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SO 303 Urban Sociology
Casstevens, Mary A.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

SO 303 Urban Sociology

Semester

U1T 2009 DL

Faculty

Casstevens, Mary A.

Degrees/Certificates

Bachelor's Texas Tech University
Master's Texas A&M University

Office Location

online

E-Mail

mary.casstevens@park.edu

MCasst8841@aol.com if you use this email you must note Park and class on subject line

Semester Dates

June 1, 2009 - July 26, 2009

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Macionis, John J.  and Vincent N. Parrillo (2007). Cities and Urban Life,4th ed. Pearson Prentice Hall

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

Valerie Gunter and Steve Kroll-Smith (2007).  Volatile Places. Pine Forge
Jay Weinstein and Vijayan K. Pillai (2001). Demography - The Science of Population Allyn and Bacon

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Course Description:
SO 303 Urban Sociology (LL) A study of the development of the city of the social characteristics of urbanization, ecology, social processes, group relations, and selected urban problems.3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:

I am strongly committed to educating students and providing them with a comprehensive education. As a sociologist, I feel it is my responsibility to provide instruction that is multi-faceted to provide students with knowledge and understanding of different perspectives. This type of education will prepare students for life after college as ethical, knowledgeable, and contributory members of society.

I consider being an instructor as the most important role of a professor. I encourage you to reflect on the skill and opportunities that a good education will provide. I feel that a student should articulate their reasons for attending a course to establish goals for attaining knowledge. I believe this helps in developing a productive and reflexive student-instructor relationship.


Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Analyze the nature, historical origins, and changing patterns of urbanization both in American metropolitan areas and around the world, especially comparing differences among cities in the “New World” (North American), “Old World” (European), and developing nations; and understand how local cultures, geography, and demography shape urban, suburban, and exurban development.
  2. Analyze the nature, historical origins, and changing patterns of urbanization both in American metropolitan areas and around the world, especially comparing differences among cities in the “New World” (North American), “Old World” (European), and developing nations; and understand how local cultures, geography, and demography shape urban, suburban, and exurban development.
  3. Critique how urbanization influences values, interpersonal, and inter-group relationships.
  4. Use the neighborhood and civic organizations as units of analysis to better explain urban dynamics.
  5. Evaluate the positive effects of urbanization, including potential access to increased cultural capital and economies of scale, and apply sociological findings to guides policies for their further development.
  6. Evaluate the negative effects of urbanization, including prejudice and discrimination, housing, education, social services, homelessness, and crime, and apply related research to strategies and policies that may help to lessen their effects.
  7. Understand and assess the effects of technology and the changing labor market on 21st-century cities.
  8. Illustrate how urban sociology might be used to anticipate and plan for changes and development in different types of city.


Core Assessment:

SO303: URBAN SOCIOLOGY


Core Assessment (New for July, 2006)


 


GENERAL NOTES


The Core Assessment assignment for this class will be a major essay that integrates, analyzes, applies, and critiques several sociological concepts and research findings from this course individually, together, and with additional sources from your own literature review and archival study.


You must incorporate the findings from at least five outside sources of original academic research in this essay.  You may also include additional sources for examples or background information, but only reputable, peer-reviewed academic sources will count toward the reference requirements of your essays.  This means that magazines, newspapers, professional periodicals, or internet sources are only appropriate for examples and illustrations in this project — if you have any questions as to whether a specific source is acceptable for your essay, you should ask your instructor rather than guess.  Also, focus on articles or books presenting original research or theories, not on those reviewing others' works or editorializing about opposing approaches.  Reference works, textbooks, and literature reviews are all excellent places to begin your search, but you must find and read the original in order to develop your own reaction.  Ask your instructor for source approval if in doubt.


You should also consider incorporating relevant and reputable statistical and other social scientific data collected by researchers, governments, and other agencies and organizations.  A wealth of such archived data is publicly accessible through the Internet, and their use can help you better understand your issue and develop a stronger analysis and critique. Again, if in doubt, ask your instructor for approval of your data source.


If you do not properly cite those external sources that contributed to your work, then you are guilty of plagiarism.  This will not be tolerated and may result in immediate and serious academic penalties.  If you have any questions as to when and how to use citations and references in you essays, please contact your instructor.  Your final essay will also be formatted according to the relevant portions of the American Psychological Association Style Guide.  The main text of your essay will consist of no more than 3,500 words (or about fifteen pages).  While it possible to construct a successful essay in fewer words, this assignment is comprehensive and detailed enough that most students will find it a challenge to successfully address all of its points in the allotted space.  Begin work on your essay early and leave plenty of time for revision to assure the best possible grade.


