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EDC 355 Social&Emotional Learning inEarly Childhood
Estes, Judith Lynn


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

EDC 355 Social&Emotional Learning inEarly Childhood

Semester

S6J 2010 DN

Faculty

Estes, Judith Lynn

Title

Assistant Professor of Education

Degrees/Certificates

B.S. Elementary Education
MS Psychology, Mental Health Services; MS Special Education
PhD Behavioral Psychology

Office Location

Copley 324

Office Hours

T, TH 8:00-9:30, 11:00-1:00; T DN 4:30-5:30

Daytime Phone

816-935-3375

Other Phone

816-935-3375

E-Mail

jestes@park.edu

Semester Dates

January 11th-May 7th 2010

Class Days

--T----

Class Time

5:30 - 8:00 PM

Prerequisites

Admittance to School for Education. EDC 220, EDC222. Must co-enroll in EDC 360b or EDC 361b or permission from instructor

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Gartrell, D. (2004). The power of guidance: Teaching social emotional skills in early childhood classrooms.  Clifton Park, NY: Thompson Delmar Learning. (ISBN 1-4018-4856-7)

Kaiser, B., and Rasminsky, J. (2007). Challenging behavior in young children: Understanding, preventing, and responding effectively. Boston: Pearson Allyn and Bacon. (ISBN 0-205-49333-5)

Bredekamp  S. & Copple, C. (2007). Developmentally Appropriate Practice. Washington, D.C. National Association for the Education of Young Children.
 

    PORTFOLIO Requirement

All Park University teacher candidates seeking certification and licensure must purchase Foliotek, the School for Education’s electronic portfolio system. As purchasing and accessing Foliotek is a multi-step process, please follow these instructions: 

1.      Decide the Contract Period and fee for which you will be paying. Minimally, you must purchase a contract which extends to the year you expect to graduate, however some students purchase a contract extending one year beyond graduation. 

 Contract Period    

 Contract Fee

Per Student (Prepaid)

Cost Breakdown

Per Student, Per Year

 1 year

 $30.00

$30.00

 2 years

 $59.00

$29.50

 3 years

 $87.00

$29.00

 4 years

 $112.00

$28.00

 5 years

$120.00

$24.00

6 years

$125.00

$20.83

2.      Send an email to Carol Williams (carol.williams@park.edu) with the following information:

1.      Your Name

2.      The Contract Period you wish to purchase

3.      Your student identification number

3.      Within a few days, you will receive from Foliotek an email with online purchasing information. Upon receipt of this email, purchase your Foliotek contract.

4.      Upon receipt of your payment, you will receive your login information. You must then send a final email to Carol Williams (carol.williams@park.edu), requesting she provide your current education professors and a academic advisor (list them) access to view your portfolio. It is imperative you complete this final step!!

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:
Pertinent articles may be provided to students as well as writings from the following resources:

DeVries, R. & Zan, B. (1994). Moral classrooms, Moral children” creating a constructivist atmosphere in early education. NY: Teacher’s College Press. (ISBN: 0-8077-3341-5)

Goleman, D. (1995). Emotional intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ. NY: Bantam Books. (ISBN 0-553-37506-7)

Howes, C. & Ritchie, S. (2002). A matter of trust: connecting teachers and learners in the early childhood classroom. NY: Teacher’s College Press.

Hyson, M. (2004). The emotional development of young children: building an emotion-centered curriculum. NY: Teacher’s College Press.

Kemple K. M. (2004). Let’s be friends: Peer competence and social inclusion in early childhood programs. NY: Teacher’s College Press.

Missouri Pre-K social and emotional development standards and approaches to learning, Teacher’s guide and Parent handbook. (2002). Access @ www.dese.state.mo.us
 

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
EDC355 Social and Emotional Learning in Early Childhood: This course will examine the theories that support the problem solving approach to guiding young childrens behavior in the early childhood classroom. The adult role in developing relationships of mutual trust and respect and helping young children see themselves as a member of a learning community will be emphasized. Developmentally appropriate strategies, including preventive strategies, will be explored. Students will observe and analyze guidance and classroom management practices in different early childhood settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Education or the Early Childhood Education and Leadership Practicum.3:0:3.

