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LS 211 Introduction to the Humanities
Washer, Dee


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

LS 211 Introduction to the Humanities

Semester

F1T 2007 DLB

Faculty

Washer, Dee

Title

Senior Instructor

Degrees/Certificates

Master of Liberal Arts Baker University, Baldwin, Kansas

E-Mail

Dee.Washer@park.edu

Semester Dates

Aug. 20, 2007-- Oct. 14, 2007

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 WOR - Ways of Reading, 7th Ed., Bartholomae and Petrosky, 2005. ISBN 0-312-40995-8.

Students may be directed to online articles and essays as part of the assigned reading for the course.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Additional Resources:
 

Online Tutoring Services - Park University has arranged for Online students to receive five hours of free access to Online tutoring and academic support through Smarthinking. If you would like Online tutoring, please contact me to receive their recommendation and information on how to access the Online tutoring.

 

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
A study of disciplines and concerns that promote humanness (such as art, music, philosophy and religion) and critical thinking, moral values, myths, love and freedom. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
 The instructor's educational philosophy encourages peer group interactions along with instructor lectures, comments, readings, and website information. Students are expected to think critically by exploring assigned readings, the instructor's inputs through lectures and comments, their own ideas, and those of other students.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Note: This is a general education (GE) course. Therefore, some of the performance objectives are specifically related to the requirements for GE courses.
  2. Students will demonstrate understanding of theories of origin, nature, and function of humanities
  3. Students will provide evidence of skill in academic research
  4. Students will demonstrate their skills in oral communication
  5. Students will demonstrate critical, aesthetic, and values literacies, in regard to humanities
  6. Students will demonstrate a more thoughtful awareness of multicultural and global considerations


Core Assessment:

Class Assessment:
 

Class Assessment:

My goal is to give you prompt, clear, and useful feedback to help you become a better, more thoughtful writer. Each student is responsible for the following:

1. Written Project - A major research essay* exploring a topic in the Humanities. Approximately 1800-2100 words. Assessment of the written project will include developmental stages such as the prospectus and a draft. 30 % (30 pts.)
*Note: At the instructor's discretion, the nature of this project and its focus may vary from traditional models of research writing. The suggested length limit, however, will not change.
2. Explorations in the Humanities - One-page written summations exploring manifestations of humanness in specific areas of the Humanities. Students will complete three Explorations in the Humanities out of five opportunities. 20 % (20 pts.)
3. Interchanges in the Humanities - Weekly discussions centered on focal areas in the Humanities. 16 % (16 pts.)
4. Final Exam - A comprehensive final examination administered by an approved proctor during week eight. 20 % (20 pts.)
5. Correlation and Review - Weekly assessments of individual learning and progress. 10 % (10 pts.)
6. Introductions - Personal introductions and interchange. 2% (2 pts.)
7. Peer response - Posting a draft and responding to drafts of classmates. 2% (2 pts.)

Grading:
 

You will be able to track your average exactly throughout the course. The grading scale is as follows: A = 90-100; B = 80-89; C = 70-79; D = 60-69; F = 0-59. You will know in advance the standards for each assignment. My goal is to give you prompt, clear, and useful feedback to help you become a better, more thoughtful writer. Each student is responsible for the following:
1. Written Project - A major research essay* exploring a topic in the Humanities. Approximately 1800-2100 words. Assessment of the written project will include developmental stages such as the prospectus and a draft. 30 % (30 pts.)
*Note: At the instructor's discretion, the nature of this project and its focus may vary from traditional models of research writing. The suggested length limit, however, will not change.
2. Explorations in the Humanities - One-page written summations exploring manifestations of humanness in specific areas of the Humanities. Students will complete three Explorations in the Humanities out of five opportunities. 20 % (20 pts.)
3. Interchanges in the Humanities - Weekly discussions centered on focal areas in the Humanities. 16 % (16 pts.)
4. Final Exam - A comprehensive final examination administered by an approved proctor during week eight. 20 % (20 pts.)
5. Correlation and Review - Weekly assessments of individual learning and progress. 10 % (10 pts.)
6. Introductions - Personal introductions and interchange. 2% (2 pts.)
7. Peer response - Posting a draft and responding to drafts of classmates. 2% (2 pts.)

