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EN 201 Introduction to Literature
Paumier, Resha K.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

EN 201 Introduction to Literature

Semester

S1T 2010 DL

Faculty

Paumier, Resha K.

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

MA English Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
BS English Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Office Location

Carroll, OH Eastern Standard Time

Office Hours

Monday and Thursday  Noon - 1:00 PM EST

Daytime Phone

740-204-8052 Use this number only during office hours or if you cannot reach me by email

E-Mail

Resha.Paumier@park.edu  Please contact me here whenever possible. I check and respond to email daily.

Semester Dates

1/11/10 - 3/7/10

Class Days

Online

Class Time

Online

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Title: The Compact Bedford Introduction to Literature Eighth Edition, ©2008 Michael Meyer

ISBN-13:978-0-312-46959-7
ISBN-10: 0-312-46959-4

 

 

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
EN201 Introduction to Literature (GE): Develops skills in reading, interpreting, and evaluating literature, and surveys some of the major concerns and movements in literacy criticism. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
My educational philosophy is that all of my students have valuable knowledge to teach one another and myself. I am only a facilitator in the classroom, not the "keeper and dispenser of all knowledge."

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Examine a range of literary texts and discuss responses to them
  2. Categorize texts by established genres and critique genre identifications
  3. Articulate a full response to a single literary text or define and respond to a collection of texts


Core Assessment:

The core assessment for En 201 is a critical paper consisting of 5-8 pages of original literary analysis using personal insights and primary and secondary sources. MLA documentation, including a Work Cited page, is also required. A minimum of 3 sources are required, and must include a range of types of sources, including online and traditional print sources. The core assessment must account for no less than 25 % of the final grade. 

The rubric for this assignment is included below.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Grading:

Assessment
Week
Points
Total
Discussion Thread Postings
 Weekly
10
80
Peer Review Posts
Weekly
5
40
Weekly Quizzes
Weekly
15
120
Weekly Response Papers
Weekly
10
80
Paper 1 (Fiction) 3 pages
Due Week 3
100
100
Paper 2 (Poetry) 4 pages
Due Week 6
130
130
Paper 3 (Drama)  5 pages
Due Week 8
150
150
Final Exam
Take end of course
100
100
 
Total points for class
800

.

Grading:

 
Points Grade
800 -720 A
719-640 B
639-560 C
559-480 D
479 and below F

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Essay assignments submitted after the due date will not be considered for full credit. One full grade will be deducted for each day an assignment is late. For example, a late assignment that was due Sunday by noon, even if otherwise perfect, can only earn a “B” if submitted by Monday noon, a “C” by Tuesday noon, a “D” by Wednesday noon, and will not be accepted (earn a 0) after that time. The points deducted for a late paper will be in addition to those deducted in the regular assignment grading rubric.  

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Students are responsible for clicking on the link below and thoroughly reading each Online course policy. If you have questions about any of these policies, please contact your instructor for clarification.

Online Course Policies
http://captain.park.edu/portal/online_course_policies.htm

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Week 1—Fiction (Plot, Character, Setting)

 

Activities:

 

Reading Assignment:

  • Read Introduction to Chapter 3 on  “Plot” and then read “A Rose for Emily”.  Read Chapter 2 on “Writing About Fiction.”
  • Read Introduction to Chapter 4 on “Character” and read “Bartleby, the Scrivener.”
  • Read Introduction to Chapter 5 on “Setting” and “Soldier’s Home.”
Discussion Posting -- ü Post a response in the Discussion Thread for Week 1 to two of the three questions below (3 postings):
 
1. Why does Faulkner choose to create the narrator as “we” rather than “I” in a “Rose for Emily?” Why is this important to the plot?

2. How does your response to Bartleby develop over the course of the story? Is he a dynamic or a static character?

3. Explain how Kreb’s war experiences are present throughout the story even though we get little detail about them.

ü Post a Peer Response to at least two of your classmates' responses on the Discussion Thread.

Response Paper -- ü Write a one-page (double-spaced) response paper for each of the three Exercises listed in Lesson One under "Plot", "Character," and "Setting" (one for each of the fictional elements). These Exercises are in the PowerPoint Lecture for Lesson I. Turn these 3 Response papers in to the dropbox by the end of Week One.

Quiz -- ü Take the weekly quiz.

Paper One (Due week 3)-- ü  Begin to identify a short story that you would like to compare and contrast with an event from your own life and begin to craft a thesis statement, or controlling idea for the paper. The story needs to be one that we have read as a class.
 
If you have questions about writing literary essays (or it has been awhile since you have have written about literature) please go to the following website from the Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University to brush up on how to Write about Fiction:

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/616/01/

Week 2—Fiction (Point-of-View, Symbolism, Theme)
 
Activities:

Reading Assignment:

  • Read Introduction to Chapter 6 on Point of View. Also, read "The Cask of Amontillado" (pages 552-557).
  • Read Introduction to Chapter 7 on “Symbolism”.  Also, read “Clothes” (p. 532-541) and “Her First Elk” (p. 516-525) .
  • Read Introduction to Chapter 8 on “Theme” and “Young Goodman Brown” (319-333).

