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AR 397A Interior Design Studio IV:Visual Communications II
Boehr, Kay Miller


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

AR 397 Interior Design Studio IV: Visual Communications II

Semester

SP 2008 HO

Faculty

Boehr, Kay Miller

Title

Assistant Professor of Interior Design/Program Coordinator for Interior Design

Degrees/Certificates

Master of Architecture
Professional Memberships:  IIDA, IDEC
Registered Architect

Office Location

MA430D

Office Hours

Tuesday and Thursday:  3:45 - 5:15 p.m. and Friday: 9:00 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

Daytime Phone

816-584-6705

E-Mail

kboehr@mail.park.edu

Semester Dates

January 14- May 9, 2008

Class Days

--T-R--

Class Time

1:00 - 3:40 p.m.

Prerequisites

AR292A

Credit Hours

3 (6 contact hours)


Textbook:

Required:
Ching, Fancis D.K. Architectural Graphics,  4th edition. New York:  John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 2003.
 
Mitton, Maureen.  Interior Design Viusal Presentation, 3rd Edition.  Hoboken, New Jersey:  John Wiley and Sons, 2007.
 
 

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

Recommended Books:
Doyle, Michael E.  Color Drawing, 2nd Edition.  New York:  John Wiley and Sons, 1999.
 
Drpic, Ivo.  Sketching and Rendering Interior Spaces.  New York:  Whitney Library of Design, 1988.
 
Lin, Mike W.  Drawing and Designing With Confidence.  New York:  John Wiley and Sons, 1993.
 
Lin, Mike W.  Architectural Rendering Techniques.  New York:  Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1985.
 
McGarry, Richard and Greg Madsen.  Marker Magic:  The Rendering Problem Solver for Designers.  New York:  Van Nostrand Reinhold. 1993.
 
Yanes, Magali Delgado and Ernest Redondo Dominguez.  Freehand Drawing for Architects and Interior Designers.  New York:  WW Norton and Company. 2005

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
Three-dimensional design and presentation techniques will be developed in this continuation of Visual Communications I. Students will learn to construct one and two point perspective drawings and will practice three-dimensional sketching. Students will apply black and white and color rendering techniques to their drawings. Students will learn model-building skills and be introduced to techniques to generate three-dimensional drawings on the computer. Prerequisites: AR396A and AR396B. Co-requisites: AR393 and AR397B. 1:5:3

Educational Philosophy:

Design:  Design is both creative and meticulous.  It is a process that involves generating ideas, then editing and refining those ideas before producing the final result.  The steps in the design proces are universal and can be applied to any design problem, whether it is a written document, the design of a space or the design of a product.
 
Teaching:  As a teacher, I articulate what I have learned as a professional, sharing my acculumated knowledge and skills with the students. This information is the basis for a variety of activities that reinforce core learning objectives.  Students observe, evaluate, collaborate and create as they approach each assignment as a design problem. Students communicate design concepts visually and orally using drawing, drafting, board building and modeling techniques.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Produce paraline drawings including isometrics and axonometrics.
  2. Prepare one-point perspective grids and draw interior spaces in perspective using the grid.
  3. Prepare two-point perspective grids and draw interior spaces in perspective using the grid.
  4. Practice estimating techniques for drawing furniture and interior spaces in perspective
  5. Delineate perspectives using black and white line, hatching, stippling and wash techniques.
  6. Improve color rendering skills, applying color to perspective drawings as well as two dimensional drawings.
  7. Construct study models and presentation models.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. Produce paraline drawings, including isometrics and axonommetrics.
  2. Prepare one-point perspective grids and draw interior spaces in perspective using the grid.
  3. Prepare two-point perspective grids and draw interior spaces in perspective using the grid.
  4. Practice estimating techniques for drawing furniture and interior spaces in perspective.
  5. Delineate perspectives using black and white line, hatching, stippling and wash techniques.
  6. Improve color rendering skills, applying color to perspective drawings as well as two dimensinal drawings.
  7. Construct study models and presentation models.
Core Assessment:

  • Application of information in text, related readings, lectures and discussions to a series of skill development assignments (outcomes 1-7)
  • Participation in studio, including individual and group critiques (outcomes 1-6)
  • Completion of a sketch journal in order to practice techniques (outcomes 1-5)
Completion of core assessment project: a series of presentation drawings that visually communicate an interior space design completed in another class. (outcomes 2, 3, 4, and 6)