 


SO303 CORE ASSESSMENT


            Pick one urban problem or issue discussed in this course that is commonly faced in many urban areas, for example: prejudice and discrimination, housing, education, public transportation, other social and public services, unemployment, homelessness, crime, urban sprawl, or another of your choosing (be sure to get your instructor's approval for your chosen focus).  Describe how that problem or issue manifests in two different urban areas of your choosing (domestic or international).  Compare their similarities and contrast their differences.  Explain what ecological, demographic, institutional, social, cultural, and other factors influence the issue.  Use original scholarly research and other reliable data sources to explain and illustrate the phenomenon and its trends over time. One good place to start is the US Federal statistics gateway site: www.fedstats.gov; the UN, www.un.org, and the World Bank, www.worldbank.org, are two additional good sources for international data; the largest clearinghouse for publicly available academic and organizational data is the ICPSR at the University of Michigan, www.icpsr.umich.edu; and the University of Chicago's NORC is one of the largest academic opinion research centers in the country, norc.uchicago.edu.  Consider multiple sources of data, when possible, and compare and contrast the actual data with public perception of the issue.  Pay particular attention to the trends in the data and use sociological concepts and findings from the course and your additional literature review to analyze your issue.  Over time, what aspects of this issue in these urban areas has changed or remained the same?  Why?


Discuss and evaluate the personal and social consequences of this issue for various populations within each urban area.  Examine and evaluate more than one plan or strategy for addressing your problem.  If available, evaluate the relative success of these plans, compare and contrast them, and argue whether a particular approach might be more successful in one urban area than another.  Justify and support your conclusions.  Explain how specific social scientific theories and research helps you to make these decisions.  How might different constituencies within each urban area have interests that work with or against one another?  Why?


Now that you have a clearer and more defensible understanding of the evidence and the mechanisms at work, make a decision: is this truly a problem or not?  If so, for whom, and why?  In either case, what have you learned from your efforts regarding best policies and practices related to the issue? What would be the social and individual consequences if your policy suggestions were implemented?  Finally, what trend do you think we are likely to see in this issue over the next two decades in both of your locations?  Defend and justify your conclusions.  What public policies and individual decisions would help guide this future trend in the most generally useful and beneficial direction?  Defend and justify your conclusions.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Class Assessment:
See detailed instructions and rubrics for all assignments in the SO303 course shell at http://parkonline.org.

Core Assessment(350 points = 28.4%)

The major essay is the core assessment for this class. 

For this core assessment, pick one urban problem or issue discussed in this course that is commonly faced in many urban areas, for example: prejudice and discrimination, housing, education, public transportation, other social and public services, unemployment, homelessness, crime, urban sprawl, or another of your choosing (be sure to get your instructor's approval for your chosen focus). Describe how that problem or issue manifests in two different urban areas of your choosing (domestic or international). Compare their similarities and contrast their differences. Explain what ecological, demographic, institutional, social, cultural, and other factors influence the issue. Use original scholarly research and other reliable data sources to explain and illustrate the phenomenon and its trends over time. One good place to start is the US Federal statistics gateway site: www.fedstats.gov; the UN, www.un.org, and the World Bank, www.worldbank.org, are two additional good sources for international data; the largest clearinghouse for publicly available academic and organizational data is the ICPSR at the University of Michigan, www.icpsr.umich.edu; and the University of Chicago's NORC is one of the largest academic opinion research centers in the country, norc.uchicago.edu. Consider multiple sources of data, when possible, and compare and contrast the actual data with public perception of the issue. Pay particular attention to the trends in the data and use sociological concepts and findings from the course and your additional literature review to analyze your issue. Over time, what aspects of this issue in these urban areas has changed or remained the same? Why?

Discuss and evaluate the personal and social consequences of this issue for various populations within each urban area. Examine and evaluate more than one plan or strategy for addressing your problem. If available, evaluate the relative success of these plans, compare and contrast them, and argue whether a particular approach might be more successful in one urban area than another. Justify and support your conclusions. Explain how specific social scientific theories and research helps you to make these decisions. How might different constituencies within each urban area have interests that work with or against one another? Why?

