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EDU 367 Assessment in Education
Shorley, Marlin D.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

EDU 367 Assessment in Education

Semester

SP 2008 HO

Faculty

Shorley, Marlin D.

Title

Adjunct Instructor

Degrees/Certificates

Master of Arts Counseling UMKC
Licensed Professional Counselor
Certified School Psychologist

Office Location

Copley Hall/Park University

Office Hours

by appointment

Daytime Phone

816-679-3561

Other Phone

816-584-6342

E-Mail

mshorley@park.edu

mshorley@kc.rr.com

Class Days

---W---

Class Time

5:30 - 8:00 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 

COURSE TEXTBOOK:

            Popham, W. James. (2006) Assessment for Educational Leaders

                        Boston, MA. Pearson Education, Inc. ISBN 0205424007

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Banks, Steven R. (2005). Classroom Assessment Issues and Practices. New York, Pearson

Barton, Linda G. (1997). Quick Flip Questions for Critical Thinking. Edupress, Highsmith Inc.

Chappuis, Jan (November 2005). Helping Students Understand Assessment, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 63(3), 39-43

Culham, Ruth (2006). 100 Trait-Specific Comments, A quick guide for giving constructive feedback on student writing. New York, Scholastic, Inc.

Haggart, William (2002). A Guide to the Kaleidoscope Profile: Interpreting your Styles. Arlington, TX, Performance Learning Systems, Publications Division

http://dese.mo.gov/divimprove/curriculum/unitindex.html, Curriculum, Assessment, National Assessment of Educational Progress. And Gifted Programs

Marzano, Robert J. (2000). Transforming Classroom Grading. Alexandria, Virginia, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

McTighe, J. & O’Connor, K, (November 2005) Seven Practices for Effective Learning. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 63(3), 10-17

Niguidula, David (November 2005). Documenting Learning with Digital Portfolios. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 63(3), 44-47

Popham, W. James (September, 2004). Why Assessment Illiteracy is Professional Suicide. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 62 (1), 82-83

Sattler, Jerome M. (1992). Assessment of Children, Revised and Updated Third Edition. San         Diego. Jerome M. Sattler Publisher, Inc.

Stiggins, Rick (May 2007). Assessment Through the Student’s Eyes. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 64 (8), 22-26

Tomlinson, Carol Ann. (2003). Instructional Strategies for the Differentiated Classroom, (Complex InstructionVideo 4 and Facilitator’s Guide) (Available from Association for Supervision and Development, Alexandria Virginia)

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
This course is designed to address issues relating to formal and informal assessment, teacher-made tests, authentic,assessment, as well as standardized tests. Emphasis will be on tests utilized in Missouri. Fieldwork in the schools will be required. Prerequisites: EDU 203 and admission to the School for Education. Ideally it should be taken simultaneously with the appropriate 359 "Strategies" class. To be taken simultaneously with Practicum. 3:0:3.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will practice and use formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social and physical development of the learner.
  2. Analyze educational assessment from various perspectives including the classroom teacher, students and parents.
  3. Practice a variety of assessment tools utilizing formal and informal assessment measures
  4. Evaluate the quality of various assessment tools utilizing nationally recognized standards including but not limited to validity, reliability and absence of bias.
  5. Acquire the skills necessary to construct and/or modify a variety of classroom assessments.
  6. Explain the implementation, interpretation and utilization of norm, referenced, group achievement and aptitude tests including the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP)
  7. Communicate assessment results to students, parents, and peers.
  8. Utilize assessment results to evaluate classroom instruction for a diverse student population.
  9. Explain the professional (legal and ethical) responsibilities in relationship to educational assessment
  10. Practice theories and applications of technology in education settings and have adequate technological skills to create meaningful learning opportunities for all students


Core Assessment:

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Oral and written presentation of research found on various assessment tools

Class Assessment:
 

GRADING PLAN:

Myers Briggs Profile                                                     20 points

            Reflection                                                         10 points

Selected and Constructed Response Items                    90 points

            Reflection                                                         10 points

Likert Inventory                                                            10 points

