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CA 103 Public Speaking
Filkins, Ronald E.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CA 103 Public Speaking

Semester

F2GG 2009 MI

Faculty

Filkins, Ronald E.

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

MA Education
BA Liberal studies
AAS Human Resource Management

Daytime Phone

(701) 723-2574

Other Phone

(701) 340-7580

E-Mail

ronald.filkins@ park.edu

ref@srt.com

Semester Dates

F2GG 2009

Class Days

------S

Class Time

0800 - 1300

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Lucas, S. E.  (latest edition).  The art of public speaking.  Boston, MA:  McGraw-Hill.



Your tentative course syllabus is located here:  http://www.park.edu/syllabus/list.asp 

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

APA Citation Information: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/02/

APA Reference List Information: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/06/

Handouts for Public Speaking Students at Park: http://onlineacademics.org/CA103/Handouts/

Resources for Public Speaking Students at Park: http://onlineacademics.org/PS/

Writing, Citing, & Reference List Help from Park: http://www.park.edu/support/writing.asp

Outline Format

See your Lucas textbook. Many communication courses use APA style for citations and reference list. See Park information: http://www.park.edu/support/writing.asp

 

SPECIFIC PURPOSE:

INTRODUCTION

I. State an attention device in one complete sentence.

II. State your interest in this topic in one complete sentence.

III. State the behavioral objective of your speech in one complete sentence.

BODY

I. State the first main point in one complete sentence.

 A. In one complete sentence, provide supporting evidence and cite the source of the information in APA style (Author, Year).

 B. In one complete sentence, provide supporting evidence and cite the source of the information in APA style (Author, Year).

II. State the second main point in one complete sentence.

 A. In one complete sentence, provide supporting evidence and cite the source of the information in APA style (Author, Year).

 B. In one complete sentence, provide supporting evidence and cite the source of the information in APA style (Author, Year).

III. State the third main point in one complete sentence.

 A. In one complete sentence, provide supporting evidence and cite the source of the information in APA style (Author, Year).

 B. In one complete sentence, provide supporting evidence and cite the source of the information in APA style (Author, Year).

CONCLUSION

I. Summarize your speech in one complete sentence.

II. Tell the audience exactly what you want them to do in one complete sentence.

III. State a memorable device in one complete sentence.

REFERENCES

Provide 5 quality references in APA style, including at least two peer-reviewed quality from EBSCO or other quality data base. For information about how to use APA style, see http://www.park.edu/support/writing.asp

FIRST PAGE OF EACH REFERENCE (Copy or electronic format)

 

Outline and Speech Planning Documents


For a quality speech, you will want to provide advance planning document. You can demonstrate your preparation through the following items:
1. A typed speech outline, typically with 3-5 key ideas and supporting materials.
2. A reference list in American Psychological Association (APA) style that contains 4 or more sources. quality references, which reflects database--not Internet--research. You can access APA style information here
http://www.park.edu/support/writing.asp or http://www.apastyle.org/ or here http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_apa.html#Your%20Reference%20List , and other APA style elements. There are also online sources available to help you, such as http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_apa.html .
3. Hardcopy of the first page of each source used.

College-level quality research needs to use library databases. Please use scholarly databases http://www.park.edu/library/ (peer-reviewed and non peer-reviewed articles). Provide three sources to make sure you find multiple perspectives to support your speech. Print a copy of the html or PDF file of each source used--at least the first page--and attach the printout to your outline and reference list you submit to your professor at the time of your speech presentation. The Internet is NOT considered an appropriate source for college level research, so please do not use regular Internet websites as sources for your speeches. Use 4 or more quality references for all planned speeches, except the eulogy if you discuss a friend or family member. Here is a tutorial your professor prepared for conducting database research: http://onlineacademics.org/LibraryTutorial/

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
CA103 Public Speaking (GE): A development of the ability to speak clearly and express ideas effectively before an audience. Students plan, compose, and deliver various kinds of speeches and talks. Principles of effective rhetorical presentation are related to basic purposes and forms of public speech-communication. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:

Public speaking is a performance course designed to improve your public communication skills.  This means that students need to be actively engaged in both the speaking and listening process.  For onground sections, attendance is a high priority so you can participate in speaking to the class as a speaker and responding as an effective listener. 