Educational Philosophy:
           The ability of young children to manage their emotions and behaviors and to make meaningful friendships is an important prerequisite for school readiness and academic success. Socially competent children are also more academically successful and poor social skills are a strong predictor of academic failure.Parents and teachers need to be aware of the principles of development in order to guide children appropriately. The process of guidance begins with attempts to baby-proof the environment, such as arranging the nursery in anticipation of the arrival of the infant. During the infant-toddler stage, adults may view their acts of altering the child's physical environment as their responsibility, not connecting such actions to the development of a discipline plan. In fact, the adults are beginning to develop a positive atmosphere so that the child has a healthy environment in which to grow. The problem-solving approach encourages “kids to do what kids do” as they learn to take responsibility for their words and actions. Through real-life examples, sample dialogues, and numerous photographs and posters, the problem-solving approach is explained, stressing environment first, then progressing to listening skills, negotiating, conflict resolution, and setting limits.

            Compelling evidence from developmental research has revealed that early experiences and relationships at home and school set the stage for how a child learns self-regulation skills, as well as the ability to manage emotions, take the perspective of others, and develop close relationships (National Research Council and Institutes of Medicine, 2000). Evidence also exists that children's social and emotional competence (marked by more cooperation and less aggressive behavior) is integrally linked to their cognitive and academic competencies manifested by their ability to learn and be successful at school (Raver & Knitzer, 2002). Furthermore, evidence suggests that without intervention, emotional and behavioral problems in young children (e.g., aggression, antisocial behavior patterns) may be less amenable to intervention after age 8 (Eron, 1990), resulting in an escalation of academic problems and antisocial behavior and eventual school drop out in later years (Snyder, 2001; Tremblay, Mass, Pagani, & Vitaro, 1996).

         Overall, national survey data have suggested that the prevalence of problem behaviors in young children is about 10% and may be as high as 25% for children of low-income families (Webster-Stratton & Hammond, 1998). In fact, preschool teachers report that child disruptive behavior problems are the most important challenges they face. These findings have implications for the kinds of support teachers need, as well as for preventive intervention strategies for parents and teachers targeted at strengthening social and emotional competence in young children.

            A socially and emotionally healthy, school-ready child is confident and friendly, has good peer relationships, tackles and persists at challenging tasks, has good language development, can communicate well, listens to instructions, and is attentive (National Research Council and Institutes of Medicine, 2000). The ability to form and maintain positive friendships involves a complex interplay of feelings, thoughts, and behaviors. Conversing with other children, solving interpersonal problems, entering into play with groups of peers, and regulating emotional responses to frustrating experiences are skills that contribute to success in making friends (Crick & Dodge, 1994). Socially competent children fairly easily learn strategies for interacting comfortably and positively with others during their everyday experiences at home and at school. Children with a more difficult temperament (e.g., hyperactivity, impulsivity, inattention) and children from disadvantaged family backgrounds of abuse and conflict may have particular difficulty with conflict management, social skills, emotional regulation, and making friends. These children may require more intensive and explicit training to learn the skills needed to be successful in their peer group.

            Teaching children skills, such as how to play with other children, recognize and express feelings, be friendly and talk to peers, exercise self-control, and negotiate conflict situations, may result in fewer aggressive responses, more positive friendships, inclusion with prosocial peer groups, and increased likelihood of success in school. Because development of these skills is not automatic, particularly for children such as those mentioned earlier, intentional teaching is needed (Bredekamp & Copple, 1997).

 

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Apply knowledge of child growth, development and learning to teaching
  2. Examine and evaluate strategies that help children become responsible decision-makers.
  3. Appraise strategies to facilitate children's skills in communication and interpersonal relationships, including problem solving and negotiation.
  4. Examine strategies for building a sense of community and friendship inclusive of all children.
  5. Evaluate strategies for responding effectively to children with challenging behaviors.
  6. Analyze the role of culture in creating relationships.
  7. Explain and analyze strategies for collaborating with families to support parents in guiding the behavior of their child.
  8. Formulate an appropriate philosophy of early childhood education as a basis for making professions decisions.


Core Assessment:
Classroom Observations with Analysis and Reflection

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
1. Participation in class discussion boards 1/26-2/1 and 2/2/-2/8 Total Points 80  

Evidence of reading assignments and application of ideas in class discussion board and responses to peers. (10 pts for each discussion question answer and 2. 5 points for each of two peer responses)

2. Observations (NAEYC Standards: 1c, 4a, and 4b). Total Points: 105

            Part A. Complete a Functional Assessment on the Whole Class (15 pts)

Part B. Complete a Functional Assessment of Student A Behavior (15 pts).