Now that you have a clearer and more defensible understanding of the evidence and the mechanisms at work, make a decision: is this truly a problem or not? If so, for whom, and why? In either case, what have you learned from your efforts regarding best policies and practices related to the issue? What would be the social and individual consequences if your policy suggestions were implemented? Finally, what trend do you think we are likely to see in this issue over the next two decades in both of your locations? Defend and justify your conclusions. What public policies and individual decisions would help guide this future trend in the most generally useful and beneficial direction? Defend and justify your conclusions.    This assignment is due on the 7th week of class.  Students must clear their topic question with the instructor before starting work on this assignment.  (Students must understand that the major essay assignment IS the major core assessment for this course.) 

Grading:

A multiple choice/essay question midterm examination (200 = 16.2%)

A comprehensive multiple choice/essay question final examination (200 = 16.2%)

Weekly homework assignment (8 x 30 = 240 points = 19.5%)

Weekly discussion and participation (8 x 20 = 160 points = 13.0%)

Weekly quiz over the assigned chapters (8 x 10 = 80 points = 6.5%)


Total Points Possible = 1,230

A = 1,107 and above (90% to 100%)
B = 984 to 1,106        (80% to 89.9%)
C = 861 to 983            (70% to 79.9%)
D = 738 to 860            (60% to 69.9%)
F = 737 and below      (59% and below)
(Total points includes Core Project)

Late Submission of Course Materials:
All assignments are due on or before the date indicated unless students receive expressed permission from the instructor. Any assignment not turned in when it is due will be subject to a 5 point per day penalty until received. The 5 point per day point reduction will occur prior to the assignment being graded. 

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
We will cover a variety of issues in this course. As a result, there may be times when there may be a disagreement with someone else in the class. Disagreements are perfectly acceptable. However, we must disagree in an agreeable fashion. It is never acceptable to attack anyone verbally for their opinion, comment, ideas, beliefs, etc. When responding to the comments of a classmate, begin the response by using the classmate’s name so that everyone is certain of who is being spoken to.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Week              Chapter

1                      1 – Exploring the City and

                        2 – The Origins and Development of the World’s Cities

                        Quiz #1

2                      3 – The Development of North American Cities

                        4 – Cities and Suburbs of the Twenty-First Century

                        Quiz #2

3                      5 – Urban Sociology: Classic and Modern Statements

                        6 – Social Psychology: The Urban Experience

                        Quiz #3

4                      7 – Geography and Spatial Perspectives: Making Sense of Space

                        8 – Comparative Urbanism: The City and Culture

                        Midterm exam

5                      9 – The New Urban Sociology: The City and Capitalism

                        10 – Stratification and Social Class: Urban and Suburban Lifestyles

                        Quiz #4

6                      11 – Race, Ethnicity, and Gender: Urban Diversity

                        12 – Housing, Education, Crime: Confronting Urban Problems

                        Quiz #5

7                      12 – Housing , Education, Crime: Confronting Urban Problems

                        13 – Cities in the Developing World

                        Quiz #6

8                      14 – Planning the Urban Environment

                        Final Exam
 

Course Weekly Assignment Dates:

Week              Topic                                                                                                  Due

1                      Article Review - Davis, F. 1959.                                                       3/21

                        “The Cab Driver and His Fair: Facets of a Fleeting

                        Relationship,” American Journal of Sociology 65:

                        September. The review should be at least 1,000 words

2                      Writing Assignment - Compare a Snowbelt and a Sunbelt city           3/28

                        with respect to population composition, economic activities,

                        lifestyles, political structure, infrastructure, etc.   Examine

                        some of the problems the Snowbelt city deals with that the

                        Sunbelt city doesn’t have to. Be mindful of the impact on

                        the residents of the community and discuss real and perceived

                        sociological advantages to living in each city. This written

                        assignment should be at least 1,000 words.

 3                     Project Review – Select one of the current research                         4/04

                        projects of interest identified at this web-site, and

                        describe its relationship to chapter 5, urban sociology,

                        and specifically, explain how this current research is

                        expected to improve the lives of those living in urban

                        areas. This report should be at least 1,000 words.

4                      Essay Response - Compare and contrast the views of                    4/11

                        Oswald Spengler and Lewis Mumford in terms of the

                        question, “Is the city truly synonymous with civilization?”

                        Responses must be at least 1,000 words.

5                      Commentary Review – Read Robert Solow’s article entitled            4/18

                        “Forty Years of Social Policy and Policy Research”

                       Research Review – Read the research report of                               4/25

                        Ms. Melissa Favreault entitled “Discrimination and Economic

                        Mobility” and, first, identify what you believe to be the most

                        significant aspect of the report and explain why, then, describe

                        how this report supports or refutes the data presented in

                        chapter 11. The response to this assignment must be at least

                        1,000 words. 

