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Education Major Version

EDU 210 The School as a Social System
Penn, Patricia W.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

EDU 210 The School as a Social System

Semester

S2T 2010 DL

Faculty

Penn, Patricia W.

Title

Associate Professor of Education/Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

PhD - Curriculum and Instruction

Office Location

online

Office Hours

online

Daytime Phone

316-304-6520 (cell)

E-Mail

Patricia.Penn@park.edu

Semester Dates

Mar. - May 2010

Class Days

online

Class Time

online

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 

Required:


Ornstein, A. & Levine, D. (2008). Foundations of Education, 10th ed. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.

Ryan, K., & Cooper, J. M. (2007). Kaleidoscope: Readings in education, 11th ed., NY:

                    Houghton Mifflin.

Subscription, Foliotek: Education Majors Only

Recommended:

American Psychological Association. (2001). Publication Manual of the

        American Psychological Association (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Mondale, Sarah and Patton, Sarah B.(Eds.). (2001). School: The Story of

       American Public Education. Boston: Beacon Press.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.

http://www.ednews.org/
http://www.gao.gov (search GAO-03631 and Rebell & Hunter, Highly Qualified Teachers in PHI DELTA KAPPAN May 2004)
http://www.educationnext.org
http://www.epaa.asu.edu
http://www.aft.org/research/vouchers
http://aera.net/pubs/er

Course Description:
EDU210 (MGE): The School as a Social System: A survey of the historical, philosophical and legal foundations of American education. Also a study of the various school systems in the United States. Selected educational problems, issues and practices will be examined in light of current social conditions.3:0:3. Prerequisite:  EDUC 325 (EN325)

Educational Philosophy:
The professor draws from the foundations of education and evidenced-based theory in the context of current best practice in the field of education. The class is organized in the style of a seminar, including techniques such as:  in-class dialogue, demonstration, discussion board, interviews, library/internet research, and collaborative group projects.  There will be assignments which require students to work in small groups or cohorts; students will also have an online partner with whom they will work together on the development and editing of their educational philosophies, which is the major assignment.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify, describe, and explain key concepts related to the USA's historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in the field of education.
  2. Develop a comprehensive synthesis on the cultural context of education by focusing on teachers and learners, teachers and teaching, students and schools, and schools and society.
  3. Define, describe, and analyze five or more critical issues of diversity in schools.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and effective use of professional literature in the field of education.
  5. Examine the teaching profession through personal reflections and by engaging in thoughtful discussions with peers.
  6. Write a personal philosophy of education grounded in six or more beliefs, supported by three or more evidenced-based theories, which are also tied to best practice within the field of education.
  7. Demonstrate a thorough applied knowledge on the concepts and operations of electronic assessment and portfolio systems.


Core Assessment:

All Park University courses must include a core assessment that measures the relevant Core Learning Outcomes. The purpose of this assessment is to determine if expectations have been met concerning mastery of learning outcomes across all instructional modalities.  The core assessment for this course is the philosophy of education.  The philosophy will be developed throughout the course and completed at the end of the 4th module. (200 points)  While this activity is required, its weight related to the grade computation is to be at least 20% of the total grade for the course.  (Rubric Attached) {Assesses outcomes 1, 2, 3, 5, 6}


 

Link to Class Rubric

Grading:
 

Product Requirements

1. Reflective Journal Assignment

            The process of writing improves our understanding of course content. The purpose of this assignment is to facilitate the formation of your educational philosophy. For each module, you will be asked to reflect and make journal entries on the Directed Questions on each module: 

·         For Module I, you are to reflect on questions in Part One of Schools  as related to your philosophy and future role in education (what, where and who you plan to teach). This gives you an opportunity to think about your philosophy of education, which is one of the major final assignments for the course.

·         For on Module II, you are to reflect questions noted on Part Two of Schools and your learning associated with issues of the development of the public school system in the USA..

·         On Module III, you are to reflect questions tied to Part Three of Schools, specifically, on your thoughts on diversity, especially on the “separate, but unequal” realities of the story or history of American Public Education.  

·         Finally, for Module IV, you are to describe your perspective on questions listed for Part Four of Schools the lecture on A Nation at Risk? Include your perspective on school reform in your reflections for this module.

 

No style requirements are imposed on your journal assignment and no revisions will be required. Your writings should be in a legible format that works for you. Your reflection is due at the end of the Modules 1, 2, 3, and 4 and is to be e-mailed to the instructor. (25 pts./reflection or 100 pts.)