Part C. Complete 3  Functional Assessments of Student B Behavior and background information (55pts)

Part D. In-class Activity (20 pts)

3. Interviews (NAEYC Standards 1c, 4a, 4b) Total Points: 60

a.       Conduct an interview with your mentor teacher. Ask the following questions: 1) How do you define challenging behavior? 2) When a teacher/center has a child with challenging behaviors enrolled, what kind of questions should the teacher ask herself to support the child’s social and emotional development? 3) When working with children with challenging behaviors in your classroom what has helped you most? 4) Describe your strategies/ guidelines for working with the family of a child with challenging behavior. 5) Review the philosophy statement of the school or program. What does it say in relation to guidance and motivation? (20 pts)

b.      Conduct an interview with a family of a child enrolled in your practicum (or observation) classroom. Consider the following questions to ask the family: 1) what does your center/teacher do to make you and your child feel welcomed and comfortable? 2) How does your center keep you informed of happenings in the center and the classroom? 3) How does the teacher support your child rearing beliefs and wishes? 4) What kind of information, activities, and communication would like for the teacher/center to share with you? These questions will be further refined in class and personalized. Submit interview guide and answers. (20 pts)

c.       Reflection. At the conclusion of your account of the interviews, reflect on your learnings. What guidance or motivation strategies would be useful and related to the school/program philosophy (refer to the literature). What are you noticing that seems important for your teaching? How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be? What readings are helping you understand the issues? Why might your learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company? How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent? How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions?  (20 pts)

4. Classroom Management Plan (NAEYC 1c, 4a, 4b, 5d) Total Points 150

Based upon your observations, readings and interviews develop a classroom management plan. Please see attached guideline. Each of the six sections is worth 20 pts and an additional 30 points when you revise and submit and completed plan. (Refer to CORE ASSESSMENT RUBRIC)

5. Peer review of Philosophy statement Total 10 points

6. Philosophy Statement. (NAEYC Standards 1c, 4a, 4b, 5d) Total Points 30

Synthesize your learnings for the semester by writing a one to two page letter to your future employer explaining your philosophy of guidance. Be sure to include reference to the theories, writers, observations, events, knowledge, and values that influence your thinking.

7. Portfolio Essay. Total Points 30

            In preparation for your culminating portfolio, write the first draft of the essay addressing the professional standards relevant to your degree program [MO-STEP1.2.6 (for those candidates seeking early childhood teaching certification)      NAEYC Standards 1c, 4a, 4b (for those candidates who are in teaching non-certification program) 

Grading:
 

Points Each
Total Points
%
Class discussion boards
40
80
17%
Observations
 
105
23%
Interviews
 
60
13%
Classroom management plan
 
150
33%
Peer review of philosophy
 
10
2%
Philosophy
 
30
6%
Essay
 
30
6%
TOTAL
 
465
100%

FINAL GRADE
A=418-465
B=372-417
C=325-371
D=279-324
F=278 and below

Late Submission of Course Materials:
As a teacher you will be expected to meet the responsibility of deadlines. Such is also the case for teacher candidates. Teacher candidates must follow the criteria outlined and abide by the due dates for each project. Demonstrate your ability to be responsible by adhering to assignment due dates. As a reminder, all assignments must be submitted through e-companion. Hard copies will not be accepted. Should you not meet the assignment deadlines, your late submission total points will be deducted by 10%.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Reading/Course Participation

Candidates are required to read the textbook chapters in order to participate in class discussions.  Small group work includes dialogue and problem solving throughout the semester. Candidates must enter each discussion board in a timely manner as the interaction among peers and faculty is essential to the learning process in this class. If candidates enter too late, then peers will not have the opportunity to engage in dialogue with one another and learning is halted. As a result, individual candidates may receive partial points or not points for class participation and interaction. The class projects are based on contents covered in the text and class dialogue.

 Writing Assignments 

Students may not submit assignments for this class that have been submitted to meet requirements of other classes. Scoring guides that include format for written assignments are provided for the course project packet. Teacher candidates should attend the writing center to ensure that papers do not bear any technical writing and typological errors. (http://www.park.edu/support/writing.asp)  Candidates must cite references using APA style within the contents of the paper. Candidates should write papers in order to explain all information (assume that the reader does not understand the information presented). This form of writing will enable the students to explain their ideas and understanding of content to the professor. Furthermore, this form will better enable candidates to explain ideas to family members of children with whom they will work in the future. All written papers should be saved for the purpose of revision.  Candidates are allowed to make one revision for each written project if the grade is less than ninety percent and submitted on time. The due date for the revised papers is one week after they have been returned to students.

Visiting Programs

When visiting early childhood programs for observations or when conducting interviews, it is essential that candidates always remember that they are representatives of Park University. Professional dress and behaviors are required during all observations. Unprofessional behavior will be evidenced in final grade.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
See attachments.

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog Page 92

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog Page 92

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:
 

Core Learning Outcomes



       
  1. Applies knowledge of child growth, development and learning to teaching


MoSTEP 1.2.2 Understands how students learn and develop, and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal development of all students.


