Identify Lewis acid/base

·   Write solubility product expressions

·   Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials

·   Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials.

·   Predict the half-reaction in aqueous electrolysis

Be able to do five of:

·   Determine the rate law for a given set of data

·   Propose kinetic mechanisms

·   Relate the half-life of a reaction to the rate constant

·   Use the Arrhenius equation and use graphic interpretation

·    Write equilibrium-constant expressions

·   Identify acid and base species

·   Identify Lewis acid/base

·   Write solubility product expressions

·   Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials

·   Determine the direction of spontaneity from electrode potentials.

·   Predict the half-reaction in aqueous electrolysis

Application

outcome(s)

2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

·   Write the mechanism for a multi-step reaction

·   Calculate solution concentration

·   Convert concentration units

·   Calculate vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression, osmotic pressure, molecular weights

·   Determine colligative properties of ionic solutions

·   Apply stoichiometry to an equilibrium mixture

·   Obtain an equilibrium constant from reaction composition

·   Obtain one equil. conc. Given the others and K.

·   Calculate [H+], [OH--], and pH

·   Determine Ka or Kb from the solution pH

·   Calculate concentrations of species in a weak acid (or base) using Ka or Kb+.

·   Predict whether a salt solution is acidic, basic, or neutral

·   Calculate concentration of species in a salt solution

·   Calculate the common-ion effect on acid ionization.

·   Calculate the p H of a buffer solution, of a buffer when a strong acid or strong base is added, at the equivalence point in the titration of a weak acid by a strong base.

·   Calculate Ksp from the solubility, or vice versa

·   Calculate the solubility of a slightly soluble salt in a solution of a common ion

·   Predict whether precipitation will occur

·   Separate metal ions by sulfide precipitation

·   Calculate the emf and Gibb’s Free Energy change from standard potentials

·   Calculate the equilibrium constant from cell emf

Be able to do 19 of the following:

·   Write the mechanism for a multi-step reaction

·   Calculate solution concentration

·   Convert concentration units

·   Calculate vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression, osmotic pressure, molecular weights

·   Determine colligative properties of ionic solutions

·   Apply stoichiometry to an equilibrium mixture

·   Obtain an equilibrium constant from reaction composition

·   Obtain one equil. conc. Given the others and K.

·   Calculate [H+], [OH--], and pH

·   Determine Ka or Kb from the solution pH

·   Calculate concentrations of species in a weak acid (or base) using Ka or Kb+.

·   Predict whether a salt solution is acidic, basic, or neutral

·   Calculate concentration of species in a salt solution

·   Calculate the common-ion effect on acid ionization.

·   Calculate the p H of a buffer solution, of a buffer when a strong acid or strong base is added, at the equivalence point in the titration of a weak acid by a strong base.

·   Calculate Ksp from the solubility, or vice versa

·   Calculate the solubility of a slightly soluble salt in a solution of a common ion

·   Predict whether precipitation will occur

·   Separate metal ions by sulfide precipitation

·   Calculate the emf and Gibb’s Free Energy change from standard potentials

·   Calculate the equilibrium constant from cell emf

Be able to do 16 of the following:

·   Write the mechanism for a multi-step reaction

·   Calculate solution concentration

·   Convert concentration units

·   Calculate vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression, osmotic pressure, molecular weights

·   Determine colligative properties of ionic solutions

·   Apply stoichiometry to an equilibrium mixture

·   Obtain an equilibrium constant from reaction composition

·   Obtain one equil. conc. Given the others and K.

·   Calculate [H+], [OH--], and pH

·   Determine Ka or Kb from the solution pH

·   Calculate concentrations of species in a weak acid (or base) using Ka or Kb+.

·   Predict whether a salt solution is acidic, basic, or neutral

·   Calculate concentration of species in a salt solution

·   Calculate the common-ion effect on acid ionization.

·   Calculate the p H of a buffer solution, of a buffer when a strong acid or strong base is added, at the equivalence point in the titration of a weak acid by a strong base.

·   Calculate Ksp from the solubility, or vice versa

·   Calculate the solubility of a slightly soluble salt in a solution of a common ion

·   Predict whether precipitation will occur

·   Separate metal ions by sulfide precipitation

·   Calculate the emf and Gibb’s Free Energy change from standard potentials

Calculate the equilibrium constant from cell emf

Be able to do 13 of the following:

·   Write the mechanism for a multi-step reaction

·   Calculate solution concentration

·   Convert concentration units

·   Calculate vapor pressure lowering, boiling point elevation, freezing point depression, osmotic pressure, molecular weights

·   Determine colligative properties of ionic solutions

·   Apply stoichiometry to an equilibrium mixture

·   Obtain an equilibrium constant from reaction composition

·   Obtain one equil. conc. Given the others and K.