Discussion Posting --

ü Post a response in the Discussion Thread for Week 2 to two of the three questions below:

1.      How does the Point of View (POV) affect your understanding of "The Cask of Amontillado"?

2.      Explain how the 7-Eleven is used as a symbol of American life in "Clothes".

3.      Examine Young Goodman Brown's response to his experiences.

ü Post a Peer Response to at least two of your classmates' responses on the Discussion Thread.

Response Paper -- ü  Write a one-page (double-spaced) Response Paper for each of the three Exercises listed in Lesson 2 under "POV", "Symbol," and "Theme" (one for each of the fictional elements). These Exercises are in the PowerPoint Lecture for Lesson 2. Turn these 3 Response Papers in to the dropbox by the end of Week 2.

Quiz -- ü Take the weekly quiz.

Paper One (due week 3)-- ü Turn in thesis and very rough draft for the comparison and contrast paper by the end of Week 2.

Week 3—Fiction (A Critical Case Study: William Faulkner’s “Barn Burning”)
 
Activities:

Reading Assignment:

  • Read entire Critical Case Study: William Faulkner's "Barn Burning" Chapter 13

Discussion Posting --

ü Post a response in the Discussion Thread for Week 3 to two of the three questions below:

1.      How is “Barn Burning” a story about social class, drawing from DeMott’s argument?

2.      How is “Barn Burning” a story about human development and psychology, drawing from Wilson’s essay?

3.      Why might, according to Hiles, “Barn Burning” be a “regional” story?

ü Post a Peer Response to at least two of your classmates' responses on the Discussion Thread.

Response Paper -- ü Write a one-page (double-spaced) response paper for “Barn Burning” drawing from one of the questions listed in “The Questions for Writing” at the end of chapter 13. Turn this Response Paper into the dropbox by the end of Week 3.

Quiz -- ü Take the weekly quiz.

Paper One Fiction-- ü Turn in Essay 1.

 Week 4—Poetry (Reading Poetry; “Word Choice, Word Order, and Tone”)
 
Activities:

Reading Assignment:

  • Read all of Chapter 18 on "Reading Poetry"
  • Read all of Chapter 20 on "Word Choice, Word Order and Tone"

Discussion Posting --

ü Post a response in the Discussion Thread for Week 4 to the two of the three questions below:

1.      In “Introduction to Poetry”, what kinds of advice does the speaker in the poem give the reader? What is your favorite poem in the first chapter, and how does the speaker’s advice impact your reading of that poem?

2.      “Tone” is the writer’s attitude toward the subject. Examine Ted Kooser’s “A Death at the Office.” What is the tone of the poem? What lines in the poem support your views on the tone?

3.      In “To His Coy Mistress”, is there more to the theme than a "simple but vigorous celebration of flesh?"

ü Post a Peer Response to at least two of your classmates' responses on the Discussion Thread.

Response Paper Write a one-page (double-spaced Response Paper for each of the two Exercises listed in Lesson 4 under “Word Order”, “Symbol,” and “Tone” (one for each of the two fictional elements). These Exercises are located in the PowerPoint Lecture for Lesson 4. Turn these 2 Response Papers in to the dropbox by the end of Week 4.

Quiz -- ü Take the weekly quiz.

 

Paper Two --(Due at the end of Week 6) ü Begin to identify two poems that you would like to compare and contrast, and begin to craft a thesis statement, or controlling idea for the paper. Both poems must be found in the class text, and at least one of the poems needs to be one that we have read as a class (though you may well use both poems from the course reading list). For example, you could compare and contrast "Dover Beach" and "Ode to a Grecian Urn," but not "Ode to a Grecian Urn" and "When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be" because we have not read either poem as a class. If you have questions about writing essays about poetry, please go to the following website from the Online Writing Lab (OWL) at PurdueUniversity to brush up on how to Write about Poetry:

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/615/01/

Week 5—Poetry (Images and Figures of Speech)   

Activities:

Reading Assignment:

  • Read all of Chapter 21 on "Images"
  • Read all of Chapter 22 on "Figures of Speech"
  • Read all on Chapter 23 on "Symbol, Allegory and Irony"

Discussion Posting --

ü Post a response in the Discussion Thread for Week 5 to two of the three questions below:

1.      Wilfred Owen emerges as one of the great W.W.I. poets. What images in “Dulce et Decorum Est” are the most vivid? To what senses do they speak?

2.      In Linda Pastan’s “Marks”, discuss how the last line serves as the poem’s controlling metaphor.

3.      In William Stafford’s “Traveling through the Dark”, what are the symbols in the poem? What do they represent?

ü Post a Peer Response to at least two of your classmates' responses on the Discussion Thread.

Response Paper -- ü Write a one-page (double-spaced) Response Paper for each of the three Exercises listed in Lesson 5 under “image”, “Metaphor,” and “Irony” (one for each of these three element of poetry). These Exercises are located in the PowerPoint Lecture for Lesson 5. Turn these 3 Reponses in by the end of Week 5.  

Quiz -- ü Take the weekly quiz.

Paper Two -- ü Turn in thesis and rough draft for the Poetry paper.