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

1.  Application of information in text, related readings, lectures and discussions to a series of skill delvelopment assignments. (Outcomes 1-7)
2.  Participation in studio, including individual and group critiques. (Outcomes 1-6)
3.  Completion of a sketch journal in order to practice techniques. (Outcomes 1-5) 
4.  Completion of Core Assessment Project:  a series of presentation drawings that visually communicate an interior space design completed in another class. (Outcomes 2,3,4, and 6)

Grading:

Project One:                           10%
Semester Assignment:             40%
Sketch Binder:                        30%
Core Assessment Project:       20%
                                             100%
 
Grading System:
                                             A:   90 and above
                                             B:   80 to 89
                                             C:   70 to 79
                                             D:   60 to 69
                                             F:    below 60

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Late work will not be accepted without a legitimate written excuse attached.  Late work must be turned in (with excuse attached) by the beginning of the next scheduled class or the assignment grade will be lowered 5%. An additional 5% subtracted for each class period that the work is late.  There will be no make up dates for missed presentations, and regardless of excuse, the student will not recieve points for the presentation component of the assignment.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

AR397A is primarily a studio class. Class format will include lecture/demonstration, discussion and group critiques of work, as well as time to practice visual communication skills and techniques.  Group interaction speeds learning and increases the depth of study for all.  Feedback from the instructor is an important element of learning. Students are expected to come to class with tools and supplies, prepared to work in class.  The studio and computer lab will be available for students' use when the rooms are not scheduled for other classes.  Students are expected to work a minimum of six hours a week outside of class, in addition to making full use of studio time.
 
A professional and respectful attitude toward the instructor and fellow students is expected.  Tardiness, leaving before class is dismissed, and other class disruptions (i.e. phone calls, etc.) will be noted and reflected in the final grade.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

See attachment below for Course Topics/Dates/Assignments

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-86

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  3. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  4. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  5. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  6. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  7. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-88
Instructor's Attendance Policy:
Class attendance is required.  An attendance sheet will be passed around at the beginning of each class while announcements are being made.  It is the student's responsibility to sign the attendance sheet at this time.  Students who do not sign the attendance sheet, but arrive after it is distributed, will be considered late.  Three late arrivals will equal one absence.
In case of illness or emergency, the instructor must be notified prior to class by sending an e-mail message. Each student will be allowed three absences, which, if proper notification is sent, will be recorded as "excused." Thus each of the following will result in a 5% deduction from the final grade:
1. Three "tardies" equaling one unexcused absence.
2. Any absence that is not excused by a written (e-mail)notification.
3. The fourth and each subsequent absence, regardless of excuse.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .


Attachments:
Course Topics/dates/assignments

Supply List

Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
The space is visually analyzed, breaking it into components that are each accurately drawn.

One point perspective:
1.The station point (location of the viewer), cone of vision and picture plane (area to be illustrated) are appropriately selected as evidenced by drawings made in plan.
2. A one point grid is accurately developed and drawn:
a. The width of the grid matches the area within the  cone of vision
b.  The height of the grid matches ceiling height of space to be drawn.
c. The vanishing point or center of vision is at eye level.
d. The distance point represents the distance of the viewer from the picture plane.
e.  The distance point is used to establish horizontal lines on the grid.

There is no distortion in the grid.

Two point perspective:
The grid is accurately drawn following these steps:
1. A plan is drawn to locate vanishing points and measuring points:  
a. The floor plan is drawn with one corner touching the horizon line, and the station point and cone of vision are drawn.
b. Vanishing points and measuring points are plotted and dimensioned.
2.  An outside edge or inside corner of the space is used as a measuring line or principal vertical axis.
3.  Measurements are plotted on the two principal horizontal axes using the measuring point system to determine the spacing.
4.  A grid is drawn in the floor plane and one wall in which all lines vanish to the proper points.

For each type of perspective drawing:
Each component of the space, including architectural elements, furniture, plants and people is separately drawn using the grid and estimating techniques, on tracing paper overlaying the grid.

Dimensions less than one foot are estimated using the “division of a square” method.

