Syllabus Entrance
Printer Friendly
Email Syllabus

ED 514 Foundations of Educational Administration
Henry, Brian L.


COURSE SYMBOL AND NUMBER: ED514

COURSE TITLE: Foundations of Educational Administration

COURSE DESCRIPTOR: NA

TERM COURSE BEING TAUGHT: Fall 1, 2004 (F1P04)

NAME OF FACULTY MEMBER: Dr. Brian Henry

TITLE OF FACULTY MEMBER: Adjunct Faculty

FACULTY OFFICE LOCATION: Copley 316

FACULTY OFFICE HOURS:

FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONE NUMBER: (816) 587-7373

FACULTY PARK EMAIL ADDRESS:

OTHER FACULTY EMAIL ADDRESS: henryb@parkhill.k12.mo.us

FACULTY WEB PAGE ADDRESS:

DATES OF THE TERM:  August 23, 2004 through October 17, 2004

CLASS SESSIONS DAYS: Mondays

CLASS SESSION TIME: 5:00 – 9:30

PREREQUISITE(S): None

CREDIT HOURS: 3

 

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

 

VISION STATEMENT

Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Designed to give the prospective administrator a historical perspective of the evolution of educational systems and governance and the role of the principal in guiding schools through the political, social, cultural, and economic processes which impact American education.

 

FACULTY’S EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY: The instructor’s role is to provide students with the opportunity to take an active role in reading, researching, presenting, discussing and applying information related to the course objectives and learner outcomes.  The instructor recognizes the importance of student contributions to the learning environment and encourages the cooperative exploration of ideas, issues, and contradictions.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES: On the conclusion of this course the student will be able to:

      [Number in brackets refers to Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium Standard]

 

v     Demonstrate an understanding of the historical perspective of education in the United States and its role in developing and preserving a democratic society. [1.3.6]

v     Demonstrate knowledge of the historical laws, statues, and policies and their effects on education. [1.3.6]

v     Demonstrate an understanding of the various political, social, cultural, and economic systems as they affect public education. [1.3.6]

v     Demonstrate knowledge of local, state, national, and global issues in the educational systems and their application to the process of teaching and learning. [1.3.2; 1.3.6]

v     Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of education for all people in a democratic society and the significance of diversity, equity, and access to a free public education. [1.3.1; 1.3.5; 1.3.6]

v     Analyze models of organizational structure, including the classical, bureaucratic, and participatory management, and explain how the social systems model can be applied to educational organizations. [1.3.1; 1.3.3]

v     Analyze different leadership styles; evaluate their own leadership skills, abilities and attributes; and articulate a personal leadership style. [1.3.1]

v     Demonstrate an effective decision making process. [1.3.1; 1.3.2; 1.3.6]

v     Demonstrate effective communication practices. [1.3.1; 1.3.4]

 

COURSE TEXTBOOK(S): Green, R. L. (2005). Practicing the art of leadership: A problem-based approach to implementing the ISLLC standards (2nd ed). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall Inc.

ISBN 0-13-113253-9

 

Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium of the Chief State School Officers Standards for School Leaders.  (1996).  Council of Chief State School Officers.

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY: “Academic Honesty is required of all members of a learning community.  Hence, Park will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers or other course assignments.  Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from Park.”

 

PLAGIARISM: “Plagiarism—the appropriation or imitation of the language or ideas of another person and presenting them as one’s original work—sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance.  Students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their instructors.”

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Instructors are required to keep attendance records and report absences.  The instructor may excuse absences for cogent reasons, but missed work must be made up within the term of enrollment.  Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.  In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of “F”.  An Incomplete will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.  Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance (TA) or Veterans Administration (VA) educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.  Reports of F grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for students receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

 

LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS: The instructor will not accept assignments late.  Assignments not submitted on the due date will receive a grade of “zero”. Extenuating circumstances must be discussed with the instructor on an individual basis.

