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ED 500 Foundations of Adult Education
Alejandro, Jeffery E.


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

ED 500 Foundations of Adult Education

Semester

S1P 2008 DL

Faculty

Alejandro, Jeffery E.

Title

Assistant Professor of Adult Education/Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

Ed.D. in Higher Education Administration - East Carolina University
MAEd in Adult Education - East Carolina University
BA in Public Relation  - University of North Carolina at Pembroke

Office Location

Greenville, NC

Office Hours

Sunday - Saturday, 9:00am - 10:00pm Eastern

Daytime Phone

(252) 917-2205

Other Phone

(252) 328-9342 (fax)

E-Mail

jeffery.alejandro@park.edu

jeffery.alejandr@hotmail.com

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Title:  Key Concepts in Adult Education
Author:  Malcolm Tight
Publisher:  Routledge Falmer
ISBN:    0-415-27579-2

Tight Book


________________________________________________________________________

Title:  Philosophical Foundations of Adult Education
Author:  J.L. Elias & S.B. Merriam
Publisher:  Krieger
ISBN: 1-57524-254-0

Philosophical book cover

 

________________________________________________________________________

Title:  Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association 5th ed.
Author:  American Psychological Association
Publisher:  American Psychological Association
ISBN: 1-55798-810-2

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
The course will provide a historical perspective of adult education theory, philosophy, and practice, and will examine the role of the adult educator in the 21st century. Additionally, the course will investigate andragogy and various adult learning and teaching theories.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Distinguish between the various historical events in adult education. (CPAE 1)
  2. Compare and contrast the differing adult education philosophies. (CPAE 1, 3, 6)
  3. Identify the different adult teaching and learning theories. (CPAE 1,2, 3, 6; NBTPS 1.2, 2.1)
  4. Assess the field of adult education in a global context. (CPAE 4; NBTPS 5.1)
  5. Review and analyze academic literature from various journals and books. (CPAE 6; NBTPS 4.3)
  6. Evaluate the role of the adult education professional. (CPAE 3, 4; NBTPS 4.3, 5.1)
  7. Apply the learning from this course in adult learning environments. (CPAE 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; NBTPS 1.2)


Core Assessment:

Core Learning Assessment: ED 500


Below please find the core learning assessment for ED 500.  The assessment meets all course learning outcomes except number one.  Attached is the grading rubric which documents course elements required in the assignment.


At the completion of this course learners will be able to:



  • Distinguish between the various historical events in adult education.  (CPAE 1)
  • Compare and contrast the differing adult education philosophies. (CPAE 1, 3, 6)
  • Identify the different adult teaching and learning theories. (CPAE 1,2, 3, 6; NBTPS 1.2, 2.1)
  • Assess the field of adult education in a global context. (CPAE 4; NBTPS 5.1)
  • Review and analyze academic literature from various journals and books. (CPAE 6; NBTPS 4.3)
  • Evaluate the role of the adult education professional. (CPAE 3, 4; NBTPS 4.3, 5.1)
  • Apply the learning from this course in adult learning environments. (CPAE 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; NBTPS 1.2)

Alvord Reflection Paper: 125 points :  The Scalpel and The Silver Bear reading


The goal of this reflection paper is to serve as a final synthesis of your learning from ED 500 and to incorporate a cultural perspective with which you may or may not be familiar.  Consider all aspects of the course and reflect on how Dr. Alvord’s story illustrates your insights into adult learning theory and the effect your insights have on you as an adult educator.  Consider not only Dr. Alvord’s experience but the environments and contexts in which she finds herself.  There is a vast amount of material in this story – I am not looking for a recounting of the story, rather I am looking for a critical reflection of the story and environmental context in relation to adult learning and you as an adult education provider.  The paper length will depend on your insights, but to accomplish the reflection adequately I would expect a minimum of five – seven pages, (exclusive of your cover sheet and reference list), double spaced, Times New Roman, 12 point, and 1” margins.


Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

  • Field Trip Response: 10 points each - total 80 points
  • Personal Philosophy: 50 points
  • GI Bill Response: 25 points
  • Philosophy Group Analysis: 15 points each - total 105 points
  • Journal Critique - 25 points
  • Application Paper (Core Assessment): 125 points
  • Final Exam: 5 points
  • Participation: 10 points each - total 80 points
  • Grading:

    • Grades are earned, not given.
    • Each assignment is allocated points based upon the academic quality and thoroughness of the assignment, which are then added together to obtain the final letter grade. To assist you in meeting the expected grading criteria for assignments, grading rubrics are posted for all assignments including participation under the Course Home. Please pay attention to the rubrics as all the quantitative grading criteria is provided.
    • Point Grade Distribution
      A      550 – 495
      B      494 – 440
      C      439 – 385
      D      384 – 330

