Syllabus Entrance
Printer Friendly
Email Syllabus

CS 219 Programming Fundamentals
Dodge, Robert G.


Course Number: CS-219
Course Title: Principles of Programming
Instructor: Robert Dodge
E-Mail Address: Robert.G.Dodge@saic.com
dodger1922@charter.net
Term Dates: Spring II 2005
Meeting Times: Sat. 0800 - 1300
Resident Center: Scott AFB, IL

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course continues the development of the programming and problem solving skills introduced in CS 151. Programming concepts will be put into practice by using Java for programming projects. Students will learn about object-oriented programming and two of its key components - inheritance and polymorphism. Additionally, students will learn about these topics: arrays, graphical user interface components, event-driven programming, exception handling, files. Prerequisites: Any math course = MA 131 and a grade of 'C' or better in CS 151. Suggested prerequisite: CS 140.

EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY:
My educational philosophy reflects my personal beliefs and how those beliefs will be put into action in the classroom. I believe that the purpose of education is to enlighten a student with the ability to look at life in a new way. In the words of Frank Herburt, author of "Dune", "the sleeper must awaken." CS-219 is a course meant to awaken your ability to solve problems. I believe that your role will be to come to class prepared by reading the assigned material, practice the problems in the book, and discussed with your fellow students outside of class. For a student to fully benefit from a college education, they must reach beyond the boundries of the classroom to allow the subject matter to reach them on a personal level. My role will be to set achievable goals that will fairly assess your knowledge. I will encourage active participation and that students stay on pace to achieve the learning objectives. An average class, will consist of a quiz covering the previous week's material, a lecture covering new material, and a lab period to discuss the Java programming environment and upcoming programming assignments.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
1. Explain object-oriented programming concepts (this should be a quick review since OOP concepts are covered in CS 151) - classes, instance variables, instance methods, constructors
2. Explain advanced object-oriented programming concepts - inheritance, polymorphism, cloning
3. Demonstrate creativity and problem-solving skills
4. Use the JBuilder integrated development environment to enter, run, and debug Java programs
5. Debug and test Java programs
6. Write Java programs that use proper style and documentation. See link: http://captain.park.edu/ics/swResources/tutorialsAndGuidelines/javaStyleGuidelines.doc
7. Demonstrate proper use of the object-oriented principle of inheritance
8. Given a problem description, the student should be able to decide on appropriate classes in a class hierarchy tree
9. Demonstrate proper use of the object-oriented principle of composition (lecture).
10. Given a description that involves two classes, the student should be able to decide on whether composition or inheritance is more appropriate.
11. Write Java programs that use:
a. One-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays
b. Object-oriented programming concepts - inheritance, polymorphism
c. Exception handling
d. File I/O (chapter 9)
e. GUI programming - event-driven programming, layout managers, swing objects (chapter 12 & 13)

COURSE ASSESSMENT:
Quizzes, programming projects, and attendance.

GRADING:
Quizzes will be averaged for 100 points
Programming projects will be worth 100 points each
Attendance and participation worth 100 points

LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS:
Homework is assigned to ensure that all of the learning objectives are covered. The homework is Java programming. In order to meet the “creativity and problem-solving skills” learning objective, the student must not produce solutions by pasting together given code fragments. Although pasting code fragments together is sometimes appropriate, it does not enforce the development of creativity and problem solving. Homework is assigned and is due at the beginning of the class period as noted in the table below.

CLASSROOM RULES OF CONDUCT:
All reading assignments should be completed before the class period in which the assignment is to be discussed. Come to class prepared to discuss the reading assignment. Regular class meeting times will be used to discuss concepts and insights for each session's reading assignment.

COURSE TOPIC/DATES/ASSIGNMENTS/QUIZZES:
Introduction, Review, and Chapter 6 Lecture / Sat, Mar 26 2005 / No Assignment Due / No Quiz
Chapter 7 - Inheritance and Appendix 8 Lecture/ Sat, Apr 2 2005 / Chapter 6 Program / Chapter 6 Quiz
Chapter 7 (continued) and Composition Lecutre / Sat, Apr 9 2005 / No Assignment Due / No Quiz
Chapter 8 – Exceptions Lecture / Sat, Apr 16 2005 / Chapter 7 Problem Due / Chapter 7 Quiz
Chapter 9 – File I/O / Sat, Apr 23 2005 / No Assignment Due / Chapter 8 Quiz
Chapter 12 – Basic Swing Lecture / Sat, Apr 30 2005 / Chapter 9 Problem Due / Chapter 9 Quiz
Chapter 13 – Applets Lecture / Sat, May 7 2005 / No Assignment Due / Chapter 12 Quiz
Chapter 14 – More Swing Lecture / Sat, May 14 / Chapter 13 Problem Due / Chapter 13 Quiz

ACADEMIC HONESTY:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life.
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 101

There is a tendency in this course for students to share the results of their programming assignments with other members of the class before the assignments are due. This is a disservice to your fellow students. The programming assignments must be YOUR work. You may confer with fellow students about the assignment, but I caution you to complete the programming on your own. You will not be able to do well on quizzes unless you pick-up the programming techniques in this course.

PLAGIARISM:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing.
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 101
See my notes under Academic Honesty.

ATTENDANCE POLICY:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "WH".
4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
Park University 2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog Page 100

The above is Parks attendance policy, but my attendance policy is more stringent due to the nature of this course. This course will be challenging for all of the students, even those with prior programming experience. Attendance is extremely important so that the students can hear the lecture and be exposed to example Java programs during lab periods.

DISABILITY GUIDELINES:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all learners that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to learners concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding learners with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

COPYRIGHT:
This material is copyright and can not be reused without author permission.