SPAs EC Competencies 2.3 Uses developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments, materials,  resources, and activities appropriate to various developmental levels of all           children birth through age eight.


NAEYC 1c: Uses developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments.



       
  1. Examines and evaluates strategies that help children become responsible decision-makers.


MoSTEP 1.2.6 Uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.


SPAs EC Competencies 6.9 Demonstrates ability to develop a well-organized and managed classroom environment that fosters positive social interaction and a  developing understanding of democratic decision-making


NAEYC 4a: Knows, understands, and uses positive relationships and supportive interactions. 4b: Knows, understands, and uses effective approaches, strategies, and tools for early education.



       
  1. Appraises strategies to facilitate children's skills in communication and interpersonal relationships, including problem solving and negotiation.


MoSTEP 1.2.5 Uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students' development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.

1.2.6 Uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.


SPAs EC Competencies 6.4 Facilitates children’s skills in communication, inquiry, logical and critical thinking, problem-solving, creative expressions, and interpersonal relations.


NAEYC 4a: Knows, understands, and uses positive relationships and supportive interactions. 4b: Knows, understands, and uses effective approaches, strategies, and tools for early education.



       
  1. Examines strategies for building a sense of community and friendship inclusive of all children.


MoSTEP 1.2.6 Uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.


SPAs EC Competencies 6.6 Understands and applies instructional and guidance procedures for integrating children of all cultures and backgrounds, with and without disabilities. 6.7 Demonstrates a varied repertoire of research-based guidance approaches to meet children’s individual needs in developing social skills, including self-regulation and respect for others


NAEYC 4a: Knows, understands, and uses positive relationships and supportive interactions. 4b: Knows, understands, and uses effective approaches, strategies, and tools for early education.



       
  1. Evaluates strategies for responding effectively to children with challenging behaviors.


MoSTEP 1.2.6 Uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.


SPAs EC Competencies 6.6 Understands and applies instructional and guidance procedures for integrating children of all cultures and backgrounds, with and    without disabilities. 6.7 Demonstrates a varied repertoire of research-based guidance approaches to meet children’s individual needs in developing social skills, including self-regulation and respect for others


6.8 Possesses knowledge of motivational theories and holds high expectations for all children.


NAEYC 4a: Knows, understands, and uses positive relationships and supportive interactions.



       
  1. Analyzes the role of culture in creating relationships.


MoSTEP

1.2.3 Understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.

1.2.7.4 Uses a variety of media communication tools.


SPAs EC Competencies 5.1 Uses, adapts, and assesses research-based literacy activities and teaching methods that help children strengthen cultural identity, explore their environments, and develop the conceptual, experiential, and language foundations for learning to read, write, and converse using vocabulary that reflects their growing knowledge of the world around


NAEYC 1c: Uses developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments.



       
  1. Explain and analyze strategies for collaborating with families to support parents in guiding the behavior of their child.


MoSTEP

1.2.6 The pre-service teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

1.2.10 The pre-service teacher fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents, and educational partners in the larger community to support student learning and well-being.


SPAs EC Competencies 3.4 articulates theory and research to support the concepts that families are young children’s primary teachers and that family and community involvement are critical to successful early learning.


            6.7 Demonstrates a varied repertoire of research-based guidance approaches to meet children’s individual needs in developing social skills, including self-regulation and respect for others.


NAEYC 2c: Involves families and communities in their children’s development and learning.


4a: Knows, understands, and uses positive relationships and supportive interactions.


 



       
  1. Formulate an appropriate philosophy of early childhood education as a basis for making professions decisions.


MoSTEP 1.2.9 The pre-service teacher is a reflective practitioner who applies the ethical practices of the profession and continually assesses the effects of his/her choices and actions on others. This reflective practitioner actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally and utilizes the assessment and professional growth to generate more learning for more students.


SPAs EC Competencies 1.4 Articulates and applies educationally sound philosophy (i.e. a coherent set of beliefs, concepts, and attitudes) of early childhood education as a basis for making professional decisions.


NAEYC 5d: Engaging in informed advocacy for children and the profession.


Core Assessment:


Based upon observations, readings and interviews candidates will develop a classroom management plan/child guidance plan. Candidates will describe how to organize classroom and or environment to foster positive growth in the early childhood setting. Candidates should synthesize course assignments in order to develop their own beliefs and ideas in development of the plan. The classroom management/child guidance plan must include references to theories and readings.


