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CS 219 Programming Fundamentals
Whale, Robert



Park University
SEMESTER/TERM COURSE BEING TAUGHT:
Summer 1 -- 2005
NAME OF FACULTY MEMBER:
Bob Whale
TITLE OF FACULTY MEMBER:
Adjunct Faculty Member
FACULTY OFFICE LOCATION:
I work primarily from my home.
FACULTY OFFICE HOURS:
By appointment.
FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONE NUMBER:
801-592-4838
FACULTY PARK EMAIL ADDRESS:
Robert.Whale@pirate.park.edu
OTHER FACULTY EMAIL ADDRESS:
rcwhale@yahoo.com
DATES OF THE SEMESTER/TERM:
June 10 - August 10, 2005
CLASS SESSIONS DAYS:
Fridays


CLASS SESSION TIME:
4:30 - 9:30 p.m.
PREREQUISITE(S):
CS151 -- Introduction to Programming
CREDIT HOURS:
3.0
MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.
VISION STATEMENT

Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course continues the development of the programming and problem solving skills introduced in CS 151. Programming concepts will be put into practice by using Java for programming projects. Students will learn about object-oriented programming and two of its key components - inheritance and polymorphism. Additionally, students will learn about these topics: graphical user interface components, event-driven programming, exception handling, files. Prerequisites: Any math course equal or greater than MA131, a grade of "C" or better in CS151. Suggested prerequisite: CS140 3:0:3

FACULTY’S EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY:
The instructor’s educational philosophy is one of interactive participation based on lectures, readings, quizzes, dialogues, examinations, internet, videos, web sites and writings. The instructor will engage each learner in what is referred to as disputatious learning to encourage the lively exploration of ideas, issues, and contradictions.



COURSE OBJECTIVES:
• Explain object-oriented programming concepts (this should be a quick review since OOP concepts are covered in CS 151) - classes, instance variables, instance methods, constructors
• Explain advanced object-oriented programming concepts - inheritance, polymorphism
• Demonstrate creativity and problem-solving skills.
• Use the JBuilder integrated development environment to enter, run, and debug Java programs.
• Debug and test Java programs.
• Write Java programs that use proper style and documentation.
• Demonstrate proper use of the object-oriented principle of inheritance.
• Given a problem description, the student should be able to decide on appropriate classes in a class hierarchy tree.
• Demonstrate proper use of the object-oriented principle of composition.
• Given a description that involves two classes, the student should be able to decide on whether composition or inheritance is more appropriate.
• Write Java programs that use:
• One-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays
• Object-oriented programming concepts - inheritance, polymorphism
• Exception handling
• File I/O
• GUI programming - event-driven programming, layout managers, swing objects

COURSE TEXTBOOK(S):
JAVA An Introduction to Problem Solving & Programming by Walter Savitch -- Fourth Edition -- Prentice Hall Publisher ISBN-0-13-149202-0

ACADEMIC HONESTY: “Academic Honesty is required of all members of a learning community. Hence, Park will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers or other course assignments. Students who engage in such dishonesty may be given failing grades or expelled from Park.”

PLAGIARISM: Plagiarism—the appropriation or imitation of the language or ideas of another person and presenting them as one’s original work—sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance. Students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their instructors.”



ATTENDANCE POLICY: Instructors are required to keep attendance records and report absences. The instructor may excuse absences for cogent reasons, but missed work must be made up within the term of enrollment. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of “F”. An Incomplete will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance (TA) or Veterans Administration (VA) educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student. Reports of F grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for students receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS:
Assignments are due each Tuesday on a weekly basis. Late work will be accepted but is penalized 20% for each week or fraction thereof. So, it is much better to submit late than to not submit at all.

COURSE ASSESSMENT:
Assignment % of Grade
Labs (1-8) 60%
Scheduled quizzes 15%
Final Written Exam 25%
Total Points 100%
Grading Scale –
A = 90- 100% of total points possible
B = 80-89% of total points possible
C = 70-79% of total points possible
D = 60-69% of total points possible
F = < 60% of total points possible



CLASSROOM RULES OF CONDUCT:
Computers make writing and revising much easier and more productive. Students must recognize though that technology can also cause problems. Printers run out of ink and hard drive crash. Students must be responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines in spite of technology. Be sure to save copies of your work to disk, hard drive, and print out paper copies for backup purposes.
DISABILITY GUIDELINES:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University’s policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University’s policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: www.park.edu/disability.


COURSE /DATES/ASSIGNMENTS:
Note: All assignments are due on Tuesdays of the following week.
The quiz schedule will be announced in class.
Week One --

1. Read Chapters 1-4 in your textbook.
2. Complete the Week1Project1 coding project.
3. Complete the Week1Project2 coding project.

Week Two --

1. Read pages 418 - 491 Chapters 1-4 in your textbook
2. Complete the Week2Project1 coding project.
3. Complete the Week2Project2 coding project.

Week Three --

1. Read pages 316 - 406 in your textbook.
2. Complete the Week3Project1 coding project.
3. Complete the Week3Project2 coding project.

Week Four --

1. Read pages 502 - 559 in your textbook.
2. Complete the Week4Project1 coding project.
3. Complete the Week4Project2 coding project.

Week Five --

1. Read pages 570 - 630 in your textbook.
2. Complete the Week5Project1 coding project.
3. Complete the Week5Project2 coding project.


Week Six --

1. Read Pages 642 - 707 in your textbook.
2. Complete the Week6Project1 coding project.
3. Complete the Week6Project2 coding project.

Week Seven --

1. Complete the Week7Project1 coding project.

Week Eight --

1. Review for and take the Final Examination.