 7                     Critical Review – Write a critical review of Susan S. Fainstein’s             5/02

                        Article entitled “Tourism and the Commodification of Urban

                        Examine the pros and cons of Ms. Fainstein’s article, explore the

                        ways the article relates to chapter 13. This assignment must be

                        at least 1,000 words.

 8                      Project Assignment – Consider the tragedy of Hurricane Katrina            5/09

                        and the devastation the New Orleans metro area sustained. If you

                        were responsible for rebuilding a major metro area, what would

                        major items would you consider in your planning of the urban

                        environment and why? This assignment must be at least 1,000

                        words  

 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
3, 5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
•  Critically, creatively and thoroughly evaluates at least 7 well-selected course materials, and develops more than 1 application or conclusion for each, as used in the assignment.  Identifies and successfully defends at least 2 strengths and weaknesses for each.  All critical evaluation is justified and supported through well-crafted reason and evidence.  Goes beyond assignment expectations in the quantity and quality of critical evaluation.
•  Justifies all arguments through the integrated application of comprehensive and detailed critical reasoning and scientific evidence.  Displays significant creativity and initiative.
•  Reflexively and creatively evaluates at least 3 strengths and 3 weakness of their own and at least 3 others' assumptions, arguments, analyses, conclusions, and applications.
 
•  Critically evaluates appropriate selected course materials, and at least 5 outside academic sources appropriate to the assignment and an upper division course.  Identifies both the strengths and weaknesses of each major concept or position, and justifies their evaluation through reason and evidence.
•  Justifies most arguments (all but 1 or 2) through the integrated application of appropriate and sufficiently detailed critical reasoning and scientific evidence.
•  Reflexively identifies at least 2 strengths and 2 weaknesses of their own and at least 2 others' assumptions, arguments, analyses, conclusions, and applications.
 
•  Demonstrates little critical evaluation (no more than 3 or 4 attempts), or such evaluation presented is inappropriate to the assignment or topic.  Fails to offer a balanced evaluation of some concepts or positions.  Fails to consistently explain and justify their reasons or evidence for all points.
•  Justifies no more than 3 or 4 of their arguments in an appropriate manner.  Fails to integrate appropriate and sufficiently detailed critical reasoning or scientific evidence for each major point.
•  Fails to demonstrate critical reflexivity, or presents biased arguments against those positions with which they disagree or for those arguments or evidence that supports their pre-existing biases.
•  May even demonstrate critical thinking skills, but they are used in the “weak sense” and work only to support their foregone (biased) conclusions.
 
•  Demonstrates no critical evaluation — or makes 3 or more major, or many minor, critical errors.  Modes of evaluation are inappropriate to the assignment and level of an upper division course.  Arguments are unbalanced and demonstrably biased.
•  Fails to offer any appropriate justification for arguments.  Uses little critical reasoning or scientific evidence, none at all, or such reasons and evidence is wholly inappropriate.
•  Is not appreciably critical or reflexive, and may evidence merely seeking to confirm their pre-existing opinions without subjecting them to critical testing.
 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1, 2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
•  Displays particular judgment in selecting and integrating more than 5 outside academic sources (in excess of assignment requirements).
•  Integrates, compares and contrasts differing sources and perspectives without error and in creative and especially effective ways.
•  Incorporates sources from popular or mainstream media or personal experience (in addition to those above) as particularly apt illustrations of course content and other outside academic resources.
•  Draws several accurate, justified, and creative connections among multiple concepts and sources consistently at or above the level of an upper division course.
 
•  Correctly integrates a at least 5 outside academic sources appropriate to the assignment and to an upper division course.
•  Integrates, compares and contrasts differing sources and perspectives with no major errors and more than a few minor errors.
•  May also incorporate sources from popular or mainstream media (in addition to those above), but correctly distinguishes between scientific and non-scientific outside sources, as appropriate, and uses the latter only for illustration and not justification.
•  Draws at least 5 accurate and justified connections among multiple concepts and sources.
 
•  Attempts to integrate at least 4 outside academic sources, but does so with 1 major error or with several minor errors.  Or incorporates outside sources with little or no attempt at their integration or synthesis.  Or with attempts at synthesis not consistently meeting the level of an upper division course.
•  Insufficient integration, comparison or contrast of differing sources and perspectives with 1 major, or several minor, errors.  Or includes only sources on one side of an issue where there is legitimate and obvious disciplinary disagreement.
•  Evidences little, if any, discernment between academic and popular sources.
•  Draws fewer that 5 connections among concepts and sources.  May contain 1 serious error or several minor errors.
 
