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PS 401 Abnormal Psychology
Aspell, Denise D.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

PS 401 Abnormal Psychology

Semester

U1SS 2009 RA

Faculty

Aspell, Denise D.

Title

Adjunct

Degrees/Certificates

M. A. Clinical Psychology

Office Location

None

Office Hours

Before and after class.

Daytime Phone

210-445-8425

E-Mail

Denise.Aspell@Park.edu

Semester Dates

1 June 2009 - 26 July 2009

Class Days

---W---

Class Time

4:55 - 10:20 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 

Comer, R. J. (2007). Abnormal psychology (6th ed.). New York: Worth.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:
 

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed. Text revision). Washington, DC.: American Psychiatric Association.

American Psychological Association. (2001). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.). Washington, DC.: American Psychological Association.

American Psychological Association. (2007). American Psychological Association style guide to electronic references (5th ed.). Washington, DC.: American Psychological Association.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
PS 401 Abnormal Psychology: An introduction and investigation of the causes, development, sympto-mology and treatment of abnormal behavior. Primary focus is an eclectic view of persons and their adaptation to their environment. 3:0:3 Prerequisite: PS 101.

Educational Philosophy:
 

Philosophy of Teaching and Learning:

My philosophy of teaching and learning is closely aligned with the mission statement of Park University. “The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community” (Park University Web Site, http://www.park.edu/about/Description/mission.asp ).

My philosophy of teaching and learning incorporates the words of Park’s mission statement as follows: “The mission of my facilitation of this class, an andragogical learning environment, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community” (Adapted from the mission statement of Park University).

Merriam-Webster Online indicates that an entrepreneurial environment is characterized by individuals who organize and assume the risks of managing a business, enterprise, or endeavor. A parallel concept may be that an andragogical learning environment is characterized by individuals who organize and assume the responsibilities of managing their learning and educational endeavors. In this paradigm is an inherent assumption that transformational adult learning, to varying degrees, is a realistic outcome. High functioning adult learners demonstrate: (a) critical thinking; (b) effective communication; and (c) an ability to reflect on and use life experience to facilitate their lifelong learning.

Method of Facilitation

 1.      Transformational and interactive learning methods characterize my main facilitation style.

2.      Lecturettes, Socratic method of question-and-answer, interaction between instructor and learner and between the learners themselves.

A Few References for My Educational Philosophy

Brookfield, S., & Preskill, S. (1999). Discussion as a way of teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Cranton, P. (1992). Working with adult learners. Dayton, OH: Wall & Emerson, Inc.

Cross, P., & Carusetta, E. (2004). Perspectives on authenticity in teaching. Adult Education Quarterly, 55, 5-22.

Dominice, P. (2000). Learning from our lives: Using educational biographies with adults. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

English, L. M. (2001). Reclaiming our roots: Spirituality as an integral part of adult learning. Adult learning, 12(3), 2-3.

Jarvis, P. (Ed.). (2001). Twentieth century thinkers in adult and continuing education (2nd ed.). London: Kogan Page Limited.

Knowles, M. S., Holton, E. F., III., & Swanson, R. A. (1998). The adult learner (5th ed.). Woburn, MA: Butterworth – Heinemann.

Knowles, M. S. & Associates (1984). Andragogy in action. San Francisco, CA: Jossey – Bass.

Lauzon, A. (2001). The challenges of spirituality in the everyday practice of the adult educator: Blurring the boundaries of the personal and professional. Adult learning, 12(3), 4-6.

Mezirow, J. (1991). Transformative dimensions of adult learning. San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons.

Mezirow, J., & Associates. (1990). Fostering critical reflection in adulthood: A guide to transformative and emancipatory learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
 
Mezirow, J., & Associates. (2000). Learning as transformation: Critical perspectives on a theory in progress. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate appropriate use of abnormal human behavior concepts, guided by the criteria of distress, deviance, dysfunction, danger.
  2. Differentiate and evaluate theories and treatments of psychopathology.
  3. Display ethical and responsible use of the DSM-IV.
  4. Identify the historical and cultural context of psychopathology.
  5. Critically examine the contextual influences on the theories and treatments of psychopathology.


Core Assessment:
All Park University courses are required to include a core assessment in order to measure the specific Departmental Learning Outcomes for each course. The core assessment for PS 401 Abnormal Psychology involves the application of knowledge of a particular disorder to a Case Study.  
 