            Reflection                                                         10 points

Rubric for Performance Assessment                              10 points

            Reflection                                                         10 points

Case Study                                                                   10 points

            Reflection                                                         10 points

Chapter Reflections 4 @ 10 points each                        40 points

Participation e-companion 8 times @5 point’s ea.         40 points

Reflection Presentation and Portfolio     (CORE)           60 points

                                                            TOTAL            330 points

“A”      =          297-330 points

“B”       =          264-296 points

“C”      =          231-263 points

“D”      =          198-230 points

Late Submission of Course Materials:
 

LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS: Prior arrangements must be made with the instructor for late assignments. Assignments not submitted on the due date will NOT receive full credit.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
 

CLASSROOM RULES OF CONDUCT: Computers make writing and revising much easier and more productive. Students must recognize though that technology can also cause problems. Printers run out of ink and hard drives crash. Students must be responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines in spite of technology. Be sure to save copies of your work to disk, hard drive, and print out paper copies for backup purposes.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

WEEK

DATES

TOPIC/ASSIGNMENT

1

January 16/23

Orientation and complete Meyers Briggs Profile

 Assignment- Reflection on your profile. (Rubric for    reflection) due 8/23 (MoSTEP 1.2.8.4

        Read Chapters 1 & 2 of the text

In class discussion and practice exercises

    Assignment: Reflection of chapter 1 & 2 (Rubric-chapters) d

        Read Chapters  3 & 4 of the text

2

January 30

In class discussion and practice exercises

   Assignment: Reflection of chapters 1-2 & 3- 4 due 2/6

       Read Chapters 5 & 6

In class discussion and practice exercises

   Assignment: Reflection of chapters 5 & 6 due 2/13

      Read Chapter 7 & 8

3

February 6th

 In class discussion and practice exercises

   Assignment: Reflection on chapters 7 & 8 (Rubric)

Due 2/20

Meet at the Library for library orientation and choose book to use for development of constructed and selected response items. Bring your student ID to check out books

     Assignment: Read your chosen book from the library, Read chapter 9 from the text.

4

February 13th

We will review Chapter 9 and then we will begin developing selected-response items in class.

   Assignment- Develop questions based on content of your library book and bring them for peer review on 2/20.

Peer review of your developed selected-response questions.

   Assignment: Make corrections, etc. on your questions –they will be due ______

   Read Chapter 10

5

February 20th

We will review Chapter 10 and then we will begin developing constructed-response items in class.

   Assignment: Develop constructed-response items based on content of your library book and bring them for peer review on

_________.

Peer review of your developed constructive response items in class

   Assignment: Make corrections, etc on your questions-they will be due

Read Chapter 11

6

February 27

Discussion of Chapter 11. In class video and activities using the 6+ trait scoring for performance. Using rubrics. Begin developing rubrics.

Practice development of rubrics. If available, we will use the computer lab to develop rubrics.

Assignment: Develop rubrics using your chosen book from the library and your essay questions to develop a rubric. Due for peer review ______. Final copy due _______

 

7

March 5th

 Peer review of rubrics. Final copy due ________. Discussion of Portfolios.  

Assignment: Read chapter 12

Discussion of chapter 12, in class quiz over chapter

Assignment: Read Chapter 13

 

8

March 12

Review of Chapter 13. Begin development of a Likert Scale in class.

Assignment: Develop a Likert Scale, based on the age group you would like to teach. Due for peer review ______

Peer review of Likert Scales. Final scale due _______

Assignment: Read Chapter 14 

 

Reflections of your development of: (see Rubric)

     Selected-Response Items

     Constructed-Response Items

     Performance Assessment (Portfolio/Rubrics)

     Likert Scale

Your reflections are due ___________

 

 

 

 

9

March 19th

Review of Chapter 14 in class. Begin discussion of Standardized Tests.

Assignment: Go to the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education web: http://dese.mo.gov/divimprove/curriculum/unitindex.html.