Curved lines are drawn using the circle method.

Angled lines are correctly plotted on the grid.

Height of object is correctly drawn by projecting lines to one of the side walls for measurement.

There are no short cuts:  each detail and component of the space is carefully drawn so that all lines are accurately in perspective.


 
The space is visually analyzed, breaking it into components that are each accurately drawn.

One point perspective:
1.The station point (location of the viewer), cone of vision and picture plane (area to be illustrated) are appropriately selected as evidenced by drawings made in plan.
2. A one point grid is accurately developed and drawn:
a. The width of the grid matches the area within the  cone of vision
b.  The height of the grid matches ceiling height of space to be drawn.
c. The vanishing point or center of vision is at eye level.
d. The distance point represents the distance of the viewer from the picture plane.
e.  The distance point is used to establish horizontal lines on the grid.

There may be some distortion in the floor plane of the grid

Two point perspective:
The grid is accurately drawn following these steps, but there may be slight distortion caused by errors of accuracy:
1. A plan is drawn to locate vanishing points and measuring points:  
a. The floor plan is drawn with one corner touching the horizon line, and the station point and cone of vision are drawn.
b. Vanishing points and measuring points are plotted and dimensioned.
2.  An outside edge or inside corner of the space is used as a measuring line or principal vertical axis.
3.  Measurements are plotted on the two principal horizontal axes using the measuring point system to determine the spacing.
4.  A grid is drawn in the floor plane and one wall in which all lines vanish to the proper points.

For each  type of perspective drawing:
Each component of the space, including architectural elements, furniture, plants and people is separately drawn using the grid and estimating techniques, on tracing paper overlaying the grid.

Dimensions less than one foot are estimated using the “division of a square” method.

Curved lines are drawn using the circle method.

Angled lines are correctly plotted on the grid.

Height of object is correctly drawn by projecting lines to one of the side walls for measurement.

Some of the details and components are distorted or inaccurate because the student attempted short cuts and did not plot or properly estimate each item.
 
The space is visually analyzed, breaking it into components.  Some components are not included or are not accurately drawn.

One point perspective:
1.Plan drawings are not accurate.
2. A one point grid is developed and drawn, but least one of the criteria below is missing or incorrect:
a. The width of the grid matches the area within the  cone of vision
b.  The height of the grid matches ceiling height of space to be drawn.
c. The vanishing point or center of vision is at eye level.
d. The distance point represents the distance of the viewer from the picture plane.
e.  The distance point is used to establish horizontal lines on the grid.

There is some distortion in the floor plane of the grid

Two point perspective:
The grid is drawn following these steps, but one step is incorrect or missing, resulting in an inaccurate grid:

1. A plan is drawn to locate vanishing points and measuring points:  
a. The floor plan is drawn with one corner touching the horizon line, and the station point and cone of vision are drawn.
b. Vanishing points and measuring points are plotted and dimensioned.
2.  An outside edge or inside corner of the space is used as a measuring line or principal vertical axis.
3.  Measurements are plotted on the two principal horizontal axes using the measuring point system to determine the spacing.
4.  A grid is drawn in the floor plane and one wall in which all lines vanish to the proper points.

For each  type of perspective drawing:

Not all components are drawn and those that are drawn may be inaccurate because the student did not plot the items on the grid or did not use proper estimating techniques.
 
More than one component of the space is not analyzed or more than one component is not accurately drawn.

One point perspective:
Two or more of the following conditions exist:
1.  The plan drawings are not accurate.
2. The one point grid is not accurate because:
a.  The width of the grid does not match the area within the cone of vision.
b.  The height of the grid does not correspond with the ceiling height of the room.
c. The vanishing point is not at eye level.
d.  The distance point is not the distance of the viewer from the picture plane.
e.  The distance point does is not used to establish horizontal lines on the grid.

There is distortion in the final grid.

Two point perspective:
The grid is either not drawn or is inaccurate because more than one of the steps was not followed:

1. A plan is drawn to locate vanishing points and measuring points:  
a. The floor plan is drawn with one corner touching the horizon line, and the station point and cone of vision are drawn.
b. Vanishing points and measuring points are plotted and dimensioned.
2.  An outside edge or inside corner of the space is used as a measuring line or principal vertical axis.
3.  Measurements are plotted on the two principal horizontal axes using the measuring point system to determine the spacing.
4.  A grid is drawn in the floor plane and one wall in which all lines vanish to the proper points.