 

2. Educator Interview

 

            Students, who are pursuing teaching as a profession, need exposure to educators who are currently practicing. Students, who are pursuing another profession, also need exposure to educators who are currently practicing An interview protocol (questions for your interview) is included in Module I under the section for Activities. Use the protocol to begin your interview. You are encouraged to add your own questions before or during the interview. A typed write-up of the questions, answers, and summary of what you learned from the interview is to be e-mailed to the instructor by the end of the 2nd week of class. 75 pts

3. Kaleidoscope Readings, Discussion, and REACT Assignments: Students are assigned all the Kaleidoscope Readings in Part Two, Three, Five, Six, Seven, and Nine.   In addition, students will be assigned to cohort groups and will be responsible for participating in Threaded Discussions on 3 REACT responses to 3 assigned online Kaleidoscope readings, which are located in the student online resources for this text (one reading per module) are to be e-mailed to your Cohort Group Leader. The Cohort Group Leader will summarize the REACTs for the group, which will count for his/her own REACT assignment. The Cohort Leader is to send all the Group’s REACTS to the Professor on due dates. (25 points per REACT = 75 pts) You will receive your Cohort Group assignment during the first week of class. Also, for each module, the group will select a Cohort leader, who will collect reflections from all in the Cohort Group, and will write a 1-2 page summary of all reflections written for the group. The group will consist of 3 members, and each member will have the opportunity to serve as a leader for the Cohort Summary paper and group discussion on the Kaleidoscope readings. Students will obtain participation points (10 points per Module discussion). Each student is expected to provide 1-2 comments during each of the threaded discussions located in Module I, II, and III. The format for the REACT papers and rubric for the threaded discussion participation points follow:

REACT Format for Kaleidoscope Readings: R-Introduce topic of REACT paper. (1-2 paragraphs: 5 pts)

E-State your emotional response or how you feel about a topic. (1-2

    Paragraphs: 5 pts)

A-How does this topic apply to your practice as an educator? (1-2

     paragraphs: 5 pts)

C-Describe your reflections on the topic. (3-4 paragraphs: 5 pts)

T-Theoretical base (Kaleidoscope Text Page #’s : 5 pts)

 

4.  Threaded Discussion Assignments: 

 

For Modules I, II, and III, students will participate in REACT threaded discussions on their REACT papers as described in the explanation above on the REACT paper assignment.

For Modules I, II, III, IV, students will participate in threaded discussions on an assigned topic noted in each Module’s threaded discussion section. The assigned topics are:

Module I:      Discuss your reflections on your Educator Interview.

 

Module II:      Discuss your reflections on developing the draft of your Educational

Philosophy paper.

 

Module III:    Discuss your reflections on diversity as presented in the film for

Module III.

 

Module IV:    Discuss your reflections on your Final Educational Philosophy Paper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grading Rubric:

 

Threaded Discussion Participation Rubric (10 points for Module I, II, III = 30 points for the REACT Discussion and 10 points for Module I, II, III, & IV = 40 points for the Module Discussion)=70 points. 

 

 

Points:            Criteria for Threaded Discussions:

 

9-10                                  Discussion is clear, relevant, and insightful. It goes beyond the main

points and reflects both strong content knowledge, application, and synthesis.

 

7-8                  Discussion is clear, relevant, and insightful. It goes beyond the main

points and examples; it also reflects strong content knowledge and synthesis.

 

4-6                  Discussion is clear and relevant. It includes the main points and      

                        examples of major points.

 

0-3                  Discussion is vague, not relevant, and off topic.

 

 

 

 

 

5. Personal Philosophy Paper

The formation of a philosophy of education is a developmental process shaped by our life’s experiences and education. Your beliefs about knowledge, where it comes from, and how you both learn and teach are already formed. This assignment is designed to facilitate your examination and expression of those beliefs by giving you the opportunity to journal on your learning as related to your beliefs. The total length of the paper should be approximately four to six typed pages (written for an audience of school administrators).  Students will have the opportunity to work with an online partner throughout the class. Partners will serve as the “official editors” of one another’s philosophy papers; as editors, you will be responsible for editing the first and final drafts of your partner’s philosophy paper.   You will be given 20 points for editing (10 for the 1st draft and 10 for the final draft).  The Philosophy Paper is to be e-mailed to your online partner and the professor by the end of the 4th week (1st rough draft) and the 8th week (final draft) of class. Total: 250 pts. (230 + 20 editing points) for the paper.

Additional Information on the Peer Revision of the Educational Philosophy:

During week 4 and 8, you will need to send comments and revisions to your online partner and, after editing and sharing with your partner, send it to the professor to earn credit for your work as a peer reviewer. You will earn 20 points for your work on the 1st draft (10 points) and final draft (10 points) by sending a copy of your revisions and editing suggestions back to your on-line partner and to your instructor.

Here is a rubric format for you to use to give your input and earn full credit for your help:

      Read the paper for its content.  Then:

1.  Summarize the paper in 2 or 3 sentences.

2.  Tell in one short paragraph what you like about the paper.  What interests you? What would you like to hear more about?

3.  What questions do you have?  What is not clear to the reader?  What do you not understand? 

4.  What suggestions do you have for making the paper better?

5.  Read the paper again for spelling and grammar.  Look for “flying prepositions”, prepositions without objects, over-use of the determinant pronouns, “this, that, these, those” in lieu of the noun or noun phrase, non-agreement in number of subject and verb. 

You may use any editing format you chose, or simply forward back verbal comments.  As you have seen, when using MSWord, I like to use the comment box options.  By clicking on "insert comment" or simply using the comment box on the toolbar, you are able to attach comments as you read, then simply forward to your reader. Check for APA format on references.