 
Grading of the Interchanges, Correlation and Review and peer response: Your responses for the Interchanges should be thoughtful and substantive to earn full credit. Examples of desirable, full-bodied responses and undesirable, partial responses will be provided during week one. In general, posts should be no shorter than four sentences. Posts can be spontaneous, suggesting, when appropriate, your tentative position on issues; nevertheless, your posts should be carefully read before making them final. Underdeveloped posts will receive partial credit.
If you have exceeded the number of required posts, entered and commented on multiple occasions, and given evidence of reading, you are likely to earn an A. B-range work meets all minimum standards, but shows few signs of seeking to exceed those standards. It is still above-average inasmuch as it grapples with the central issues of the week, raising questions and observations that connect with the reading. C-range work meets the required number of entries for the week, but at least one of those entries might fall below the suggested length range for interchanges. C-range work shows some signs of being done hastily, such as typos or incomplete sentences (have you re-read your work before posting?). Also, it tends to do less to engage with the reading or to consider how the reading sets up or addresses the question(s) or observation(s) you raise in your entry. D-range work (I hope to see very little of this in the weeks ahead) might be missing entries. It might not make reference to the reading at all, and it falls below the minimum standards for length in more than one entry. It is also confusing or merely repeating a point already raised by a peer. I rarely assign F's in the threaded discussions unless work is missing, late or glaringly underdeveloped or sloppy.
 
Proctored final examination - An examination will be taken in a proctored testing environment during the 8th week at one of the Park University sites around the country or at an alternative location. For proctored examinations, photo identification is required at the time of the test. Guidelines for selecting an acceptable proctor can be found on the Park University website.

Other Information on proctored exams:
It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor, by the 6th week of the term, who is accepted and approved by the course instructor.
Approval of proctors is the discretion of the Online instructor.  
A proctor request form will be made available to you during the first week of class so that you can send your requested proctor to your instructor for approval.  
Failure to take a final proctored exam (or submit your final project for some online graduate courses) will result in an automatic "F" grade.

Late Submission of Course Materials:
 

Work must be submitted on time to be considered for full credit. Work that is submitted late will receive a full grade deduction for each day that it is late. Therefore, an assignment that is due Sunday night by midnight will not earn passing credit after Wednesday night. Discussion posts (interchanges, correlation and review and peer response) must be completed by the end of the week to be considered for credit.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
 

Online Course Policies:

Policy #1:  Submission of Work:

  • A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday 12:01 am MST and Sunday at 11:59 PM MST. The first week begins the first day of the term/semester. Assignments scheduled for completion during a class week should be completed and successfully submitted by the posted due date.
  • Create a back up file of every piece of work you submit for grading. This will ensure that a computer glitch or a glitch in cyberspace won't erase your efforts.
  • When files are sent attached to an email, the files should be in either Microsoft Word, RTF, ASCII, txt, or PDF file formats.

Policy #2: Ground Rules for Online Communication & Participation

  • General email: Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. When sending email other than assignments, you must identify yourself fully by name and class in all email sent to your instructor and/or other members of our class.
  • Online threaded discussions: are public messages and all writings in this area will be viewable by the entire class or assigned group members.
  • Online Instructor Response Policy:  Online Instructors will check email frequently and will respond to course-related questions within 24-48 hours.
  • Observation of "Netiquette": All your Online communications need to be composed with fairness, honesty and tact.  Spelling and grammar are very important in an Online course.  What you put into an Online course reflects on your level of professionalism.  Here is an of Online reference that discuss writing Online writing rules http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html.

Policy #3: What to do if you experience technical problems or have questions about the Online classroom.  

  • If you experience computer difficulties (need help downloading a browser or plug-in, you need help logging into the course, or if you experience any errors or problems while in your Online course, click on the Help Button button in your Online Classroom, then click on the helpdesk menu item, and then fill out the form or call the helpdesk for assistance. 
  • If the issue is preventing you from submitting or completing any coursework, contact your instructor immediately.

 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
Exploration #1 due at end of Week 2, Sept. 2, Sunday midnight MST
Exploration #2 due at end of Week 3, Sept. 9, Sunday midnight MST
Exploration #3 due at end of Week 4, Sept.16, Sunday midnight MST

Exploration #4 due at end of Week 6, Sept. 30th, Sunday midnight MST
Exploration #5 due at end of Week 7, Oct. 7th, Sunday midnight MST

Project Prospectus due at end of Week 3, Sept. 9th, Sunday midnight MST
Peer Response due during Week 5
Project draft due, at end of Week 5, Sept. 23, Sunday midnight MST
Final Humanities Project due at end of Week 7, Oct. 7th, Sunday midnight MST
(Interchanges and Correlation Review postings are due Weekly)

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-86

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  3. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  4. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  5. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  6. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  7. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-88

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:7/23/2007 9:29:39 PM