DIRECTIONS:  After reading the case study, please answer the questions that are listed at the end of the case study.  Please list the category of the question e.g. EVALUATION, SYNTHESIS, etc., and number each question according to the numbers in the category listing. 

The Core Assessment Rubric for this assignment can be found here RUBRIC and at the bottom of this page. 

Please review the Rubric to assist you in meeting the expectations when answering the questions.

Randy 

Presenting Complaint

Thirty-two-year-old Randy lives in a cabin in a remote rural area of Montana. He moved here 10 years ago after he left his parents’ home in suburban Sacramento, California. The cabin has no electricity or running water. Randy considers himself a survivalist; he heats his house with wood and gets his water from a nearby mountain stream or from the rainwater he collects. He grows vegetables and kills game and birds. He has a 20-year-old truck that he uses to go into town, a 100-mile trip from his isolated home. He inherited $50,000 from an aunt several years ago. He keeps the money in a passbook savings account in town and withdraws cash when he needs it. He doesn't have a regular job, but people have found that he is good with his hands. He does odd carpentry jobs occasionally, if he is in the mood.

When Randy goes into town, it is usually to get a couple of hundred dollars of cash out of the bank, buy a few things from the grocery store, such as coffee, milk, and household items, treat himself to lunch at the diner, and go to the library. On these trips, he might pick up a job or two.

The people who know Randy refer to him as "odd" but harmless. He often talks to himself when he eats or works. Some say that if they listen closely he appears to be carrying on a conversation with one or two other people. Randy wears worn-out clothing and has long hair and a bushy beard. He is often dirty and disheveled, but he is not so different in that regard from other men in the area.

The diner where Randy eats lunch has a television that is always on. Randy appears agitated by the television and he mumbles something like, "Turn that thing off. It is messing with my head." One of the waitresses humors him and asks the other clients if she can turn it off. Most agree. When that waitress isn't working, the television stays on. Then Randy doesn’t linger over his meal.

The librarian says Randy must be very bright, because he checks out history and philosophy books. In fact, she often orders books he wants from a large city library, as their library caters to the simple tastes of its rural populace.

One day, Randy came into the restaurant extremely agitated. He was pulling at his hair and talking loudly. He asked the waitress to give him something to stop the noise. What noise, she asked? He said, "The noise in my head. Since the television stole my brain I can't stop the noise." The waitress laughed and said, "Why don't you tell us what kind of noise is in your head? Maybe we want to listen, too." At this point, Randy reached over the counter and grabbed the waitress by the blouse and shouted, "Kill the noise or I will kill you."

A scuffle ensued as the patrons in the restaurant rushed to the waitress's defense. As they struggled with Randy he got more upset. He kicked, he bit, he threatened. Someone called the police and they came to arrest Randy. He actually calmed down and told the officers, "So, it's you. Go ahead and take me. You have been after me for years—putting arsenic in my garden plot, taking money out of my bank account. And stealing my brain—don’t think I forgot that. But you will pay for this. The Chief is looking for you."

Randy was arrested and charged with assault and battery on the waitress and the patrons who tried to restrain him—both misdemeanors. Randy spent the night in jail before being brought before a judge the next day. During his night in jail he continuously banged on the bars demanding that the guards turn off the television (the closed-circuit television hung on the wall outside and across from his cell). He threw his metal dinner plate at the television, cursing it and yelling, "Why are you doing this to me? You stole my brain, what else do you want?" When he was taken in front of the judge, the officers reported on his comment at the restaurant and his behavior in jail. The jail superintendent reported that he wanted Randy charged with destruction of jail property (his metal dinner tray dented the side of the television). The judge ordered a psychological evaluation to see if Randy was suffering from a mental disorder of some kind. When the judge asked Randy if he knew what a psychological evaluation was, Randy said, "Sure. They want to get inside my head. But I'm telling you, they won't find anything. My brain is missing and I don't know where I left it."

Personal and Family History

Randy was the middle of three children. His father was an electrician and his mother taught elementary school. His older brother committed suicide at the age of 30—having struggled with depression most of his adult life. His father was never diagnosed with a mental disorder, but he was known for his paranoia and eccentric behaviors. Randy's mother had learned to be quiet and passive in order to appease her volatile husband. They rarely communicated with one another, and when they did it usually ended up in an argument.