6.  At the end of the paper, attach your name as editor, write the date you received the paper, and write the date you return the paper.

7. Send your revisions back to your on-line partner, and also send me a copy so that I can award you up to a total of 20 points (10 points per editing assignment) for your successful completion of these assignments.

6. Final Exam = 25 points

            The final exam is on the Reflection assignment for Module 4. It is worth 25

points.

  7. Education Students Expectations: Due to the admission requirements to the School for Education,

Education Students will be expected to:

Complete and submit to the instructor a self-evaluation on the SFE Disposition instrument (The instructor will provide the Disposition evaluation and answer form.)

Submit their final educational philosophy to Foliotek (The instructor is to be contacted if students have not purchased Foliotek and need purchase information.)

 

Note on module activities, practice assignments, and assessments: Modules I, II, III, and IV

Modules will provide threaded discussion topics tied to the Kaleidoscope readings, practice assignments with your assigned learning partner (explained at 1st Meeting), and assessments in a multiple choice and short answer section format. 

  Grading

Students will be expected to:

Complete module activities, practice assignments, and assessments (Pass/Fail: score of 80% = Pass)

Kaleidoscope REACT papers (25 pts/paper = 75 pts)

Threaded discussion on Kaleidosope Readings and REACT Papers (10 pts per Module I, II, and III = 30 pts.)

Threaded discussion on each module (10 pts per Module I, II, III, and IV = 40 pts.)

Complete personal philosophy of education (230 pts. + 20 pts. for peer editing) Core Assessment

Educator Interview and Written Summary (75 pts.)

Reflective Journal (100 pts.)

Final Exam (25 pts.)

Total Points (595 pts.)

Additional Admission to School for Education (SFE) Expectations:

Education Students will be expected to:

Complete and submit to the instructor a self-evaluation on the SFE Disposition instrument

Place their Educational Philosophy on Foliotek

ü All students are expected to be responsible for the assigned readings, activities, and evaluations. .

ü This course follows the policies of Park University.

ü I am looking forward to our online time of learning together.


Late Submission of Course Materials:
  Students must follow the criteria outlined and abide by the due dates for each project. Late submissions are accepted only with prior approval from the professor. Twenty percent of the total points (for the project) will be deducted on late submissions.  It is the teacher candidate’s responsibility to contact the professor prior to due date if they do not understand the criteria for the assignments as explained.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
 

Reading/Class Participation

Teacher candidates are required to read the textbook chapters in order to participate in class discussion boards and online activities.  Discussion boards include dialogue and problem solving throughout the semester. Individual teacher candidates will receive points for class participation and interaction.

Writing Assignments

 Scoring guides that include format for written assignments are provided for the course. Teacher candidates should seek the Writing Center to ensure that papers do not bear any technical writing and typological errors. Teacher candidates must cite references using APA style within the contents of the paper. Teacher candidates should write papers in order to explain all information (assume that the reader does not understand the information presented). All written papers should be saved for the purpose of revision.  Teacher candidates are allowed to submit one revision for each written project if the grade is less than ninety percent and submitted on time. The due date for the revised papers is one week (with the exception of the last week of class) after they have been returned to students.

Visiting Programs


If the educator interview is conducted on the educator’s school campus, it is essential that students always remember that they are representatives of Park University. Professional dress and behaviors are required during all visits to the school sites.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

EDU 210 Online Module Class Structure, Schedule, and General Information

Welcome! I am looking forward to hearing from each of you and getting to know you in the coming weeks. The general instructions for our online EDU 210: The School as a Social System are covered in the following descriptions of the class structure and class schedule; in addition, general information on the class is provided.

A. Class Module Structure: The Module Structure is the same for all modules (Module I, II, III, IV). While the content, activities, and assessment will vary, the features of each module will be the same. The structural design of the modules has been based on the extensive research by Dr. Ed Meyen, Director of the e-Learning Design Lab of the University of Kansas.

The conceptual model for the modules includes an orientation to each module followed by four distinct levels:

Orientation:  Module Orientation—This will provide an overview and explanation of the content map of each module.

Level 1:           Module Lesson Supports: This level is designed to SUPPORT your Learning. This level is designed to assist you as you learn. The glossary, notes, and outlines are designed to support your reading of the Ornstein text. The Kaleidoscope online reading, which students are to use for their Cohort Group project, is available both in text and audio format. Finally, each module has a video, which is aligned with the central theme of each module.  

Level 2:           Module Instruction: The module’s content is contained in this

section. If you attempt to complete Level 3 (Practice) and Level 4

(Assessment) before completing Level 2 or the Instructional level, you may undergo some frustration; however, if students would like to do their own pre-testing of their knowledge and understanding, they are welcome to go to Practice and Assessment before Instruction.

Level 3:           Module Practice: After completing Level 2 or the Module

Instruction section, practice activities or exercises are available. The practice activities are designed to help you practice the applications taught throughout each module. Guidelines are included to allow you to determine if you are carrying out the practice activities satisfactorily. There is no requirement as to when the practice exercises should be carried out. Many of the practice activities will require you to apply skills to contextual or field-based aspects of education.   Practice activities will vary in type. Examples include application, generalization, and replication of solutions.

