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PS 402 Systems of Psychotherapy
Souza, Charles


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.
CoursePS 402 Systems of Psychotherapy FE
SemesterU1Q2005
FacultyRick Souza
TitleAdjunct Instructor in Psychology
Degrees/CertificatesMA
Licensed Professional Counselor
Office Location2300 E. 18th Street, Second floor
Office Hours8am to 5pm weekdays
Daytime Phone307-633-7370
E-Mailcsouza@piratemail.park.edu
Semester DatesMay 23 to July 24, 2005
Class Days-M-----
Class Time5:00 - 10:00 PM
PerquisitesPS101, PS401 or PS315;  Junior or Senior standing
Credit Hours3

Textbook:
Corey, G. S. (2005). Theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy (7th ed). Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole Publishing. ISBN 0-534-53605-0

Textbooks can be purchased though the MBS bookstore

Additional Resources:
Corsini:  CURRENT PSYCHOTHERAPIES
American Psychiatric Assn.:  DSM IV Casebook


Course Description:
Explores the major schools of psychotherapy. The course includes an extensive use of actual case studies.

Educational Philosophy:
This class will incorporate the following educational methods: class discussions, small group activities, case study presentations, lectures, videos, and experiential learning activities. Assessments will be conducted through participation in class activities, course paper, and class examinations.

Learning Outcomes:
1.  Given a list, be able to identify the developers of major systems of psychotherapy.
2.  Verbally and in writing, describe the benefits and limitations of psychotherapy.
3.  Given a list of alternative treatments, be able to select an appropriate treatment for a given mental disorder.
4.  List the differences between the major systems of  psychotherapy.
5.  Differentiate the various key differences between the major systems.
6.  Given a list of symptoms and other data from case studies, determine an appropriate system of psychotherapy for the client,
7.  Be able to describe, verbally and in writing, the goals of psychotherapy..
8.  Given a list of controversial legal and ethical issues, be able to discuss verbally and in writing, the ramifications of these issues for society, the family and the individual.
10.  Given a list of systems of psychotherapy, be able to differentiate, in writing, between the major therapeutic approaches of each.
11.  Be able to discuss, verbally or in writing, the alternative treatments available for the treatment of  common mental illnesses.
12.  In writing or verbally, discuss the progression of treatment in psychoanalytic, behavioral, existential, family and cognitive therapies..
13.  Be able to discuss, in writing or verbally, the disorders which may be more efficaciously be treated with pharmacotherapy.
14.  In writing or verbally, be able to compare and contrast the developmental systems defined by Freud, Erikson, Sullivan and Adler.
15.  In writing or verbally, discuss the concept of person-centered therapy.

Course Assessment:
Students will be graded based on the following:

- Two written examinations: These exams will be approximately 30 questions. They will include short answer and association test questions.

- One oral presentation: You will choose one system from the book to discuss in detail. You are expected to present a summary of the system and be able to discuss the major benefits and shortcomings of the system of psychotherapy.

Grading:
The two written examinations will be worth 60% of your grade; 30% per test.

The oral PRESENTATION will be worth 15% of your grade.

Class participation will be worth 15% of your grade.

Classroom participation will be worth 10% of your grade.

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Material turned in late will be subject to a 10% penalty per 24 hour period that it is "late".

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
: Appropriate scholastic decorum will be maintained at all times.  Students are expected to respect the statements, beliefs, attitudes and values of others at all times.  Ridicule of any person will not be tolerated.  Humor is both welcomed and encouraged, if appropriate.  Students will turn off (or set to non-audio signal) all cellular phones and pagers while in the classroom.  This is a behavior exhibiting respect for the instructor and other students.  Food and beverages are permitted as long as each student completely cleans up any residue.  The class will not be dismissed until the room resumes the same state of cleanliness and order that existed at the start of the session.  



Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
: (Subject to Change when required)
Week 1:  Reading Assignment:  Text, Chapters 1, 2.
  Introduction, course explanation, course philosophy, administrative details,  weather plan;                                                        
   continuum of personality and mental health;  psychotherapy/counseling; the DSM; clinical assessment;            theoretical constructs; case studies.  Counselor: person and professional.
     
Week 2:  Reading  assignment:  Text,  Chapters  3 and 4.  Ethical issues in psychotherapy;  Psychoanalytic therapy.
     
Week 3:  Reading assignment:  Text, Chapter 5 and 6.  Adlerian, Existential therapies.

Week 4:  Reading assignment:  Text, Chapter 7, 8, and 9.  Person-centered, Gestalt and Behavior therapies.

Week 5:  Mid-term Examination;   Reading assignment:  Text:  Chapters 10 and 11.  Cognitive-behavioral and Reality therapies.

Week 6:  Reading Assignment:  Text:  Chapters 12 and 13.  Feminist and Post modern approaches.

Week 7: Reading assignment:  Text Chapters 14 and 15.  Family systems;  Integrative approaches. Student case studies.

Week 8:  Reading Assignment:  None.  Case studies.

Week 9:  Course Review.  Final Examination.   Case studies as required.
PLEASE DISREGARD THE SCHEDULE IN THE BOX BELOW!

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Class ActivitiesAssignmentsTests
Meeting - 1
May 23, 2005
Introduction and overview of classChapters 1, 2, & 3 
Meeting - 2
May 30, 2005
 Chapters 4, 5, & 6 
Meeting - 3
June 6, 2005
First written examinatin  First written examination
Meeting - 4
June 13, 2005
 Chapters 7 & 8  
Meeting - 5
June 20, 2005
 Chapters 9, 10, & 11  
Meeting - 6
June 27, 2005
 Chapters 12, 13 & 14Drafts of paper due
Meeting - 7
July 9
 Chapters 15 & 16 
Meeting - 8
July 11
Summary and review Paper due
Meeting - 9
July 18
Oral examination &
Final examination
 Oral exam and Final exam

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.  
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog
Page 101

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. <a href="http://www.park.edu/catalog">
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog</a> Page 101

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 100

Disability Guidelines:

Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page:
http://www.park.edu/disability
 
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Copyright:
This material is copyright and can not be reused without author permission.