Randy was a star high-school student and had a 3.8 GPA his first year in college. He was majoring in history. When a girlfriend broke up with him, his grades started to slip and everything about him seemed to change. He slept a lot, ate mostly junk food, and stopped going to class. He was placed on academic probation. He accused the Dean of being out to "get" him. He even suggested that the Dean took his girlfriend. Eventually Randy was expelled from the college.

He went home to his parents, where he became withdrawn and paranoid. Randy was angry with his father, who mostly ignored him. His mother was afraid of him, especially when he talked to himself and yelled at the television. Once when they were gone for the weekend, Randy pulled the cable box out of the wall and took a hammer to the television set, smashing in the sides. He told his parents that the cable box was taking thoughts from his brain and sending them to the television for all to hear. "My thoughts belong to me, and to no one else. Whoever tries to take them is going to have to pay."

A neighbor of his parents suggested that Randy ought to go to the community mental health clinic. Randy's father forbid it, saying no son of mine is going to a shrink. Shrinks are for "sissies." When the neighbor asked Randy if he wanted to get some help, Randy's response was, "I don't need help. Just turn off the damn TV."

One day, Randy went to the police department and said he wanted to file a criminal complaint.

“Against whom?” the officer on duty asked.

“Against WJTA-TV,” Randy said.

Sensing that Randy was a "bit off," he asked Randy, "What did they do to you?"

"Larceny—grand larceny," Randy said. "They stole my brain and I want it back."

The officer pretended to write up a complaint and told Randy he would give it to his supervisor for approval. That appeased Randy. When he left, the officer laughed and said, "Boy, it takes all kinds."

Shortly after this incident, Randy's aunt died and left him $50,000. Randy bought an old truck, the same one he has now, packed up his clothes and books and took off. He left his parents a note reading, "Thanks for nothing." That was the last they heard from Randy.

DSM-IV Checklist

Schizophrenia

At least two of the following symptoms, each present for a significant portion of time during a one-month period:

  1. Delusions.
  2. Hallucinations.
  3. Disorganized speech.
  4. Grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior.
  5. Negative symptoms.
  1. Functioning markedly below the level achieved prior to onset.
  2. Continuous signs of the disturbance for at leas six months, at least one month of which includes symptoms in full and active form (as opposed to attenuated form).

Based on APA, 2000, 1994

EVALUATION

Objective #1 Demonstrate appropriate use of abnormal human behavior concepts, guided by the criteria of distress, deviance, dysfunction, danger.

Question:

 Describe Randy’s case in terms of

  1. distress
  2. deviance
  3. dysfunction and
  4. danger

 SYNTHESIS

Objective #4 Understand the historical and cultural context of psychopathology.

Objective # 5 Critically examine the contextual influences on the theories and treatments of psychopathology.

Question:

 1.  If Randy were still living in a Sacramento suburb, what do you think might have been different in the way his situation was perceived and

2.  how might this change the outcome?

 3.  If Randy were living in the late 1880’s, how would he be diagnosed by the community and

4.  treated?

 ANALYSIS

Objective #2   Differentiate and evaluate theories and treatments of psychopathology.

Question:

1.  What genetic factors may have played a part in Randy’s schizophrenia?

2.  What biochemical abnormalities might account for Randy’s symptoms?

 3.  What might have been the role of family stress in Randy’s disorder?

4.  What does the sociocultural view of schizophrenia contribute to our understanding of Randy’s case?

5.   What medication would be most helpful for Randy?  Discuss why you chose this particular medication?

6.  What treatment modalities would be helpful to Randy in addition to medication?

APPLICATION

Objective #3 Display the responsible use of the DSM-IV, (and not to present themselves as professional users of it).

Questions:

 1.  Does Randy meet the criteria for schizophrenia?  If so, identify each of symptoms and/or behaviors that satisfy the symptom criteria for schizophrenia.

 2.  What type of schizophrenia does Randy display and what behavior supports your reason for selecting this?

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Three graded activities constitute the class assessment.

Graded Activities, Criteria, and Guidelines.

1.     Attendance, Cooperation, Collaboration, Participation, Presence, Promptness, Late Assignments. (32 points) Regular attendance and meaningful participation in discussions and activities are essential for meeting course objectives. It is your responsibility to make sure that you have signed the attendance sheet, or that you have been counted as “present” for each class. Students who are late to class often lose points because they forget to sign the attendance sheet.