Attachments:
Course calendar

Classroom Mangement Plan Outline

Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1,2,3,4,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Analysis provides an in-depth discussion of  the ways 1) the physical environment, 2) active listening, 3) negotiations, 4) effective setting of limits and 5) use of affirmations support the social and emotional learning of the child.  

Many specific examples are explained from the observational notes (at least two for each of the five parts of the question) (NAEYC Standard 4a).  



Readings from multiple sources are used to help analyze your observation (Ayers, Gartrell, Paley, and journal articles). (NAEYC Standard 5d) 
Examples are referenced from the observational notes (at least one for each of the five parts of the question) (NAEYC Standard 4a).  



Reading from one source is used to help analyze your observation. (NAEYC Standard 5d) 
Few if any examples are used from the observational notes (NAEYC Standard 4a).  

Readings are rarely or inappropriately used to  analyze the observation. (NAEYC Standard 5d) 
No evidence. 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1,2,3,4,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Responses are well-developed with explanations of three or more relevant examples from your fieldwork.



How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?  (NAEYC Standard 5d)

•How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent? (NAEYC Standard 4a) 
Responses address questions with brief reference to two relevant examples from your fieldwork.

•How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?  (NAEYC Standard 5d)

•How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent? (NAEYC Standard 4a) 
Responses are brief and rely on personal opinion.

•How are these learnings helping you develop a vision of the teacher you want to be?  (NAEYC Standard 5d)

•How are your learnings helping you envision children as capable and competent? (NAEYC Standard 4a) 
No evidence of addressing the required questions. 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
1,2,3,4,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Response is well-developed with explanations of two or more relevant examples from your readings.

•How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions? (NAEYC Standard 5d) 
Response addresses question with brief reference to an example from your readings.

•How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions? (NAEYC Standard 5d) 
Response is brief.  Relies on personal opinion.

How are you coming to appreciate the values that underlie teaching decisions? (NAEYC Standard 5d) 
No evidence. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1,2,3,4,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Response is well-developed with explanations of three or more relevant examples from your fieldwork or reading.

•Why might these learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company?  (NAEYC Standard 5d) 
Response addresses question. Two relevant examples from your fieldwork or reading are briefly referenced.

•Why might these learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company?  (NAEYC Standard 5d) 
Response is minimal.  Relies on personal opinion.

•Why might these learnings be important for the year children will spend in your company?  (NAEYC Standard 5d) 
No evidence. 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Basic concepts of a guidance approach to classroom management are explained and differentiated from other approaches.  (NAEYC 4a) Basic concepts of a guidance approach to classroom management are referenced. (NAEYC 4a) Basic concepts of a guidance approach to classroom management are not referenced. (NAEYC 4a) No evidence. 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Careful attention to spelling and grammar.



Well-organized paragraphs help the reader follow your thinking. 
Several minor errors in grammar and spelling (3-5).





 
Substantial errors in grammar and spelling (more than 5).

Construction of paragraphs is confusing.



 
No evidence. 
First Disciplinary Competency                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Outcomes
Examine and evaluate strategies that help children become responsible decision-makers. (MoSTEP  1.2.6 EC 6.9 NAEYC 4a, 4b)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Assignment explains the value of children as decision-makers, both in the curriculum and in the classroom as a community of learners with at least four relevant examples from your readings or observations.  (NAEYC 4a, 4b) Assignment briefly references the value of children as decision-makers, both in the curriculum and in the classroom as a community of learners with at least three relevant examples from your readings or observations.  (NAEYC 4a, 4b) Assignment provides little if any reference to the value of children as decision-makers, both in the curriculum and in the classroom as a community of learners with few relevant examples from readings or observations (two or less). (NAEYC 4a, 4b) 





No evidence.

 
Second Disciplinary Competency                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
Examine and evaluate strategies to facilitate children's skills in communication and interpersonal relationships, including problem solving and negotiation. (MoSTEP  1.2.5, 1.2.6 EC 6.4 NAEYC Standards 4a, 4b)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Assignment clearly explains the contributions of a guidance approach to the child's development of these essential skills.  Examples from the field observations are used to provide a strong understanding of the value of each skill for the child as a learner (two or more relevant examples for each of the four skills identified in the competency).  (NAEYC 4a, 4b) Assignment references the contributions of a guidance approach to the child's development of these essential skills.  Several examples from the field observations are provided (at least one  relevant example for each of the four skills). (NAEYC 4a, 4b) Assignment provides little if any reference to the contributions of a guidance approach to the child's development of these four essential skills.  No relevant examples are provided from the field observations are provided. (NAEYC 4a, 4b) 





No evidence.

 

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Last Updated:1/11/2010 3:45:00 PM