•  Little, if any, attempt to integrate outside academic sources (no more than 4 sources).  Contains more than 1 major error or many minor errors.  No significant attempt at synthesis appropriate to an upper division course.
•  No significant comparison or contrast among sources and perspectives.  May demonstrate 2 or more major errors or many minor ones.
•  Evidences no discernment between academic and popular sources.
•  Draws fewer than 5 connections among concepts and sources, and those attempts contain 2 or more major errors, or many minor ones.
 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 4, 7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
•  Demonstrates exceptional command of a full range of concepts and theoretical perspectives presented in the course, with more than 5 well-developed examples.  Introduces at least 2 additional relevant findings or theoretical and conceptual distinctions.
•  Exceptional analysis of a wide range of appropriate course materials (more than 5) and outside sources (more than 2) beyond the assignment guidelines and without error.
• Presents creative and sophisticated reason, logical justification, and exceptionally high evidentiary standards consistently at or beyond the level of an upper division course.
 
•  Demonstrates sufficient command of appropriate concepts and theoretical perspectives presented in the course, and successfully uses at least 5 course concepts.
•  Successfully analyzes at least 5 appropriately selected course materials, and least 2 outside sources, without major error.
•  Identifies and exemplifies forms of reason, justification and evidentiary standards appropriate to the level of an upper division course.
 
•  Demonstrates insufficient command of appropriate concepts and theoretical perspectives at the level of an upper division course, insufficiently or unsuccessfully use the chosen analytic tools, or chooses inappropriate analytic tools.
•  Analysis of appropriate selected course materials contains 1 major error or several minor ones.  May not attempt significant (or any) analysis of outside materials or examples.
•  Uses some inappropriate reason, evidence or justification.
 
•  Fails to demonstrate any sufficient command of appropriate concepts and theoretical perspectives.  Fails to sufficiently or successfully use their chosen analytic tools.  Chooses some inappropriate analytic tools.
•  Analysis of inappropriate course materials or contains at least 2 major errors or many minor ones.  No attempt at analysis of outside materials or examples.
•  Uses inappropriate, insufficient, or unjustified reason or evidence.
 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
2, 7, 8                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
•  Demonstrates and justifies exceptional command of factual course materials (more than 4 instances).  Creatively and effectively employs more than 2 salient outside examples.
•  Creatively and consistently applies course materials to 3 or more relevant personal, social, and historical examples without error.
•  Creatively, effectively, and illustrates and supports all points through well-chosen and integrated relevant examples, details, and supporting information consistently at or above the level of an upper division course.
 
•  Demonstrates and justifies sufficient command of factual materials presented in the course (at least 4 instances), and at least 2 outside sources.
•  Applied course materials to at least 3 appropriate personal, social, or historical examples without major error.
•  Provides adequate illustration and support of all points through salient and relevant examples, details, and supporting information at the level of an upper division course.
 
•  Demonstrates insufficient command of factual course materials (fewer than 4 instances).  Fails to meaningfully incorporate outside examples.  Does not consistently or adequately justify their inclusion.
•  Inappropriate or insufficient (fewer than 3) personal, social, or historical examples.  Any applications, such as there are, may contain 1 major error or several minor errors.
•  Provides inadequate illustration and support of a few key points (no more than 4) or several minor ones.  Examples, details, and supporting information is often tangential or its connection is incompletely explained and justified.
 
•  Fails to demonstrate meaningful command of factual course materials.  Rarely justifies their inclusion or makes serious and consistent omissions (more than 2).
•  Lacks meaningful, relevant, or significant personal, social, or historical examples, or those provided are completely inappropriate to the assignment.  May contain more than 2 major errors or many minor errors in application.
•  Provides little, if any, support for even key points.  Examples, details, and supporting information is lacking, irrelevant, or unexplained.
 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
•  Goes beyond the strictures of the assignment through the use of exceptionally precise, accurate and expressive language chosen for a well-defined audience.  May even successfully integrate the needs of multiple audiences.
•  Is exceptionally well organized, unified, focused, flowing, or has a particularly well-suited opening and closing.  Nuanced and precise control of language.
•  Presents a balanced and thoughtful treatment of controversial research or policy issues, even as it clearly communicates an advocated position.
•  Utilizes technical terminology from the course and outside reseaarch in an advanced, nuanced, and precise manner consistently at or exceeding the level of an upper division course.
 