Level 4:           Module Assessment: The evaluations, located in Level 4

(Assessment) are an integral part of all modules. They are designed to provide feedback on your performance.   The intent of this level is to be instructional in nature. The Ornstein quiz for each Module is in the ACE format, located in the Support Resources for the Ornstein text. This quiz is self-checking; please note that you are to send a copy of your results to your Professor to get credit for this assignment. You can send the copy to the Professor through the ACE quiz link to your instructor found when you go to the Student Companion Site and Resource Section using your Pass Key with the Kaleidoscope text. The evaluations cover all levels of Bloom’s taxonomy.   Evaluations include these options: knowledge or recall/factual, application, decision making and analysis, and synthesis of product development.

module.

You do not have to follow a linear path through each module, but you do need to progress sequentially from Module I to Module IV. You will access the class through Parkonline.org found under Academics on the Park University home page. All the course materials you will need to succeed will be available in Modules, which you can access through the EDU 210 online class. You will log into the class; then go to the home page to locate the links to the Modules.

B. Class Schedule:  On the Course Home Page, you will find links for each of the 8 weeks. You are to start on Module 1-Week 1 and start with the instructions found in the Module Orientation. Class Schedule: The class is divided into 4 Modules. Each Module is scheduled the 2 weeks of class. At the end of the last Friday of each Module, module assignments are due. To receive credit, all assignments for the 4 Modules must be submitted by midnight on Friday of the 2nd week of each module:

Module I:                   Week 1 and 2

Module II:                   Week 3 and 4

Module III:                 Week 5 and 6

Module IV:                 Week 7 and 8

Note: Any exceptions to these submission dates must be approved in advance by the instructor. 

 

Videos: Each module has one video link.

C. General Information: Most importantly, you will have major difficulties in this class if you get behind. Remember that you can submit your work any time during the Module period, listed above. Try out the video format and quiz format early each week. That way, if you have problems with the technology, you can go to the Get Help and/or Help and Resources links on the home page of the class to find a way to help. In order to earn credit on the Ornstein ACE quizzes, you will need to pass each one with a score of 80%. You can access these on the Student Resources site, which you can access through the Pass Key found in the front of the Ornstein text (Please note: To get the correct Pass Key you must have the 10th edition of Ornstein).   The online Cohort Group, Threaded Discussions, and Online Partner assignments, which are described below, are very important components of this class.  

Cohort Group: You will be working with an online cohort group of 3-4 people and will participate in threaded discussions with your cohort group. You will start these discussions no later than the 2nd week of Module I and continue these through Modules II and III. 

Online Threaded Cohort Discussions: You will start the threaded discussions with your Cohort Group during the 2nd week of the first Module.   The topic of the threaded discussion will be the assigned REACT. Each cohort member will prepare their own REACT paper, which is turned into both the group leader and the Professor. Each Cohort member will share their papers with your cohort group through the assigned Cohort group leader. For each module, an assigned cohort leader will work with the group in constructing a group REACT representing a synthesis of the group’s learning related to 3 assigned Kaleidoscope readings.

Online Partner: You will have an online class partner who will work with you in reading and revising your philosophy of education paper. This peer revision will begin in Module II at which time you will write your first draft. You will e-mail the first draft to your online partner first and, after peer editing, e-mail your 1st draft to your Professor. Then, in the 2nd week of Module II, you will e-mail your final draft to your online partner first and, again, after peer editing, e-mail your final draft to your Professor.

Contacting Online Partner and Cohort Group: Please email your online partner and cohort group members as soon as possible.   This will make it easier to get in touch with each other during the class.   The online partnerships are an important component of the class. If, for any reason, your group membership is not working well, please contact your professor. We will work together in resolving issues and getting back on track. 

Module I: The Common School: 1700-1900

Weeks 1 & 2 Orientation:

  1. Lesson Supports
    1. Outlines: Ornstein Chapters 4 & 6    
    2. Notes: Ornstein Chapters 4 & 6
    3. Glossary: Ornstein Chapters 4 & 6
    4. Kaleidoscope Readings Part Six: Foundations; Cohort Project: Online: Ernest L. Boyer, The Educated Person
    5. The Common School: PBS Film Series
  2. Instruction 
    1. Preview: School: The Story of American Public Education School; Part 1   
    2. Presentation: Lecture
    3. Activities:  Description of the Educator Interview activity and REACT activity and discussion for Kaleidoscope Readings
  1. Practice 

      Educator Interview

Threaded Discussion on Kaleidoscope Readings REACTs

  1. Assessment on CLO #1, #4, #5   
    1. REACT Paper (25 pts.)
    2. Evaluation Quiz on Ornstein Chapters 4 & 6 (Pass/Fail; Pass=80%)
    3. Directed Questions for Reflective Journal (25 pts.)
    4. Educator Interview Paper (75 pts.)
    5. Threaded Discussion Participation (10 pts.)