 

Below are principles good instructional practice:

  1. Respects for diverse talents and ways of learning. 

  2. Student-faculty contact and interaction. 

  3. Student cooperative learning. 

  4. Active student learning. 

  5. Prompt feedback for student.

  6. Time on task for student. 

  7. High expectations for student.

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

 

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify the fundamental elements of the speech process.
  2. Demonstrate understanding of the ethical standards of effective speakers.
  3. Select and narrow a topic with a particular audience/situation in mind.
  4. Design a message with a particular audience/situation in mind.
  5. Demonstrate research skills necessary to the public speaking process.
  6. When appropriate, use audio-visual resources to help the audience understand the speech.
  7. Organize ideas in a purposeful, cohesive sequence which meets audience expectations and needs.
  8. Demonstrate accurate, clear and expressive use of language, nonverbal communication, and voice.
  9. Utilize language strategies for effective oral presentations.
  10. Present convincing arguments through reason, personal credibility, and emotion.
  11. Evaluate and choose evidence appropriate to the speaker, speech, and occasion.
  12. Effectively support ideas using evidence, sources, and sensory aids.
  13. Critically analyze student speeches for soundness of reasoning and evidence, and offer useful feedback to peers.
  14. Create and present an effective informative message to a target audience.
  15. Create and present an effective persuasive message to a target audience. (The final speech will measure EITHER #14 or #15).
  16. Critically analyze his/her speaking performances.
  17. Identify and use techniques for effective listening.


Core Assessment:

The core assessment for CA103-Public Speaking will be a Final Speech. This speech be a type of speech (persuasive or informative, forexample) already given by the student during the semester. For example, if a student has given informative, persuasive, and demonstration speeches during the semester, he must select one of those types of speeches to give for the final. The rationale is that a student increases his mastery of a type of speaking by giving that type of speech twice. The length of the speech will be determined by the instructor, and the topic by the instructor and/or the student.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Assignments guidelines will vary by instructor.

For example, your instructor require that you present a minimum of four speeches or a total of 25 minutes of presentations for a C or higher grade in the course (no matter what the student's point or percentage total).

Minor Assignments

Attendance, Discussion, Participation, Online Discussion, Speech Critiques/Feedback, Self-reflection Analysis Paper, Minor Assignments, Weekly Quiz, Tests, Final Exam

Major or Planned Speeches

Minimum of 3 speeches presented before the core assessment (final speech) as determined by the instructor.

 

These speeches need planning with full-sentence outlines or planning documents.

 

Major speeches are typically 5-15 minutes, with no more than 5 additional minutes for the setup and question-answer period.

  • Speech of Introduction Follow your instructor's specific requirements. 

Typically, in this speech you will introduce yourself or a classmate. Usually the speech is brief--such as 3-5 minutes--with no external sources or visual aid required. You may want to use an interesting quotation in the beginning or end of the speech (orally cite the source).

  • Minor Speeches. Follow your instructor's specific requirements. 

Many teachers require multiple brief speeches (e.g., narrative, impromptu, practice with a microphone, toast).

  • Informative. Follow your instructor's specific requirements. 

Typically, you will present a 5-15 minutes speech that informs the audience about a topic, process, idea, or event. Include a question and answer period. No more than 5 additional minutes for setup and question and answer period. 4 quality sources and a visual aid are required.

  • Special Speech. Follow your instructor's preferences and instructions.

Many teachers require a demonstration, eulogy, celebratory speech, or debate.

Typically, the demonstration speech is a 5-15 speech, for example, shows the audience how to make something or how to do something. If you are expert on the topic, no sources need be used in this speech, although they are always welcome. The focus should be on offering clear directions about some sort of process. Examples include the following: How to make lasagna, how to arrange flowers, how to decorate a dorm room, how to take a good picture. Visual aid required.

Typically, the eulogy is a 3-7 minute speech in which you celebrate the life of a lost loved one. No external sources and visual aids are needed, but are welcome.

  • Persuasive. Follow your instructor's preferences and instructions.

Typically in a 5-15 minute speech, you will use ethical, emotional, and logical appeals and evidence to motivate the audience to action on a topic of interest. Include a behavioral objective of what you want the audience to think and do at the end of the speech. Orally cite and reference four high-quality sources. Advance complete sentence outline or planning documents required. A maximum of an additional 5 minutes can be used for set-up and a question and answer period.

  • Core Assessment. Follow your instructor's preferences and instructions. Required Final Speech (typically persuasive).

Typically, you will present a 5-15 minute persuasive speech, which cites and references 5 high-quality sources.

Park University has signed an agreement to support positive steps toward environmental protection and conservation. Your instructor may select a theme--such as "the environment"--where all student speeches work together as a motivational whole.

For all sections, a minimum of 70% of the final course grade is based on speech presentations.

Grading:

90-100% A

80-89.99% B

70-79.99% C

60-60.99% D

0-59.99% F

 

Speeches & speech outlines or planning documents:  50%

Final Speech (Core Assessment):  20%
Other Assignments:  30%

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Be On-time


Because of the unique performance nature of this course, students need to be prepared to present speeches when scheduled.  Obviously, in the real world, if a person fails to show to a public speaking situation, the opportunity is gone.  Faculty may prohibit make-up speeches, particularly regarding the final speech (core assessment).