Cooperation & Collaboration:
Choose a "buddy" to collect handouts or obtain information about the class proceedings in the event you need to be absent. I will distribute handouts and/or supplementary materials only once. I do not necessarily review what was covered in prior classes. "What did I miss?" questions are to be directed to your "buddy." Cooperative and collaborative learning requires you to effectively work together with other members of the class. These opportunities will emerge throughout the course. Another part of cooperative and collaborative learning involves peer review and feedback. It is important to learn to receive and provide feedback. The ability to critically analyze your own and the work of others tends to foster continuous improvement. Lastly, collaborative dialogue reflects preparedness for class and your ability to engage in scholarly dialogue using higher order thinking and reasoning skills. Each student is expected to dialogue in a scholarly manner.

Presence –
Impact of Attendance on Grades: Cooperating and collaborating effectively requires presence in class. Excused or unexcused absences result in zero points for class participation, cooperation, and collaboration. Two occasions of tardiness equals one absence. More than three absences of any kind results in a reduction of at least one letter grade for each absence after the first three absences. Students are responsible for lecture material, class dialogue, and interaction.

Promptness: Since tardiness is a form of absence, please be clear that arriving to class fifteen or more minutes late and/or leaving class fifteen or more minutes early constitutes an absence. And, absenting yourself from the class for more than fifteen minutes constitutes an absence even if your belongings are in the classroom and even though you may have signed the attendance sheet.

Late Assignments:
Assignments are due at the scheduled class time on the announced dates. This translates into: No late or make-up assignments are accepted. If you are absent from class when an assignment is due, your assignment must be in my email or in the dropbox by the date and time of the class when the assignment is due. Arriving to class with your assignment on your flash drive and not printed out ready to hand in or not emailed by class time is equivalent to not having your assignment.

 

2.     Core Assessment: See syllabus for details (60 points)

 

3.     Quizzes: Announced and unannounced (8 points)

Grading:

Course Grades

Each student’s feedback will be based solely on his/her performance. Review the feedback rubrics.

Grades: A=90% - 100% of the Maximum Points; B=80% - 89%; C=70% - 79%; D=60% - 69%; F=59% and less of the Maximum Points.

 

A Note about Grades as Indicators of Performance: Remember that “C” represents average or typical performance and is achieved by “fulfilling” requirements. “B” represents above average performance and is achieved by “significantly exceeding” requirements. “A” indicates excellence in performance and is achieved by “far exceeding” requirements.

 

Grade Work Sheet

(Keep track of your raw scores on this Grade Work Sheet.)

 

Area/Item to be Graded                                Maximum Raw Score Points      Your Raw Scores

                                                                 

Attendance, Cooperation, Collaboration, Participation            32                     ______________

Core Assessment                                                              60                     ______________

Quizzes                                                                            8                      ______________

Total                                                                                100                   ______________

 

A Note about Grade Inquiries: You may inquire about your grades for assignments and/or for the course. I am open to dialogue. If you choose to argumentatively contest a grade, your attendance record and all of your work for the class will be reviewed. Then, if needed, your grade will be adjusted higher or lower to accurately reflect your performance for the course.

Late Submission of Course Materials:
No late work is accepted.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
 

Guidelines for Scholarly Discussion and Behavior: I am committed to open, frank, and insightful dialogue in my classes. Diversity has many manifestations, including diversity of thought, opinions, and values. I expect all learners to be respectful of that diversity and to refrain from malicious commentary. Class dialogue and behavior is expected to conform to basic social etiquette and civility and not to distract from the learning environment. Review the Feedback Rubrics. Anything that is found to distract from the learning environment will be addressed. (For example, no chewing on a substance and spitting into a container while in the classroom.) Please abide by the following guidelines for class dialogue and behavior:

(1)If you disagree with someone, respond to the subject, not the person.

(2)Be respectful of the diversity of thought, opinion, personality and values.

(3)Maintain confidentiality. Although this instructor cannot guarantee or enforce that confidentiality be maintained, you are asked to respect the privacy and dignity of each person in class.

(4)Treat fellow classmates and what fellow classmates share with the honor and respect that you would like to receive in return.

(5)Turn off cell phones while in class. No electronic communication is allowed during class (except for assigned class presentations). Receiving a call or electronic communication while in class constitutes an absence. If you need to be present to communiqué during the class time-frame, you are deemed unable to be present in class. (Prior abuse has forfeited wise-use.)