Prepare an information page for your Assessment Portfolio answering the following questions:  

As a teacher, what resources are available to help you prepare your students and yourself for the MAP? 

What information is available to you about your school?

What are the professional/ethical issues in standardized testing?

Due: _______________

MAP and other commonly used group tests.

(handouts in class)

Assignment: Formulate ideas for your Reflection Presentation. 

10

March 26th

Standardized Test: Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children

Assignment: work on your Reflection Presentation

 

Standardized Test: Stanford Binet Scales of Intelligence

Wechsler Intelligence Scales, Woodcock Johnson, Wechsler Individual Achievement Test etc.

 

Assignment: work on your Reflection Presentation

 

11

April 2nd

Tuesday: Standardized Test: Woodcock Johnson Tests of Achievement/

Assignment: work on your Reflection Presentation

Thursday: Interpretation of test results. Case studies in class.

Assignment: You will be given a case study to write a diagnostic summary to determine whether or not this student may qualify for special services. If the determination is “yes”, how was that determined? (Guidelines given in class) Due 4/9.

12

April 9th

Tuesday: Presentation of your case study findings in class.

Assignment: Reflection of the process of analyzing assessment information for your case study.

Current issues in the field of Assessment including methods of grading.

Assignment, choose one article provided for this class and write a reflection about it. Due

13

April 16

Begin writing to MoSTEP Standard 1.2.8 It is due 12/4. Your Assessment Portfolio is also due 12/4.

 

 

14

April 23rd

 Reflection Presentations

 

 Reflection Presentations

15/16

April 30th

May 9th

Share reflections of current assessment issues

Turn in MoStep Standard and your assessment portfolio

 

Final Assessment

16

FINALS WEEK

Spring classes end May 9 , 2008

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85-86

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 85

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  3. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  4. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  5. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  6. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  7. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2007-2008 Undergraduate Catalog Page 87-88

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:
 


LIKERT INVENTORIES- 10 POINTS


(MoSTEP .2.8.1, NCATE 1, ISLLC 2, NBPTS 3)


Choose the affective variable you want to assess from the list below: (note: avoid political and religious values)


Positive attitudes towards learning


Positive attitudes towards self


Positive attitudes towards self as a learner


Subject related interests (math science, etc)


Interest in reading


Interest in emerging technology


Value targets (honesty, integrity, justice, or freedom)


Generate a series of favorable and unfavorable statements regarding the affective variable. (General rule- 10 for secondary students, 5 or 6 for elementary students)


 In class, Get at least 2 people to classify each statement as positive or negative. (Toss out any statement that is not unanimously positive or negative)


Decide on the number and phrasing of the response options for each statement


Prepare the self-report inventory, giving students directions regarding how to respond and stipulating that the inventory must be completed anonymously.


Administer the inventory to your classmates.


Score the inventories


Identify and eliminate statements that fail to function in accord with the other statements (internal consistency)


Turn in final inventory for grading.





ASSIGNMENT FOR Selected and Constructed Response Test Items


Name___________________________________________             Date________


Based on the excerpt you have chosen from the library, you are to develop the following types of test questions: (total: 90 points)


****Select-Response: 


Write 4 binary-choice test items (true-false)


Write 2 multiple-choice test items


Write 1 matching test item


****BONUS Optional- Unusual Multiple Binary Choice


****Constructed-Response:


Write 2 short-answer test items.


Write 2 Essay test items as follows:


One should be a restricted-response item


One should be an extended-response item


Develop EITHER a holistic OR an analytic scoring guide for the extended-response item (b).