 

COURSE ASSESSMENT:

 

Participation - Student attendance and participation is essential in achieving maximum learning.  It is generally expected that students will attend all scheduled class sessions and to contribute to the classroom learning environment.  However, it is recognized that occasions do arise that necessitate being absent from a class.  Students are responsible for making prior arrangements regarding a necessary absence and for completing any alternative assignments.  (80 points)

 

Personal Philosophy of Leadership - The student will develop a philosophy statement related to his/her beliefs related to educational leadership as related to the ISLLC standards.  The philosophy statement will be based on course readings, discussions and activities as well as on the student’s personal experiences.  (20 points)

 

Weekly Reflections - Each student should submit a weekly reflection journal starting with week two.  The reflection journal is to be submitted each class period and should include the student’s reaction to course activities (subject matter, class discussions, comments, presentations, etc.) that occurred the preceding week.  Each journal should be approximately one typed double spaced page in length. THESE ARE PERSONAL REFLECTION JOURNALS.  IN OTHER WORDS, THEY ARE WHAT YOU THINK AND BELIEVE RELATED TO WHAT YOU ARE LEARNING!  Reflections should not be simply a summary of classroom activities.  (60 points)  Whereas your comments are your personal belief and reactions, reflective comments will be assessed based on how they relate to the previous weeks activities, not on the position or positions taken.

 

Individual Report/Presentations  - The student will write a 5-7 page paper related to an educational leadership issue of his/her choice.  The student will also present the paper orally to the class (15 - 20 minutes).  The paper, including a References page with a minimum of 5 sources, will be due at the end of the class period following the oral presentation. The paper, in addition to reference information, should include a discussion of the issue and the student’s personal reactions.  An outline of the presentation should be provided to other course participants. (140 points)

 

·        Outline of Topic (Organization, Development, Structure) – 10 points

·        Discussion of the Issue (Identification of the issue; the reason for its importance; pros, cons, opposing viewpoints; etc.) – 30 points

·        Delivery Quality (Clarity of ideas; presentation techniques, i.e. eye contact, interactivity with the audience; posture; voice projection/clarity; reliance on written sources; etc.) – 30 points

·        Personal Reaction - 30 points

·        References (Should be from recognized journals or publications) – 15 points

·        Writing Mechanics/Adherence to APA Guidelines – 25 points

 

Mid-Term Exam- The mid-term examination will be written responses to the reflection questions relating to the administrative scenarios contained in chapters 2-4 of the text. A sampling of four scenarios will be taken from these chapters. Your responses to each scenario will be worth 25 points for a total of 100 points.

 

Final Exam- The final exam will be written responses to the reflection questions relating to the administrative scenarios contained in chapters 5-7 of the text. A sampling of four scenarios will be taken from these chapters. Your responses to each scenario will be worth 25 points for a total of 100 points.

 

CLASSROOM RULES OF CONDUCT: Come to class prepared and ready to participate.

 

DISABILITY GUIDELINES: Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance.  These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal.  It is Park University’s policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.  Additional information concerning Park University’s policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: www.park.edu/disability

 

COURSE TOPICS/DATES/ASSIGNMENTS:

Week

Date

Topics/Assignments

1

August 23

 

2

August 30

Commence Reflective Journals (Reflective journals will continue through session seven)

ISLLC Standard 1

Leadership in Today’s Schools – (Chapter 2)
Leadership Traits; Leadership Behaviors; Leadership Theories; Power and Authority

Activity

3

September 6

Reflective Journals Continue

ISLLC- Standard 2

Organizational Influences (Chapter 3)
Understanding Self; Organizational Influences; Contemporary Practice

Oral Reports

 

4

September 13

Reflective Journals Continue

ISLLC- Standard 3

Communications in Today’s Schools (Chapter 4)

Importance of Communications; Communications Processes, Flow, and Barriers

  A brief history of the school principal

 Oral Reports Continue

Mid-Term Exam

5

September 20

Reflective Journals Continue

ISLLLC- Standard 4

Decision Making (Chapter 5)
Importance of Decision Making; Approaches to Decision Making; Barrier and Traps to Decision Effectiveness

Oral Reports Continue

 

6

September 27

Reflective Journals Continue

ISLLC- Standard 5

Managing Conflict (Chapter 6)
Factors Influencing Conflict; The Nature of Conflict; Managing Conflict

Oral Reports Continue

 

7

October 4

Reflective Journals Continue

ISLLC- Standard 6

Facilitating Change (Chapter 7)
Leadership and Change: The Process of Change ; Addressing the Needs of Students

Leadership Philosophy Due

Oral Reports Continue

 

8

October 11

Final Exam

Oral Reports Continue

Course Evaluation

 


 

GRADING PLAN:

 

Participation- 80 points

Reflection Journal- 60 points

Personal Philosophy of Leadership- 20 points

Paper and Presentation- 140 points

Mid-term Exam- 100 points

Final Exam- 100 points

Total= 500 points

 

Total Points

500-450= A

449-400= B

399-350= C

349-300= D

299-000= F