·   Calculate [H+], [OH--], and pH

·   Determine Ka or Kb from the solution pH

·   Calculate concentrations of species in a weak acid (or base) using Ka or Kb+.

·   Predict whether a salt solution is acidic, basic, or neutral

·   Calculate concentration of species in a salt solution

·   Calculate the common-ion effect on acid ionization.

·   Calculate the p H of a buffer solution, of a buffer when a strong acid or strong base is added, at the equivalence point in the titration of a weak acid by a strong base.

·   Calculate Ksp from the solubility, or vice versa

·   Calculate the solubility of a slightly soluble salt in a solution of a common ion

·   Predict whether precipitation will occur

·   Separate metal ions by sulfide precipitation

·   Calculate the emf and Gibb’s Free Energy change from standard potentials

Calculate the equilibrium constant from cell emf

Effective Communication

Please define communication in terms of content and skills as appropriate for the course, and identify outcomes accordingly.

Content of Communication

outcome(s)

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Illustrate a complete understanding of a problem by neatly and in an orderly manner present the solution showing equations, derivations, insertions, and explaining all steps.

Illustrate an understanding of a problem by neatly and in an orderly manner present the solution showing equations, insertions, and derivations.

Illustrate an understanding of a problem by neatly and in an orderly manner present the solution showing equations and insertions.

Illustrate an understanding of a problem by neatly and in an orderly manner present the solution showing insertions in an unspecified equation.

Technical Skill in Communicating

outcome(s)

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Interpret graphical representation of data

Create spread sheets to evaluate data

Graph data

Interpret graphical representation of data

Create spread sheets to evaluate data

Graph data

Interpret graphical representation of data

Graph data

Graph data


Competency

Exceeds Expectation

(3)

Meets Expectation

(2)

Does Not Meet Expectation 

(1)

No Evidence 

(0)

 

Other Literacies

(or Disciplinary Competency)

If this rubric is for a GE course, please include outcomes for at least CIVIC and VALUES literacies.  LL courses must include INTERDISCIPLINARY and CONTEMPORARY TOPIC outcomes. MGE and MLL courses must have a MULTICULTURAL component. 

If this rubric is for a course in a major/degree program (non-GE/LL), please identify two outcomes for discipline-specific competencies appropriate for the course (i.e. defined at the course level).

First Literacy

(or Disciplinary Competency)

    8

·   Demonstrate a knowledge of inorganic and organic nomenclature

·   Demonstrate a complete knowledge of the periodic table

·   Demonstrate a knowledge of inorganic nomenclature (nonmetals and metals)

·   Demonstrate a knowledge of periodic trends

·   Demonstrate a knowledge of inorganic nomenclature (metals)

·   Demonstrate a knowledge of two periodic trends

·   Demonstrate a knowledge of atomic names.

·   Demonstrate a knowledge of one periodic trend

Second Literacy

 (or Disciplinary Competency)

      7

Demonstrate the ability to make and dilute solutions quantitatively and perform the necessary calculations for any concentration

Demonstrate the ability to make and dilute solutions quantitatively and perform the necessary calculations for molarity, molality, and normality

Demonstrate the ability to make and dilute solutions quantitatively and perform the necessary calculations for molarity

Demonstrate the ability to make and dilute solutions

Class Assessment:

1. Read the textbook: each student is expected to read the textbook carfully, and critically.
 
2. Homework/Quizzes: the best way to learn chemistry is to work problems. Homework problems will be assigned, and quizzes will be given to ensure that the assignments are being completed.
 
3. Exams: it will be extremely difficult to pass this course without taking all 4 exams. Exams will consist of multiple choice questions. All of the pertinant equations and constants will be provided with each exam. You will be allowed to use a non-progammable scientific calculator. Make-up exams will be given only if the student contacts the instructor prior to the exam with a reasonable excuse (medical, death of an immediate family member).

Grading:

One Hour Exams                       300 points
Comprehensive Final Exam        200 points
Homework/Quizzes                     75 points
Total                                         575 points
 
The grade scale will be as follows: 91-100%=A, 81-90%=B, 71-80%=C, 61-70%=D, below 61%=F. However, depending on class performance, the grade scale may be adjusted at the end of the semester.

Late Submission of Course Materials:
The instructor will not accept late assignments.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Cell phones must be turned off during class.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Week -1
M     Chapter 11
T      Chapters 11 and 12
W     Chapters 12
R      Chapter 13, Quiz-1
Week-2
M     Exam-1, Chapter 13
T      Chapters 14 
W     Chapters 14 and 15
R      Chapter 15, Quiz-2
Week-3
M     Exam-2, Chapter 16
T      Chapters 16
W     Chapters 17
R      Chapter 17, Quiz-3
Week-4
M     Exam-3, Chapter 18
T      Chapters 18
W    Chapter 23, Quiz-4
R     Comprehensive Final Exam

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog Page 92

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:

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                               and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:7/1/2009 1:39:39 PM