Module II: As American As Public School: 1900-1950

 

Week 3 & 4 Orientation:

 

1.Lesson Supports

a.       Outlines: Ornstein Chapter 5

b.      Notes: Ornstein Chapters 5

c.       Glossary: Ornstein Chapters 5

d.      Kaleidoscope Readings Part Three and Five: Instruction; Cohort Project: Online: Reading: R. Marzano and J. Marzano,  The Key to Classroom Management

e.       As American As Public School: PBS Film Series

  1. Instruction 
    1. Preview: School: The Story of American Public Education School; Part 2 
    2. Presentation: Lecture
    3. Activities: Description of the activity related to the 1st draft of the Educational Philosophy and REACT activity and discussion for Kaleidoscope Readings
  1. Practice 

      a. Complete 1st Draft of Your Educational Philosophy in Your Journal

          First, share and edit with your online Learning Partner; after editing, submit

           to the Professor

                  b. Threaded Discussion on Kaleidoscope Readings REACTs

  1. Assessment on CLO #2, #4, #5    
    1. REACT Paper (25 pts.)
    2. Evaluation Quiz on Ornstein Chapter 5   (Pass/Fail; Pass=80%)
    3. Directed Questions for Reflective Journal (25 pts.)
    4. 1st Draft of Educational Philosophy Edit (10 pts.)
    5. Threaded Discussion Participation (10 pts.)

Module III: Separate and Unequal: 1950-1980

 

Week 5 & 6 Orientation:

 

  1. Lesson Supports
    1. Outlines: Ornstein Chapters 11 & 12    
    2. Notes: Ornstein Chapters 11 & 12    
    3. Glossary: Ornstein Chapters 11 & 12    
    4. Kaleidoscope Readings Part Two, Seven, and Nine: Students; Cohort Project: Online: Reading: Ruby K. Payne, Understanding and Working with Students and Adults from Poverty
    5. Separate and Unequal: PBS Film Series
  2. Instruction 
    1. Preview: School: The Story of American Public Education School; Part 3               
    2. Presentation: Lecture
    3. Activities: REACT for Kaleidoscope Readings
  3. Practice 

      Threaded Discussion on Kaleidoscope Readings REACTs

  1. Assessment on CLO #3, #4, #5      
    1. REACT Paper (25 pts.)
    2. Evaluation Quiz on Ornstein Chapters 11 & 12   (Pass/Fail; Pass=80%)
    3. Directed Questions for Reflective Journal (25 pts.)
    4. Threaded Discussion Participation (10 pts.)

 

Module IV: A Nation at Risk?: 1980-2008

Week 7 & 8 Orientation

 

  1. Lesson Supports
    1. Outlines: Ornstein Chapters 13 & 16    
    2. Notes: Ornstein Chapters 13 & 16
    3. Glossary: Ornstein Chapters 13 & 16
    4. A Nation at Risk: PBS Film Series
  2. Instruction 
    1. Preview: School: The Story of American Public Education School; Part 4  
    2. Presentation: Lecture
  3. Practice 

Complete your Educational Philosophy and edit your partner’s final Educational Philosophy paper

  1. Assessment on CLO #4 and #6 and #7   
    1. Evaluation Quiz on Ornstein Chapters 13 & 16   (Pass/Fail; Pass=80%)
    2. Directed Questions for Reflective Journal (25 pts.)
    3. Final Philosophy Edit (10 pts.)
    4. Final Philosophy (230 pts.)

EDU 210 --Tentative Class Schedule

Week:

Module:

Assignments:

1

Module I: The Common School, 1770-1900

Introduction to EDU 210 Online Module Format

Ø      Assigned Readings for Module I: Ornstein, Chapters 4 & 6, and  

Kaleidoscope Readings Part Six; Online Reading: Ernest L. Boyer, The Educated Person

Ø       Start Module 1 Online

2

Module I-Cont.

Ø      Complete PBS Film on The Common School

Ø      Complete Module I Assignments by Friday, Week 2

1. Summary of Educator Interview Due

2. Reflective Journal Due: Reflection is to  

    Respond to Directed Questions for Module I

3. REACT: Threaded Discussion Synthesis Due on

    Cohort Group Reflections on Kaleidoscope

    REACTs and REACT Paper Due

4. Threaded Discussions Participation on REACTS and Module Topic

5. Complete Evaluation Quiz for Ornstein Chapters 4 & 6

3

Module II:

As American As Public School, 1900-1950

Ø      Complete PBS Film on As American As Public School

Ø      Assigned Readings for Module II: Ornstein Chapter 5 and Kaleidoscope Readings Part Three and Five; Online Reading: Marzano, The Key to Classroom Management

4

Module II:

As American As Public School, 1900-1950

Ø      Complete Module II Assignments by Friday of Week 4

1. Reflective Journal Due: Respond to respond to Directed Questions for Module II

        2. 1st Draft on Personal Philosophy of Education Due

        3. Threaded Discussions Participation on REACTS and 

            Module Topic

        4. Threaded Discussion Synthesis Due

        Cohort Group Reflection on Kaleidoscope

        REACTs and REACT Paper

        5. Complete Evaluation Quiz for Ornstein Chapter 5

5

Module III:

Separate and Unequal, 1950-1980

Ø      Complete PBS Film on Separate and Unequal

Ø      Assigned Readings for Module III: Ornstein,

    Chapters 11 & 12 and Kaleidoscope Readings Part Two, Seven, and Nine; Online Reading: Ruby Payne, Understanding and Working with Students and Adults from Poverty

 

6

Module III:

Separate and Unequal, 1950-1980

Ø      Complete Module III Assignments by Friday of Week 6

1. Reflective Journal Due: Respond to respond to Directed Questions for Module III

        2. Threaded Discussion Synthesis Due

        Cohort Group Reflection on Kaleidoscope

        REACTs and REACT Paper

        3. Threaded Discussions Participation on REACTS and

             Module Topic

        4. Complete Evaluation Quiz for Ornstein Chapters 11 &

           12

7

Module IV:

A Nation at Risk?

1980-2008

Ø      Complete PBS Film on A Nation at Risk?

Ø      Assigned Readings for Module IV: Ornstein, Chapters 13 & 16

8

Module IV:

A Nation at Risk?

1980-2000

Ø      Complete Module IV Assignments by Friday of Week 8

1. Reflective journal due: Reflection is to Respond to

    Directed Questions for Module IV

        2. Threaded Discussions Participation on REACTS and

             Module Topic                                                                            

        3.  Final Personal Philosophy of Education Due

        4. Final Philosophy Edit Due

        5. Complete Evaluation Quiz for Ornstein Chapters 13  

                & 16 and take Final Exam with assigned monitor.

 

Note: Education students complete self-evaluation on disposition instrument and submit philosophy to Foliotek.


Competency

Exceeds Expectation

(3)

Meets Expectation

(2)

Does Not Meet Expectations

(1)

No Evidence (0)

Critical Thinking

Analysis, Synthesis, and Evaluation

Outcomes –            1, 2, 3, 5, 6.

·         The artifact examined and analyzed the historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in education. 

·         Developed a comprehensive synthesis of evidenced-based theory and practice related to teachers and learners in the context of schools in our society.

·         Presented and defended an educational philosophy reflecting 7 or more beliefs and more than 3 beliefs are supported by evidenced-based theory and practice in the field of education.

·         The artifact analyzed the historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in education. 

·         Developed a synthesis of evidenced-based theory and practice related to teachers and learners in the context of schools in our society.

·         Presented and defended an educational philosophy reflecting 6 or more beliefs and more than 3 beliefs are supported by evidenced-based theory and practice in the field of education..

·         The artifact provided a discussion on the historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in education. 

·         Provided an essay on evidenced-based theory and practice related to teachers and learners in the context of schools in our society.

·         Presented and defended an educational philosophy reflecting 5 or fewer beliefs and less than 3 beliefs are supported by evidenced-based theory and practice in the field of education.. 

·         The artifact presents ideas that are not documented or related to sound educational theory or philosophy. Contains misuse of terms, which do not reflect mastery of sound educational theory or philosophy.

Content

Application

Outcomes –            1, 2, 3, 5, 6

  • The artifact applied both knowledge and understanding of the foundations of education, evidenced-based theory, and practice in education; personal examples or insights are included.
  • The artifact or philosophy reflects exemplary insights of the writer’s future within their chosen professional field; students, who plan to teach, should write to their future as an educator.
  • The artifact moderately applied both knowledge and understanding of the foundations of education, evidenced-based theory, and practice in education; personal examples or insights are included.
  • The artifact or philosophy reflects appropriate insights of the writer’s future within their chosen professional field.
  • The artifact minimally applied both knowledge and understanding of the foundations of education, evidenced-based theory, and practice in education; personal examples or insights are included.
  • The artifact or philosophy reflects little insight into the writer’s future within their chosen professional field.

Artifact presents confusing verbiage that is difficult to follow and lacks professional language. 

Technical Skills

Whole Artifact

Outcomes –            1, 2, 3, 5, 6

·         The artifact provided evidence on the mastery of the demands of writing an educational philosophy. A deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues is documented through the use of a professional language and style and efficacy in its organization. The philosophy’s thesis is thoroughly and persuasively argued; organization is logical, supporting arguments are linked and arranged persuasively. Transitions create a unified philosophy. 

·         For education majors, the philosophy reflects a relationship to SPA standards, MoSTEP standards, and education portfolio standards.

·         A minimum of 4 pages with no errors in written conventions (no slang) ; (correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling). 

  • The artifact moderately provided evidence on the mastery of the demands of writing an educational philosophy. A deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues is documented through the use of a professional language and style and efficacy in its organization. The philosophy’s thesis is thoroughly and persuasively argued; organization is logical, supporting arguments are linked and arranged persuasively. Transitions create a unified philosophy. 
  • For education majors, the philosophy reflects a relationship to SPA standards, MoSTEP standards, and education portfolio standards.
  • A minimum of 3 pages with no errors in written conventions (no slang) ; (correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling). 