Please avoid walking in late and interrupting a student speaker.

Faculty may use one or more of these policies:
  • No late work accepted.
  • No late work accepted unless the student has worked out arrangements in advance of the due date.
  • Automatic point or percentage deduction.
  • A physician's excuse for the absence required.
  • An additional assignment required in addition to the original late assignment.
  • An instructor-specific solution.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Guidelines for Student Conduct and Expectations


  • Be on time and engaged in the entire class meeting.   You cannot make up in-class participation assignments because they are just that--in class participation where you learn collaboratively.  

  • Contribute to the learning community consistently throughout the course. Students need to turn off cell phones and similar devices during presentations.  Park University expects instructors to take and report attendance each week.

  • Turn in your assignments on time.  Some instructors do not accept makeup work.  Plan to submit written assignments as a hardcopy at the beginning of the class meeting.  Speeches are due when your instructor calls on you. Please do NOT email assignments to your instructor unless he or she tells you to do so.

  • No animals in the classroom please. 

  • Use appropriate nonverbals for presentation.  Competent communicators are careful about the messages of their appearance and vocal qualities as nonverbal communication.  Speak loudly and clearly so that you can be heard by everyone, including an audience member who has a hearing loss.   Remember, you must be heard to be understood.  Convey a passion or enthusiasm for your topic and message via your voice.  Research says that more formal clothing and appearance increases a speaker's credibility.  At the minimum, professionalism suggests no hats, no pajamas, no rubbery flip-flops, no shorts, no bare midriff/chest, and no outdoor jackets.  If your appearance distracts or creates a weak impression with the audience, you will lose effectiveness.   For a skilled approach, look and sound like a professional.

  • Show Respect.  Respect is a reciprocal relationship.  Be sensitive and adaptive toward your audience. 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Tentative Schedule

8 Weeks

Topic

Speech Assignments Due

Follow your instructor's specific schedule in the course syllabus located here: http://www.park.edu/syllabus/list.aspx

Lucas Reading Assignment

1

Introduction

 

Brief speeches

Speech 1 outline or planning document due

Chapter 1: Speaking in Public
Chapter 2: Ethics and Public Speaking
Chapter 3: Listening
Appendix: Giving Your First Speech

2

Fundamentals of Public Speaking

Present Speech 1

Speech 2 typed outline or planning document due

Present brief speeches as time allows.

Chapter 4: Selecting a Topic and Purpose
Chapter 5: Analyzing the Audience
Chapter 6: Gathering Materials
Chapter 7: Supporting Your Ideas

3

Organizing and Presenting Speeches

Present Speech 2

Speech 3 typed outline or planning document due

Present brief speeches as time allows.

Chapter 8: Organizing the Body of the Speech
Chapter 9: Beginning and Ending the Speech
Chapter 10: Outlining the Speech

Chapter 11: Using Language
Chapter 12: Delivery

4

Informative Speeches

Midterm test/speech over readings to date.

Present brief speeches as time allows.

Chapter 13: Visual Aids
Appendix: Using PowerPoint
Chapter 14: Speaking to Inform

5

Persuasive Speaking

Present Speech 3

Speech 4 typed outline or planning document due

Present brief speeches as time allows.

 

Chapter 15: Speaking to Persuade
Chapter 16: Methods of Persuasion

6

Special Occasions and/or

Group Presentations

Present Speech 4

Final Speech typed outline or planning document due

Present brief speeches as time allows.

Chapter 17: Speaking on Special Occasions
Chapter 18: Speaking in Small Groups

7

Speech Analysis and Skill Building

Present Final Speech

Present brief speeches as time allows.

Appendix: Speeches for Analysis and Discussion

8

Course Closure & Final Exam

Final Speech

 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2008-2009 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87
Students need to orally cite the sources of information during their speeches.  In addition, outlines and planning documents need all sources to be cited in the body of the speech and a reference list included at the end.

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog Page 92

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:


   
       
           
       
   

           


           
           Example Brief Speaking Assignments


           



Example Brief
Speaking Assignments





Impromptu Speech on Assigned Topic


Impromptu Speech about the World. Let's begin by thinking about other places in
the world. Write down the names of ten of the largest cities in the world. What
did you name? Answer Why are there different answers? How is that
difference important to us as analytical speakers and listeners? I'll project a
map of the world on the board.


Group Presentation (Panel)


Sunglasses Speech

We are wearing sunglasses for two reasons. First, learning speakers often find
it easier to talk when they don't have or feel direct eye contact. Second, I
want you to think about the importance of eye contact. We'll talk about how you
feel talking and listening with sunglasses on after the speeches are over.