      F      329 - below
       

    Assignment details may be located under the Course Home AssignmentsAssignments equal 550 point

    Assignment

    Points Value

    Percentage

    GI Bill

    25

    4.55%

    Field Trips

    80

    14.55%

    Discussion

    80

    14.55%

    Group Philosophy

    105

    19.09%

    Philosophy

    50

    9.09%

    Application Paper (Core Assessment)

    125

    22.73%

    Journal Critique

    25

    4.55%

    Final

    60

    11%

    Late Submission of Course Materials:

    • In order to receive full credit for your assignments, they must be turned in on time.
    • For each day your work is late, two (2) points will be deducted. Late work will be accepted up to 5 days. After that time, you will automatically be awarded a zero.
    • I do not give extra credit.

    Classroom Rules of Conduct:

    Be prepared

    • Print out the course syllabus. Pay special attention to the course schedule, assignment due dates, and my contact information.
    • In the event of power or connectivity loss, head the closest working computer (friend, family, library, work, etc.).
    • Your participation is required.
    • If the Park email system goes down, email me at my alternate email address.
    • If Park Online goes done, make sure you still get you assignments in to me on time. Fax or email them to me.
    • Save copies of everything for yourself. I suggest that you back up to CD or an alternate server.
    • Copy yourself on emails to me. If you do not get a copy in your inbox, then I probably did not get the email.


    Email

    • Always start the subject line of all emails to me with the course number ED500. This will make sure your email goes into the correct folder and prevents them from being filtered out as junk email. Also, it will help me when searching for the email later.
    • Sign your email with your full name.

    Communication

    • All online communications should to be composed with fairness, honesty and tact.
    • Spelling and grammar are very important in an online course.
    • What you put into an online course reflects on your level of professionalism.
    • Use of American Standard English with correct grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and spelling is expected for all material submitted to the online class classroom.
    • Here are a couple of references that discuss behavior and writing online:
      http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/679/01/

      http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html

    Academic Honesty:
    Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.   Park University 2007-2008 Graduate Catalog Page 24-26

    Plagiarism:

    Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct. Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

    Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

    Park University 2007-2008 Graduate Catalog Page 24-26


    Attendance Policy:

    Professors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences in excess of four (4) class periods, in a 16-week semester (or 2, in an 8-week term) will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Dean, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified by mail that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2007-2008 Graduate Catalog Page 28

    Disability Guidelines:
    Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



    Rubric

    CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
    I. Cognitive Skills  • Explore professional insights into adult education through Dr. Alvord's or Rita's experience. • Discuss adult education course concepts/theory to explain your insights into the practice as an adult educator.                     
    Outcomes
    1. Content/Comprehension 2. Analysis 3. Synthesis 4. Evaluation  5. Application 6. Interpretation 1-6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
    Reference To Course Content

    * Uses 4 course concepts/theories to explain Dr. Alvord's or Rita's journey as an adult learner

    Insights & Application

    * Compares/contrasts 4 of Dr. Alvord's or Rita's experiences to adult education concepts/theories practice  

     
    Reference To Course Content

    * Uses 2- 3 course concepts/theories to explain Dr. Alvord's or Rita's journey as an adult learner

    Insights & Application

    * Compares/contrasts 2-3 of Dr. Alvord's or Rita's experiences to adult education concepts/theories practice  

     
    Reference To Course Content

    * Uses 1 course concept/theory to explain Dr. Alvord's or Rita's journey as an adult learner

    Insights & Application

    * Compares/contrasts 1 of Dr. Alvord's or Rita's experiences to adult education concepts/theories practice  

     
    Reference To Course Content

    * Uses no course concept/theory to explain Dr. Alvord's or Rita's journey as an adult learner

    Insights & Application

    * Does not compares/contrasts any of Dr. Alvord's or Rita's experiences to adult education concepts/theories practice  

     
    II.  Technical/Professional Skills                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
    Outcomes
    1. Academic writing skills 7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
    No grammatical errors, including APA, thesis statement clear, discussion flow is easily tracked throughout paper.  Presentation and format is correct. Four or less grammatical errors, including APA, thesis statement clear; discussion flow becomes unclear at times throughout paper.  Presentation and format is correct Five to ten grammatical errors, including APA, thesis statement clear; discussion flow becomes unclear at times throughout paper.  Presentation and format is has errors. Eleven or more grammatical errors, including APA, thesis statement clear; discussion flow becomes unclear at times throughout paper.  Presentation is not correct 

    Copyright:

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    Last Updated:1/3/2008 9:05:17 AM