(6)Please conduct research on incivility in the classroom if you need to learn about behavior that is considered socially appropriate and behavior that is conducive to a learning environment. According to the University of California, Santa Cruz (2008) (http://teaching.ucsc.edu/tips-civility.html#what ) a few examples of behaviors of incivility are:

Annoyances, minor disruptions—Arriving late and leaving early, talking or texting on a cell phone, reading newspaper, side conversations, packing up noisily before end of class. Together, these offenses can add up to more than just an annoyance.
Dominating discussion—The student who won’t let anyone else talk.
Aggressive challenges of teacher—The student who takes up class time questioning the authority of the professor, expressing anger about grading, or generally undermining your ability to teach.
Disputes between students; demeaning comments—When classroom discussion gets out of hand, or a student uses demeaning or stereotyping language.

While I encourage an atmosphere of reverence and respect as we talk about personalities, cultures, and many aspects of groups of people and how we are socialized, I invite you to cultivate and nourish a healthy sense of humor. It has been proven that humor enables us to release endorphins that facilitate physiological healing and psychological well being. Inviting you to laugh is meant to enhance the experience of processing the intricacies of our social skills, or lack thereof, in a manner that will foster personal and professional development. No offense to an individual, group, occupation, or to any situation is intended.

Best wishes and thank you for being in the class!

Sincerely,
Dee Dee Aspell

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

 

 

      Assignments for each date the class meets. Read each chapter of the text. Be prepared to expound on at least one salient concept from each chapter when asked to do so orally and/or in written form. Your responses will be solicited as contributions to the course dialog and/or as an assessment of your substantive theoretical knowledge of the assigned reading from the textbook.

 

Class #

Date

Topics

 

1

 

6/3

 

First class experience. Introductions and orientation to the course.

First Assignment Due Before the next class time (Counts for quiz points): Send me an email saying that you understand and acknowledge the guidelines set forth in the syllabus for this course. Be ready for a quiz on the content of the syllabus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ch. 1 Abnormal Psychology: Past and Present

 

 

 

 

 

Ch. 2 Research in Abnormal Psychology

 

 

 

 


Ch. 3 Models of Abnormality

 

 

 

 

 

Ch. 4 Clinical Assessment, Diagnosis, and Treatment

 

2

 

6/10

 

Ch. 5 Anxiety Disorders

 

 

 

 

 

Ch. 6 Stress Disorders

 

 

 

 

 

Ch. 7 Somatoform and Dissociative Disorders

 

3

 

6/17

 

Ch. 8 Mood Disorders

 

 

 

 

 

Ch. 9 Treatments for Mood Disorders

 

4

 

6/24

 

Ch. 10 Suicide






Ch. 11 Eating Disorders

 

 

 

 

 

Ch. 12 Substance-Related Disorders

 

 

 

 

 

Ch. 13 Sexual Disorders and Gender Identity Disorder

 

5

 

7/1

 

Ch. 14 Schizophrenia

 

 

 

 

 

Ch. 15 Treatments for Schizophrenia and Other Severe Mental Disorders

 

6

 

7/8

 

Ch. 16 Personality Disorders

 

 

7/12

 

Core Assessment is due in the Dropbox by midnight on July 12, 2009.

 

7

 

7/15

 

Ch. 17 Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence

 

 

 

 

 

Ch. 18 Disorders of Aging and Cognition

 

8

 

7/22

 

Ch. 19 Law, Society, and the Mental Health Profession

 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 89-90

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

Additional Information Regarding College
Level Performance Standards

Learners
are responsible for all information contained herein.


Expectations
regarding Written Work:
Writing skills, including
grammar, punctuation, paragraph structure, comprehensibility of content, and
other scholarly literacy skills are expected to be at college level.
The resources that are used for
grading scholarly writing, including citation and reference format is:
American Psychological Association. (2001). Publication
manual of the American Psychological Association
(5th ed.).
Washington, DC: American Psychological Association and American Psychological
Association. (2007). American
Psychological Association style guide to electronic references
(5th
ed.). Washington, DC.: American Psychological Association. All written work
will be graded on content as well as grammar, spelling, comprehensibility, professionalism,
and neatness. Students are expected to proof read their papers. Students are
particularly cautioned about phrases that are not sentences, run-on sentences,
pronoun usage (switching from singular to plural) and quoting without
attribution (use APA format).