SCORING CHECKLISTS FOR Selected and Constructed Response Test Items


(MoSTEP 1.2.8.1, NCATE 1, ISLLC2) 90 points


Student Name____________________________


SELECT RESPONSE


**BINARY-CHOICE


___ Directions are concise/clear


___ No ambiguous statements (pronouns avoided)


___ No unintentional clues


___ Straight forward, simple sentences


___  Vocabulary is suitable for the task


___ Only use 2 options (i.e. “T/F, Y/N, C/I” etc)


___ A superficial analysis suggests the wrong answer


___ No “negative” statements or absolutes


___ One concept in statement


___ Equal number of items for each category


___ Similar statement length in each category


“UNUSUAL MULTIPLE BINARY CHOICE” (optional-bonus points)


___ Directions are concise/clear


___ No ambiguous statements (pronouns avoided)


___ No unintentional clues


___ Straight forward, simple sentences


___ Vocabulary is suitable for the task


___ Separate item clusters vividly from one another


___ Each item meshes well with the cluster stimulus


**MULTIPLE CHOICE


___ Directions are concise/clear


___ No ambiguous statements (pronouns avoided)


___ No unintentional clues


___ Straight forward, simple sentences


___ Vocabulary is suitable for the task


___ The stem is self-contained and clearly describes the task


___ No “negative” stated stems


___ Answers are in random, alternative positions


___ Never use “all of the above” BUT can use “none of the above”


** MATCHING


___ Directions are concise/clear


___ No ambiguous statements (pronouns avoided)


___ No unintentional clues


___ Straight forward, simple sentences


___ Vocabulary is suitable for the task


___ Premises on left side of paper


___ Response selections on right side of paper


___ Premises/responses are homogeneous


___ No more than 10 premises


CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE


** SHORT ANSWER


___ Direct question rather than incomplete statements for young students


___ Structure the item so that a response should be concise


___ Place blanks in the margin for direct questions or near the end of incomplete


        statements


___ For incomplete statements use only 1 or at most 2 blanks


___ Make sure blanks for all items are equal in length


** ESSAY


___ Convey to students a clear idea regarding the extensiveness of the response desired


___ Construct items so that the student’s task is explicitly described


___ Provide students with the approximate time to be expended on each items as well as


        each item’s value


___ Do not employ optional items                   


___      Restricted-response – decisively limit the form and content of students’ response


            i.e. “no more than 25 words”


___      Extended-response – These items provide students with far more latitude in


            responding.   Limit the space available to write – limit the number of extended


            response items in a test.


HOLISTIC OR ANALYTIC SCORING GUIDE FOR EXTENDED-RESPONSE


Holistic and Analytic                                         add for Analytic


                        Unaceptable     Satisfactory      Outstanding


Factor                                                              (0 points)          (1 point)           (2 points)


___ Organization                                             ___                  ___                  ___


___ Communicative Clarity                              ___                  ___                  ___


___ Audience Adaptation                                ___                  ___                  ___


___ Word Choice                                           ___                  ___                  ___


___ Mechanics (COPS)                                  ___                  ___                  ___






Name of person presenting:    _________________________                                                                                                                 Date________________________


Rubric for Assessment Presentation

Based on the reflections you have written for this class, choose 1 (one) or 2 (two) ideas you believe will help you in the world of assessment. Using a power point presentation, you are to describe the assessment technique and provide examples of how you will use it to benefit your students. You need to turn in a copy of your power point on the day of presentation.



   
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
       
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
       
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
       
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
       
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
       
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
       
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
       
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
       
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
       
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
       
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
       
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
       
       
           
           
           
           
           
           
       
   

           Introduction
           

           

9 points


           

           

7 points


           

           

5 points


           

           

0 points-no evidence


           

           Total points
           

           

The introduction presents the overall topic and draws the audience into the presentation with compelling questions or by relating to the audience’s interests or goals


           

           

The introduction is clear and coherent and relates to the topic


           

           

The introduction shows some structure but does not create a strong sense of what is to follow. May be overly detailed or incomplete and is somewhat appealing to the audience.


           

           

No introduction


           

           Content
           

           

9 points


           

           

7 points


           

           

5 points


           

           

0 points no evidence


           

           Total points
           

           

The content is written clearly and concisely with a logical progression of ideas and supporting information. The student demonstrates full knowledge (more than required) with explanations and elaboration


           

           

The content is written with a logical progression of ideas and supporting information. The student is at ease with content, but fails to elaborate


           

           

The content is vague in conveying a point of view and does not create a strong sense of purpose. The student is uncomfortable with information and cannot answer questions about subject.