•  Responds fully and completely to the assignment using appropriate, direct language and expresses its purpose clearly and persuasively for the needs of a defined audience.
•  Well-organized, unified, focused, flowing, and opens and closes effectively.
•  Presents one side of controversial research or policy issues well and completely, and makes a serious (though perhaps not completely successful) effort to communicate alternatives.
•  Correctly utilizes technical language from the course and outside research in a manner appropriate to the assignment and level of the course.
 
•  Fails to respond fully or completely to the assignment.  Language is sometimes inappropriate, flaccid, or confusing and does not express its purpose clearly and persuasively.  Audience is undefined or inconsistent.
•  Lacks some organization or unified argument.  May be slightly unfocused.  Has significant problem with flow or effective opening and closing passages.
•  Evidences bias or makes little effort to communicate serious alternatives.
•  Has 1 or more major, or, more than a few minor, terminological errors.
 
•  Falls significantly short of the assignment strictures.  Language is often inappropriate, flaccid, and confusing, and does not express a clear or persuasive purpose.  No clear sense of audience.
•  Is disorganized, disjointed, unfocused, or stilted.  Unsuccessful or lacking in its opening and closing.
•  Evidences significant bias.  Makes no effort to communicate serious alternatives or digresses into mere opinion or ideology.
• Has 2 or more major, or many minor, terminological errors.
 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
•  Has no errors in spelling, grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, structure and format.
• Evidences literacy, numeracy, rhetorical, and information processing skills at or beyond the level of an upper division course.
•  Completely and correctly acknowledges and documents (through in text citations and an accompanying references section) all directly and indirectly used sources.
•  No errors in the application of relevant portions of APA format.
 
•  Has no more than 1 major error, and no more than a few minor errors, in spelling, grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, structure and format.
•  Evidences basic literacy, numeracy, rhetorical, and information processing skills appropriate to the level of an upper division course.
•  Consistently, but not completely acknowledges and documents (through in text citations and an accompanying references section) all directly used sources.  May evidence no more than 3 minor problems with indirect attribution or a few small errors in reference format.
•  1 or a few minor errors in the application of relevant portions of APA format.
 
• Has 2 or more major, or more than a few minor, errors in spelling, grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, structure and format.
•  Incompletely or inconsistently displays literacy, numeracy, rhetorical, and information processing skills at the level of an upper division course.  May include up to 2 major errors or a few minor ones.
•  Incompletely or inconsistently acknowledges and documents (through in text citations and an accompanying references section) all directly used sources.  May evidence 1 major problem, or a few minor problems, with indirect attribution or several errors in reference format.
•  1 major error, or a few minor errors, in the application of relevant portions of APA format.
 
• Has 3 or more major, or many minor, errors in spelling, grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, structure and format.
• Has 2 or more major errors, or many minor errors, in literacy, numeracy, rhetorical, or information processing skills, or fails to demonstrate most of these at the level of an upper division course.
• Has 2 or more major errors, or many minor errors, in acknowledging and documenting citations and references.  May evidence 2 or more major problems with indirect attribution or may misattribute sources.  Reference and citation format is inconsistent or incorrect.
•  More than 2 major error, or several minor errors, in the application of relevant portions of APA format.
 
INTERDISCIPLINARY                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
Outcomes
1, 2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Well and completely integrates ecological, demographic, institutional, social, cultural, and other factors in their explanation with no significant or noticeable errors. Integrates ecological, demographic, institutional, social, cultural, and other factors in their explanation with no major errors and only a few minor ones. Does not demonstrate a successful or consistent ability to integrate ecological, demographic, institutional, social, cultural, and other factors in their explanation. Contains 1 or 2 major errors or several minor ones. Fails to demonstrate an appreciable ability to integrate ecological, demographic, institutional, social, cultural, and other factors in their explanation. Contains more than 2 major errors and omissions, or many minor errors and omissions. 
CONTEMPORARY                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Outcomes
2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Thoroughtly and creatively analyzes and evaluates the effects of human diversity within and between cities with no significant or noticeable errors. Analyzes and evaluates the effects of human diversity within and between cities with no major errors and only a few minor ones. Does not demonstrate a successful or consistent ability to analyze or evaluate the effects of human diversity within and between cities. Contains 1 or 2 major errors or several minor ones. Fails to demonstrate an appreciable ability to analyze or evaluate the effects of human diversity within and between cities. Contains more than 2 major errors and omissions, or many minor errors and omissions. 

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Last Updated:5/18/2009 11:21:40 AM