Note: In this section, please do not be
distracted by the reference to Graduate
students and to Online students.  You will soon be deemed a college educated
individual. In general, in academia, college educated individuals tend to
demonstrate higher order thinking skills and performance. 


a.     Use critical thinking. Go to www.criticalthinking.org


b.     If you wish to improve your scholarly performance, go to www.parkonline.org
and thoroughly exhaust the resources for the course:
CDL 500 Critical
Thinking for Graduate Students. It is very possible that you will be tested on
the content that comprises the following navigational tabs located on the left
hand side of the page: Resources, Critical Thinking, Research, Bloom’s, and
Writing Help.


c.     I require
that you submit your paper a minimum of two times to Park’s Writing Help for
Online
Students. You may find the link
Organizing Your Research Paper particularly helpful. The writing assistance
that Park provides may help you check your paper for inadvertent oversights.


A Note about Academic Writing
and Dialogue:

As you may know, there are national initiatives to help students learn
scholarly writing, thinking, speaking across the curriculum. Quality
professional writing and scholarly dialogue necessitates the use of critical
thinking using the Universal Intellectual Standards and calls for demonstrating
an ability to compare, contrast, analyze, synthesize, and integrate
information. Learning how to clearly and concisely express your thoughts will
contribute to career advancement and increased occupational performance.
Completing assignments rightly using elements of thought, Bloom’s Taxonomy,
Universal Intellectual Standards, and demonstrating higher order thinking
skills for responding to the assignments for this course will enhance your grade.
Conduct a Google search on Universal
Intellectual Standards,
Bloom's
Taxonomy, Elements of Thought,
and
Critical Thinking
to learn more about intelligent thinking, speaking, and
writing. To get you started, here are a few links.



Links for Universal Intellectual
Standards.

http://www.criticalthinking.org/articles/universal-intellectual-standards.cfm

http://macs.citadel.edu/rudolphg/standards/


Links for
Bloom’s Taxonomy.


http://www.coun.uvic.ca/learn/program/hndouts/bloom.html

http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/bloom.html

http://www.officeport.com/edu/blooms.htm


Links for Elements of
Thought.

http://www.yorku.ca/rkenedy/critical_skills/student/critical_skills_web/critical_thinking_santarosa/link3.htm

http://www.instruction.greenriver.edu/mcvay/CT/EOT.htm


Links for Critical
Thinking.

http://www.criticalthinking.org/

http://www.criticalthinking.org/articles/index.cfm

http://www.csicop.org/si/9012/critical-thinking.html


Learning
Assistance for Student Success
:  The University provides learning assistance
for students seeking to improve their academic performance. You are expected to
contact your institutional student success center if you wish to improve your
scholarly performance.


 



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
Outcome #1.Critical evaluation of the case study using the abnormal human behavior concepts of the 4Ds—Distress, Deviance, Dysfunction and Danger                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
1. Answers to questions must identify examples from the case study of ALL FOUR of the following areas: 1.Distress 2.Deviance 3.Dysfunction 4.Danger 1. Answers to questions must identify examples from the case study of THREE  of the following areas: 1.Distress 2.Deviance 3.Dysfunction 4.Danger 1. Answers to questions must identify examples from the case study of TWO of the following areas: 1.Distress 2.Deviance 3.Dysfunction 4.Danger 1. Answers to questions identifies only ONE example or less of the following areas: 1.Distress 2.Deviance 3.Dysfunction 4.Danger 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
Outcome #4 & #5.Formulate the historical and cultural contexts and influences related to perceptions, outcome changes, diagnosis and treatment of the symptoms described in the case study                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Answers to questions need to cover ALL of the following areas: 1.Suburb perception: 2.Suburb outcome change: 1880s diagnosis: must reference some terminology appropriate to the period of time 3.1880s treatment: must reference at least 2 types of treatments appropriate to the period of time Answers to questions need to cover THREE-FOUR of the following areas: 1.Suburb perception: 2.Suburb outcome change: 1880s diagnosis: must reference some terminology appropriate to the period of time 3.1880s treatment: must reference at least 2 types of treatments appropriate to the period of time








 
Answers to questions need to cover TWO of the following areas: 1.Suburb perception: 2.Suburb outcome change: 1880s diagnosis: must reference some terminology appropriate to the period of time 3.1880s treatment: must reference at least 2 types of treatments appropriate to the period of time