           

           

No content


           

           

Originality


           

           

9 points


           

           

7 points


           

           

3 points


           

           

0 points no evidence


           

           

Total


           

           

Presentation shows considerable originality and inventiveness. The content and ideas are presented in a unique and interesting way.


           

           

Presentation shows some originality and inventiveness. The content and ideas are presented in an interesting way


           

           

Presentation shows an attempt at originality and inventiveness on 1 or 2 slides


           

           

No presentation


           

           

Visuals


           

           

9 points


           

           

7 points


           

           

3 points


           

           

0 points no evidence


           

           

Total


           

           

The fonts are easy to read and point size varies appropriately for headings and text. Use of italics, bold, and indentations enhances readability. Text is appropriate in length for the target audience and to the point. The background and colors enhance the readability of the text. The layout is aesthetically pleasing and contributes to the overall message with appropriate use of headings and subheadings and white space.


           

           

Sometimes the fonts are easy to read, but in a few places the use of fonts, italics, bold, long paragraphs, color or busy background detracts and does not enhance readability. The layout uses horizontal and vertical white space appropriately


           

           

Overall readability is difficult with lengthy paragraphs, too many different fonts, dark or busy background, overuse of bold or lack of appropriate indentations of text. The layout shows some structure, but appears cluttered and busy or distracting with large gaps of white space or uses a distracting background.


           

           

Unreadable


           

           

Writing Mechanics


           

           

9 points


           

           

7 points


           

           

3 points


           

           

0 points-no evidence


           

           

Total


           

           

The text is written with no errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling


           

           

The text is clearly written with little or no editing required for grammar, punctuation, and spelling


           

           

Spelling, punctuation, and grammar errors distract or impair readability


           

           

Unable to read


           

           

Delivery


           

           

9 points


           

           

7 points


           

           

3 points


           

           

0 points-


           

           

Total


           

           

Student used a clear voice and correct, precise pronunciation of terms


           

           

Student’s voice is clear. Student pronounces most words correctly


           

           

Student incorrectly pronounces terms. Audience members have difficulty hearing presentation


           

           

Undelivered


           

           Total Points
           

Comments:

Bibliography:
 

Bibliography:

 

Banks, Steven R. (2005). Classroom Assessment Issues and Practices. New York, Pearson

Barton, Linda G. (1997). Quick Flip Questions for Critical Thinking. Edupress, Highsmith Inc.

Chappuis, Jan (November 2005). Helping Students Understand Assessment, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 63(3), 39-43

Culham, Ruth (2006). 100 Trait-Specific Comments, A quick guide for giving constructive feedback on student writing. New York, Scholastic, Inc.

Haggart, William (2002). A Guide to the Kaleidoscope Profile: Interpreting your Styles. Arlington, TX, Performance Learning Systems, Publications Division

http://dese.mo.gov/divimprove/curriculum/unitindex.html, Curriculum, Assessment, National Assessment of Educational Progress. And Gifted Programs

Marzano, Robert J. (2000). Transforming Classroom Grading. Alexandria, Virginia, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

McTighe, J. & O’Connor, K, (November 2005) Seven Practices for Effective Learning. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 63(3), 10-17

Niguidula, David (November 2005). Documenting Learning with Digital Portfolios. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 63(3), 44-47

Popham, W. James (September, 2004). Why Assessment Illiteracy is Professional Suicide. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 62 (1), 82-83

Sattler, Jerome M. (1992). Assessment of Children, Revised and Updated Third Edition. San         Diego. Jerome M. Sattler Publisher, Inc.

Stiggins, Rick (May 2007). Assessment Through the Student’s Eyes. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development 64 (8), 22-26

Tomlinson, Carol Ann. (2003). Instructional Strategies for the Differentiated Classroom, (Complex InstructionVideo 4 and Facilitator’s Guide) (Available from Association for Supervision and Development, Alexandria Virginia)

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Last Updated:2/2/2008 8:24:12 AM