For each  type of perspective drawing:

Very few  components are drawn and those that are drawn are inaccurate because the student did not plot the items on the grid or did not use proper estimating techniques.
 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
A final overlay combines each element into a visually pleasing  and understandable version of reality as we perceive it.

All four Principals of Perspective are used to increase the impression of reality:
a.  diminution of size
b.  overlapping of forms
c.  convergence of parallel lines
d.  Foreshortening

All  five depth cues are used that make the drawings more understandable:
a. Texture density
b.  blur
c.  detail
d.  abrupt shift in brightness to signify an edge
e.  gradual transitions in brightness.

Color and value are used to enhance the drawing:

a. Shadows are accurately projected and add depth, and are transparent and include the color of the background.
b.  Surfaces are rendered using at least two colors, a base color  with pencil texture or wash.
c.  A focal point is highlighted with richly varied colors while less important areas fade away.
d.  White pencil or pastel or gouache is used for highlights.


 
A final overlay combines each element into a visually pleasing and understandable  version of reality as we perceive it.

Three out of four Principals of Perspective are used to increase the impression of reality:
a.  diminution of size
b.  overlapping of forms
c.  convergence of parallel lines
d.  Foreshortening

Three out of five depth cues are used that make the drawings more understandable:
a. Texture density
b.  blur
c.  detail
d.  abrupt shift in brightness to signify an edge
e.  gradual transitions in brightness.

Color and value are used to enhance the drawing:

a.  Shadows add depth, but may not be transparent or accurate.
b. Surfaces are rendered using at least two colors.
c. There is no discernable focal point.
d.  Highlights are not. noticeable.

 
A final overlay combines each element into  an understandable  version of reality as we perceive it.

Two out of four Principals of Perspective are used to increase the impression of reality:
a.  diminution of size
b.  overlapping of forms
c.  convergence of parallel lines
d.  Foreshortening

Two out of five depth cues are used that make the drawings more understandable:
a. Texture density
b.  blur
c.  detail
d.  abrupt shift in brightness to signify an edge
e.  gradual transitions in brightness.

Color and value are used, but they do not enhance the drawing.  At least one of the following elements are lacking:

a. Shadows
b.  Focal points
c.  Highlights
OR,
Color is too strong and distracts from the drawing


 
. The final drawing is incomplete and as a result is not understandable or visually pleasing.

One of the  four Principals of Perspective are used to increase the impression of reality:
a.  diminution of size
b.  overlapping of forms
c.  convergence of parallel lines
d.  Foreshortening

One out of five depth cues are used that make the drawings more understandable:
a. Texture density
b.  blur
c.  detail
d.  abrupt shift in brightness to signify an edge
e.  gradual transitions in brightness.

The drawings either have no color applied, or the color distracts rather than enhances the visual effect.
 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
2, 3, 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
The ability to learn a new skill or knowledge in new situation:

The student applies all the perspective drawing skills introduced and practiced during the semester to a project that he/she has designed, but that has never been built.

The final perspectives give the viewer an understanding of what the space will look like.

The act of drawing the perspectives enables the student to refine and improve the design.

The  one point drawing is not static or boring because the vanishing point is off center and interesting details are included.


 
The ability to learn a new skill or knowledge in new situation:

The student applies most of  the perspective drawing skills introduced and practiced during the semester to a project that they have designed, but that has never been built.

The final perspectives give the viewer an understanding of what the space will look like.


 
The ability to learn a new skill or knowledge in new situation:

The student applies some of  the perspective drawing skills introduced and practiced during the semester to a project that they have designed, but that has never been built.

The final perspectives are not easy to understand
 
The ability to learn a new skill or knowledge in new situation:

The student applies none of  the perspective drawing skills introduced and practiced during the semester to a project that they have designed, but that has never been built.

The final drawings are incomplete.
 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
3,4,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
The ability to make a judgment about the value of something by using a standard:

Student participates in individual critiques during studio sessions.

Student presents final work to class for critique.
 