·         The artifact minimally artifact provided evidence on the mastery of the demands of writing an educational philosophy. A deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues is documented through the use of a professional language and style and efficacy in its organization. The philosophy’s thesis is thoroughly and persuasively argued; organization is logical, supporting arguments are linked and arranged persuasively. Transitions create a unified philosophy. 

·         For education majors, the philosophy reflects a relationship to SPA standards, MoSTEP standards, and education portfolio standards.

·         Less than 3 pages with several errors in written conventions (slang, correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling). 

·         Multiple incorrect sentence structures, spellings, and/or grammar included. Less than two pages with multiple errors in written conventions (slang, correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling

Competency

Exceeds Expectation

(3)

Meets Expectation

(2)

Does Not Meet Expectations

(1)

No Evidence (0)

Other Literacies

(or Disciplinary Competency)

MoSTEP 1.2.4.1; 1.2.2.1, 1.2.2,2, 1.2.2.3, 1.2.9.1, 1.2.9.2, 1.2.9.3, Conceptual Framework knowledge 1A, 1D, 3F, Skills 2A, 3C, Dispositions 3B, 3D, 4C, 2B, 2A, 5A

Accurate presentation of 7 or more beliefs. More than three of the beliefs are supported by an appropriate, respected philosopher (ies) or theorists. Personal examples or insights are included. Essay demonstrates a deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues and written in a professional style and unique or enticing organization. Essay reflects insights of the writer’s future as an educator. Correct sentence structure, punctuation, and grammar.   Transitions create unified essay. Minimum four pages. Professional language/ No slang terms.   

Accurate presentation of 6 beliefs. Three of the beliefs are supported by an appropriate, respected philosopher(ies) or theorists. Essay written in a professional style, with clear and correct terminology, and with logical organization. Essay demonstrates a grasp of educational terminology, ideas, and issues. Essay reflects insights of the writer’s future as an educator. Correct sentence structure that utilizes transitions. Minimum three pages.    Professional language/no slang terms.

Presentation of 5 or fewer beliefs. Less than three beliefs are supported by philosophers(ies) or theorists. Essay written in a casual style with unclear usage of terminology and some illogical organization. Essay reflects little insight into the writer’s future as an educator. Some incorrect sentence structures, spelling, and/or grammar exhibited. More transitions are needed. Less than three pages. Weak professional language and/or contains a slang term.    

Essay is a rambling of ideas not documented or related to sound educational theory or philosophy. Several incorrect sentence structures, spellings, and/or grammar included.   Choppy and confusing verbiage that is difficult to follow. Less than two pages. Lacks professional language and contains slang terms.    

MoSTEP 1.2.11.1

Conceptual Framework: Knowledge 2D, Skills 2F, 3A; Dispositions 2D

In portfolio document, introductory sentence is included; Essay defines “technology operations” and “technology concepts.” Two or more examples of “technology operations” are identified and explained as related to the development of an electronic portfolio and assessment system..    

In portfolio document, introductory sentence is included. Essay defines “technology operations” and “technology concepts”. One example of “technology operations” are identified and explained as related to the development of an electronic portfolio and assessment system    

In portfolio document, introductory sentence is included. Essay weakly defines “technology operations” and “technology concepts.” examples of “technology operations” are identified and explained as related to the development of an electronic portfolio and assessment system

In portfolio document, missing artifact and its application to this indicator. No introductory sentence on electronic portfolio development, and several mistakes in sentence structure, grammar.

 