 Week 6—Poetry (A Study of Robert Frost)  

Activities:

Reading Assignment:

  • Read all of Chapter 30

Discussion Posting --

ü Post a response in the Discussion Thread for Week 6 to two of the three questions below:

1.      Discuss the symbolism in “A Road not Taken.”

2.      What is your favorite Frost poem, and why?

3.      Why might, according to Herbert R. Coursen, the speaker in the poem resemble “Santa Claus”?

ü Post a Peer Response to at least two of your classmates' responses on the Discussion Thread.

Response Paper -- ü Write a one-page (double-spaced) response paper for “Birches” drawing from one of the questions immediately following the poem in the text.

Quiz -- ü Take the weekly quiz.

Paper Two -- Poetry ü Paper 2 is due in the instructor's dropbox by Sunday at midnight.

Week 7—Drama (“Reading Drama”; “Writing About Drama”; Death of a Salesman

 

Activities:

Reading Assignment:

  • Read Introduction of Chapter 38 "Reading Drama"
  • Read Introduction of Chapter 39 "Writing About Drama"
  • Read Introduction of Chapter 40 "Theatrical Conventions of Greek Drama"
  • Read the play"Death of a Salesman"

Discussion Posting --

ü Post a response in the Discussion Thread for Week 7 to two of the three questions below:

1.      Is this a tragic play according to the definition of tragedy found in the glossary of Literary terms found at the back of the text?

2.      How is Willy Loman an “everyman”?

3.      Death of a Salesman’s Willy Loman believes that it is more important to be well-liked than almost anything else. Do you agree or disagree with this belief? What do you think Arthur Miller’s perspective might be?

 

ü Post a Peer Response to at least two of your classmates' responses on the Discussion Thread.

Response Paper -- ü Write a one-page (double-spaced) response paper for Death of a Salesman answering the following question, “Who is most responsible for Willy’s death?”

Quiz -- ü Take the weekly quiz.

Paper Three -- ü
Craft thesis statement and rough draft comparing and contrasting the main ideas in either Death of a Salesman with a short story that we have read this semester, or two poems that have similar themes. You MUST have at least three outside scholarly sources, and a "Works Cited" page (MLA Documentation style).

This draft is due in the dropbox by the end of Week 7.

This paper (5 pages, MLA citations) will compare a similar theme between genres. Like your other two papers, you will establish a thesis and craft your paper around this controlling idea. You will draw from each text for specific examples, as well as at least three scholarly sources (in addition to the texts.)

The rubric for this paper is posted in your course syllabus under "core assessment."

 
Week 8—Drama

Activities:

Reading Assignment:

  • Read Fences 

Discussion Posting --

ü Post a response in the Discussion Thread for week 8 to two of the three questions below:

1.      How is the play’s title symbolic of the "fences" at baseball parks and the "fences" that people create between one another?

2.      What is the relationship between fathers and son in Death of a Salesman and Fences?

3.      How are Willy Loman and Troy Maxson similar/different?

ü Post a Peer Response to at least two of your classmates' responses on the Discussion Thread.

 

Response Paper -- Write a one-page (double-spaced) response paper for Fences answering the following question, “Is the ending of the play happy?”

Quiz -- Take the weekly quiz.

Paper Three -- Drama: Paper 3 is due.

Proctored Final

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog Page 92

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
1, 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Provides well-chosen personal and critical insights to the literatures that supports thesis. Makes adequate personal and critical statements, though sometimes strays from thesis. Provides only plot summary, biographical information. Little or no evidence of close reading of literature. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Incorporates primary and secondary sources using MLA documentation style in ways that provide new insights into the literature. Incorporates some primary and secondary sources using MLA documentation style adequately, though without particularly fresh insights. Primary and secondary sources used rarely if at all and without adequate MLA documentation. Adds no coherent personal insights. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 2, 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Provides convincing and innovative connections between texts through careful close reading of literature. Provides reasonable connections between texts that are obvious but nonetheless plausible. Connections between texts remain vague and undeveloped. Critique not supported by close readings. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
2, 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Skillfully interweaves passages from literature and critical texts as well as strong personal statements that illustrate main point of essay. Incorporates passages from literary and critical texts as well as some personal statements to prove thesis. Rarely provides specific passages from literary or critical texts, or fails to provide coherent explanation of passages. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Employs conventions of Standard Written English with grace and style in a well organized, fully developed essay. Employs conventions of Standard Written English adequately in a reasonably well organized and developed essay. Writing shows persistent problems with the use of Standard Written English. Statements are often illogical, incomprehensible; organization and development of ideas do not support thesis. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 
Close Reading                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Outcomes
1, 2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Provides new insight into specific passages from primary text(s). Adequately examines specific passages from primary text(s). Does not examine specific passages, or does so using vague generalities. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 
Provides links among a range of literary texts                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
1, 2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Analysis includes full discussion of a range of literary texts. Employs generic and literary terms with ease. An attempt is made to include discussion of a range of texts with clear grasp of generic and literary terms. Paper does not address a range of texts and does not employ appropriate literary terms. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 

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Last Updated:12/27/2009 8:55:30 PM