Student gives meaningful critique of work of peers during the final presentation

Student assists other students in solving problems in drawing perspectives.
 
The ability to make a judgment about the value of something by using a standard:

Student participates in individual critiques during studio sessions.

Student presents final work to class for critique.

Student gives meaningful critique of work of peers during the final presentation.
 
The ability to make a judgment about the value of something by using a standard:

The student is not present for individual critique during one of the studio sessions.

Student presents final work to class for critique.
 
The ability to make a judgment about the value of something by using a standard:

The student is not present for individual critique during more than one of the studio sessions.

Student does not present work at the final critique.
 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Visual communication is the primary content for this assignment.  The visual communication consists of a presentation board that includes the two required drawings.
The visual communication is supported by an oral presentation:

Student makes an excellent visual and oral presentation of the project.  
 
Visual communication is the primary content for this assignment.  The visual communication consists of a presentation board that includes the two required drawings.
The visual communication is supported by an oral presentation:

Student makes a good visual and oral presentation of the project.  
 
Visual communication is the primary content for this assignment.  The visual communication consists of a presentation board that includes the two required drawings.
The visual communication is supported by an oral presentation:

Student makes a fair visual and oral presentation of the project.  
 
Visual communication is the primary content for this assignment.  The visual communication consists of a presentation board that includes the two required drawings.
The visual communication is supported by an oral presentation:

Student makes a poor visual and oral presentation of the project.  
 
Whole Artifact: Presentation                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Outcomes
2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
CRAFTSMANSHIP: Whole artifact:

Final presentation board is well crafted with straight cuts and no rough edges.

Final presentation includes two perspective drawings, each wrapped around illustration or foam core and adhered to the presentation board with foam double stick tape.

Board title block and labeling enhances and explains the presentation.

A key plan is included that  is neat, consistent and readable.

Overall graphic layout of board is visually pleasing.

The overall presentation is exceptionally well-crafted and enhances the individual drawings.

All process drawings are combined into a packet in which the drawings line up and the layers are clearly visible.  All sheets are the same size and the edges are bound.

 
CRAFTSMANSHIP: Whole artifact:

Final presentation board is well crafted with straight cuts and no rough edges.

Final presentation includes two perspective drawings, each wrapped around illustration or foam core and adhered to the presentation board with foam double stick tape.

Board title block and labeling enhances and explains the presentation.

A key plan is included that  is neat, consistent and readable.

Most process drawings are combined into a packet. Drawings may not line up and the layers are not clearly visible.  All sheets are the same size and the edges are bound.


 
CRAFTSMANSHIP: Whole artifact:

Final presentation board may have rough edges and some mounting may be crooked.

Final presentation includes two perspective drawings, but they are not properly adhered to the board, either because glue marks show, they are not cut straight or mounting is crooked.

Board title block and/or labeling is sloppy, badly hand lettered or not consistent.

Key plan is missing.

Some process drawings are combined into a packet. Drawings may not line up and the layers are not clearly visible.  Sheets are not consistently sized and the packet is not bound.  

 
CRAFTSMANSHIP: Whole artifact:

Final presentation board may have rough edges and some mounting may be crooked.

Final presentation is incomplete in that at least one drawing is not included.

Drawing or drawings are  not properly adhered to the board, either because glue marks show, they are not cut straight or mounting is crooked.

The presentation board does not have a title block or labeling.

Key plan is missing.

Process packet is not turned in.

 
Components                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
CRAFTSMANSHIP:
Components:

Each drawing:
Line work is clean and crisp.
Line weights vary appropriately.
Perspective views are accurate.
Color enhances the viewer's understanding of the space.
 
CRAFTSMANSHIP:
Components:

Each drawing :
Line work is clean and crisp.
Perspective views are accurate.
Color enhances the viewer's understanding of the space.
 
CRAFTSMANSHIP:
Components:

Each drawing :
Line work is hesitant, too light or too dark.
Perspective views are accurate.
Color does not enhance the viewer's understanding of the space.



 
CRAFTSMANSHIP:
Components:
Each drawing :
Line work is hesitant, too light or too dark.
Perspective views are not accurate.
Color does not enhance the viewer's understanding of the space.

 

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Last Updated:1/11/2008 12:20:01 PM