Travel Speech

Give an impromptu speech about a place in the world--where you are from, a
place you have traveled, or a place you want to visit--and mark an x on the world map.

Radio Speech

Write a statement in which you strongly believe. Pretend you are calling in
to a radio talk show and make your statement. Give your speech from your speech.
Listeners will not look at you because we are pretending this is radio. Focus on
clear voice and language.

Ethics Debate

In communication, the speaker must always be completely honest.

Prepare to argue either side of the idea, definition, or theory. What are three
argument(s) in favor or support of this idea and three argument(s)) against or
in disagreement of this idea. Give one example or anecdote from your personal
experience, for each side of the argument.

Keys Impromptu Speech

Take out your keys. Tell us about yourself by relating to something on your
keys.

Listener/Speaker Responsibility Debate

Good listeners help create good speakers.

versus

Good listeners are caused by talented speakers.

Pocket or Purse Speech

Pull out at least three items from your wallet (book bag, purse). Discuss
what they tell about you. What can you learn from the items about the people who
will be in your audience?

Content versus Delivery Debate

Good speech content is meaningless without effective delivery (nonverbal
presentation through voice, body, movement, and more).

versus

Good speech presentation is meaningless without effective content (logic,
interest devices, high quality sources).

Employment Interview


Tell a Story (Narrative)

Organization Debate!

The best speech is one that is clearly organized in a sequential
organizational pattern.

versus

The best speech is one that is simply organized as a story from the heart.
 

Content-free Speech


Using numbers, convey one of the following emotions: love, fear, surprise,
happiness, anger, excitement, passion, friendliness, confidence. Without
language, you will need to use your voice, facial expression, and other
nonverbal communication.




Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The speech demonstrates the student's ability to synthesize information from 4+ sources. The speech demonstrates the  student's ability to synthesize information from 2-3 sources. The speech demonstrates the  student's ability to synthesize information from 1 source. No sources are used. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The speech demonstrates the  student's ability to formulate and use creative, logical main points and convincing arguments. The speech demonstrates the student's ability to formulate and use logical main points and arguments. The speech demonstrates the  student's ability either to formulate and use vague or inappropriate main points or arguments. No coherent main points or arguments are present. 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The speech demonstrates the  student's ability to evaluate and use unique, original materials and sources. The speech demonstrates the  student's ability to evaluate and use appropriate materials and sources. The speech demonstrates the  student's ability to evaluate and use marginally appropriate or unclear materials and sources. Inappropriate materials and sources are used; or, no materials or sources are used. 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
(In this area, terminology is interpreted as using vocabulary and grammar.) The speech demonstrates the student's ability to effectively use advanced, professional-level vocabulary and grammar. (In this area, terminology is interpreted as using vocabulary and grammar.) The final speech demonstrates the student's ability to use appropriate vocabulary and grammar. (In this area, terminology is interpreted as using vocabulary and grammar.) The final speech demonstrates the student's ability to use vocabulary and grammar on a rudimentary level. (In this area, terminology is interpreted as using vocabulary and grammar.) Grammar and vocabulary are poorly used and/or inappropriate. 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
(In this area, one of the most important concepts mastered by students is organization). The speech demonstrates the student's ability to organize content into seamless, easy-to-follow introduction, body, and conclusion. (In this area, one of the most important concepts mastered by students is organization). The speech demonstrates the student's ability to organize content into clear introduction, body, and conclusion. (In this area, one of the most important concepts mastered by students is organization). The speech demonstrates the student's ability to organize content into rudimentary (but difficult to follow) introduction, body, and conclusion. (In this area, one of the most important concepts mastered by students is organization). No clear introduction, body, and conclusion are present. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The speech demonstrates the  student's to effectively apply principles of good public speaking, including consistent eye contact with all audience members and having no distractors (un, uh, like). The speech demonstrates the  student's to effectively apply principles of good public speaking, including consistent eye contact and using few distractors (un, uh, like). The speech demonstrates the student's to sporadically apply principles of good public speaking. Eye contact is inconsistent, and many distractors (un, uh, like) are present. Eye contact is non-existent, and distractors (un, uh, like) are common. 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The speech demonstrates the student's ability to deliver audience-appropriate content professionally. Organization is clear and clever, and delivery is energetic and engages audience. The speech demonstrates the student's ability to deliver audience-appropriate content. Organization is clear, and delivery engages audience. The speech usually demonstrates the student's ability to deliver audience-appropriate content. Organization is usually clear, and delivery sometimes engages the audience. Content is not audience appropriate. Speech is either disorganized, and/or the delivery leaves audience bored, confused, or both. 

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Last Updated:10/2/2009 6:12:19 AM