 
Answers to questions need to cover ONE OR LESS of the following areas: 1.Suburb perception: 2.Suburb outcome change: 1880s diagnosis: must reference some terminology appropriate to the period of time 3.1880s treatment: must reference at least 2 types of treatments appropriate to the period of time





 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
Outcome # 2 Differentiate the theories and treatments of psychopathology that explain the disorder described in the case study                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
1. Answers to questions need to cover ALL SIX of the following areas: 1.Genetic Factors: must mention specific genetic factors 2.Biochemical Abnormalities: must mention specific biochemical abnormalities 3.Family Stress:  Must include specific family stressors 4.Sociocultural Contribution:  Must mention specific Sociocultural contributions. 5.Medication:  Must mention specific medication (most appropriate considering research findings) 6.Treatment Modalities:  Must mention types of therapy (not medication) appropriate to the client's needs Answers to questions need to cover FOUR-FIVE of the following areas: 1.Genetic Factors: must mention specific genetic factors 2.Biochemical Abnormalities: must mention specific biochemical abnormalities 3.Family Stress:  Must include specific family stressors 4.Sociocultural Contribution:  Must mention specific Sociocultural contributions. 5.Medication:  Must mention specific medication (most appropriate considering research findings) 6.Treatment Modalities:  Must mention types of therapy (not medication) appropriate to the client's needs





 
1. Answers to questions need to cover THREE of the following areas: 1.Genetic Factors: must mention specific genetic factors 2.Biochemical Abnormalities: must mention specific biochemical abnormalities 3.Family Stress:  Must include specific family stressors 4.Sociocultural Contribution:  Must mention specific Sociocultural contributions. 5.Medication:  Must mention specific medication (most appropriate considering research findings) 6.Treatment Modalities:  Must mention types of therapy (not medication) appropriate to the client's needs Answers to questions need to cover TWO OR LESS of the following areas: 1.Genetic Factors: must mention specific genetic factors 2.Biochemical Abnormalities: must mention specific biochemical abnormalities  3.Family Stress:  Must include specific family stressors 4.Sociocultural Contribution:  Must mention specific Sociocultural contributions. 5.Medication:  Must mention specific medication (most appropriate considering research findings) 6.Treatment Modalities:  Must mention types of therapy (not medication) appropriate to the client's needs





 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
Outcomes # 3-Classify the case study disorder's criteria of behaviors, level of functioning and continuity, the specific type of disorder and the behaviors of the disorder described in case study                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Answers to questions need to cover ALL FIVE of the following areas:1.Criteria I of disorder: behaviors: 2.Criteria II of disorder: level of functioning: 3. Criteria III of disorder: Continuity 4.Specific type of disorder: 5.Specific behaviors related to disorder: Answers to questions need to cover FOUR of the following areas: 1.Criteria I of disorder: behaviors: 2.Criteria II of disorder: level of functioning: 3.Criteria III of disorder: Continuity 4.Specific type of disorder: 5.Specific behaviors related to disorder: 1. Answers to questions need to cover THREE of the following areas: 1.Criteria I of disorder: behaviors: 2.Criteria II of disorder: level of functioning: 3. Criteria III of disorder: Continuity 4.Specific type of disorder:5.Specific behaviors related to disorder: 1. Answers to questions need to cover TWO OR LESS of the following areas: 1. Criteria I of disorder: behaviors: 2.Criteria II of disorder: level of functioning: 3.Criteria III of disorder: Continuity 4.Specific type of disorder: 5.Specific behaviors related to disorder: 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Answers to questions were organized, focused and statements were effectively supported Answers to questions were organized, focus may not be clear at times and support for statements was minimal Answers were minimally organized, focus was frequently difficult to determine and statements were inconsistently supported Answers were challenging to read due to disorganization, lack of focus and statements were not supported 
Technical Skill in Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Proofreading was effective and there were few, if any grammatical and/or structural errors and the errors were not distracting for the reader More effective proofreading was needed with more grammatical and/or structural errors which was somewhat distracting for the reader Proofreading was inconsistent and grammatical and/or structural errors were so numerous that the reader was seriously distracted Proofreading was not effective and grammatical and/or structural errors were so frequent that it was too challenging to read 

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Last Updated:4/17/2009 3:13:46 PM