 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog Page 92

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog Page 92

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Analysis, Synthesis, and Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
-The artifact examined and analyzed the historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in education.   -Developed a comprehensive synthesis of evidenced-based theory and practice related to teachers and learners in the context of schools in our society.  -Presented and defended an educational philosophy reflecting 7 or more beliefs and more than 3 beliefs are supported by  evidenced-based theory and practice in the field of education. -The artifact analyzed the historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in education.   -Developed a synthesis of evidenced-based theory and practice related to teachers and learners in the context of schools in our society.  -Presented and defended an educational philosophy reflecting 6 or more beliefs and more than 3 beliefs are supported by  evidenced-based theory and practice in the field of education. -The artifact provided a discussion on the historical, philosophical, social, political, legal, and global issues in education.   -Provided an essay on evidenced-based theory and practice related to teachers and learners in the context of schools in our society.  -Presented and defended an educational philosophy reflecting 5 or fewer  beliefs and less than 3 beliefs are supported by  evidenced-based theory and practice in the field of education. -The artifact presents ideas that are not documented or related to sound educational theory or philosophy.  Contains misuse of terms, which do not reflect mastery of sound educational theory or philosophy. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
-The artifact applied both knowledge and understanding of the foundations of education, evidenced-based theory, and practice in education; personal examples or insights are included.  -The artifact or philosophy reflects exemplary insights of the writer's future within their chosen  professional field; students, who plan to teach, should write to their future as an educator. -The artifact moderately applied both knowledge and understanding of the foundations of education, evidenced-based theory, and practice in education; personal examples or insights are included  .-The artifact or philosophy reflects appropriate insights of the writer's future within their chosen  professional field. -The artifact minimally applied both knowledge and understanding of the foundations of education, evidenced-based theory, and practice in education; personal examples or insights are included.  -The artifact or philosophy reflects little insight into  the writer's future within their chosen  professional field. Artifact presents confusing verbiage that is difficult to follow and lacks professional language. 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
-The artifact provided evidence on the mastery of the demands of writing an educational philosophy.  A deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues is documented through the use of a professional language and style and efficacy in its organization.  The philosophy's thesis is thoroughly and persuasively argued; organization is logical, supporting arguments are linked and arranged persuasively.  Transitions create a unified philosophy.   -For education majors, the philosophy reflects a relationship to SPA standards, MoSTEP standards, and education portfolio standards.  -A minimum of 4 pages with no errors in written conventions (no slang) ; (correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling). -The artifact moderately provided evidence on the mastery of the demands of writing an educational philosophy.  A deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues is documented through the use of a professional language and style and efficacy in its organization.  The philosophy's thesis is thoroughly and persuasively argued; organization is logical, supporting arguments are linked and arranged persuasively.  Transitions create a unified philosophy.   - For education majors, the philosophy reflects a relationship to SPA standards, MoSTEP standards, and education portfolio standards.   -A minimum of 3 pages with no errors in written conventions (no slang) ; (correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling). -The artifact minimally artifact provided evidence on the mastery of the demands of writing an educational philosophy.  A deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues is documented through the use of a professional language and style and efficacy in its organization.  The philosophy's thesis is thoroughly and persuasively argued; organization is logical, supporting arguments are linked and arranged persuasively.  Transitions create a unified philosophy.   -For education majors, the philosophy reflects a relationship to SPA standards, MoSTEP standards, and education portfolio standards.   -Less than 3 pages with several errors in written conventions (slang, correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling). -Multiple incorrect sentence structures, spellings, and/or grammar included. Less than two pages with multiple errors in written conventions (slang, correct sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraph indention, date reference, word choice, typing, and spelling 
Competency Other Literacies (or Disciplinary Competency)                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
MoSTEP 1.2.4.1; 1.2.2.1, 1.2.2,2, 1.2.2.3, 1.2.9.1, 1.2.9.2, 1.2.9.3, Conceptual Framework knowledge 1A, 1D, 3F, Skills 2A, 3C, Dispositions 3B, 3D, 4C, 2B, 2A, 5A                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Accurate presentation of 7 or more beliefs.  More than three of the beliefs are supported by an appropriate, respected philosopher (ies) or theorists.  Personal examples or insights are included.  Essay demonstrates a deep understanding of educational terminology, ideas, and issues and written in a professional style and unique or enticing organization.  Essay reflects insights of the writer's future as an educator.  Correct sentence structure, punctuation, and grammar.   Transitions create unified essay.  Minimum four pages.  Professional language/ No slang terms. Accurate presentation of 6 beliefs.  Three of the beliefs are supported by an appropriate, respected  philosopher(ies) or theorists.  Essay written in a professional style, with clear and correct terminology, and with logical organization.  Essay demonstrates a grasp of educational terminology, ideas, and issues.  Essay reflects insights of the writer's future as an educator.  Correct sentence structure that utilizes transitions.  Minimum three pages.    Professional language/no slang terms. Presentation of 5 or fewer beliefs.  Less than three beliefs are supported by philosophers(ies) or theorists.  Essay written in a casual style with unclear usage of terminology and some illogical organization.  Essay reflects little insight into the writer's future as an educator.  Some incorrect sentence structures, spelling, and/or grammar exhibited.  More transitions are needed.  Less than three pages.  Weak professional language and/or contains a slang term. Essay is a rambling of ideas not documented or related to sound educational theory or philosophy.  Several incorrect sentence structures, spellings, and/or grammar included.   Choppy and confusing verbiage that is difficult to follow.  Less than two pages.  Lacks professional language and contains slang terms. 
Competency Other Literacies (or Disciplinary Competency)                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
MoSTEP 1.2.11.1 Conceptual Framework: Knowledge 2D, Skills 2F, 3A; Dispositions 2D                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
In portfolio document, introductory sentence is included; Essay defines “technology operations” and “technology concepts.” Two or more examples of “technology operations” are identified and explained as related to adding their philosophy of education to an electronic portfolio and assessment system.. In portfolio document, introductory sentence is included.  Essay defines “technology operations” and “technology concepts”.  One example of “technology operations” are identified and explained as related to adding their philosophy of education to an electronic portfolio and assessment system    









 
In portfolio document, introductory sentence is included. Essay weakly defines “technology operations” and “technology concepts.” examples of “technology operations” are identified and explained as related as related to adding their philosophy of education to an electronic portfolio and assessment system









 
In portfolio document, missing artifact and its application to this indicator.  No introductory sentence on electronic portfolio development, and several mistakes in sentence structure, grammar. 

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Last Updated:3/1/2010 10:25:51 PM