Syllabus Entrance
Printer Friendly
Email Syllabus

EN 320 Literature for Young Adults
Dick, Linda L.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

EN 320 Literature for Young Adults

Semester

F2T 2010 DL

Faculty

Dick, Linda L.

Title

Adjunct faculty

Degrees/Certificates

Bachelor Degree English/Creative Writing, Western Michigan University
Master Degree Literature, Western Michigan University

Office Location

virtual

Office Hours

Monday 10-noon eastern standard time

Daytime Phone

269-271-0327

E-Mail

linda.dick@park.edu

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Prerequisites

none

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
The textbooks for this course are e-texts.  The links for the texts are listed within each unit of the course materials. 

Additional Resources:
none

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
EN320 Adolescent Literature: A study of literature in English appropriate for readers in grades six through twelve. Application of literary analysis and interpretation, as well as emphasis on historical and cultural context, will locate adolescent literature within the broader literary tradition. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:

Teaching Philosophy

My teaching philosophy is pretty simple. I strive to help each student I teach to reach for that elusive space outside the box; to conquer it; and claim it thus expanding each student’s ability to think critically and to move towards a new level of understanding and commitment in whatever endeavor he or she chooses – be it a new career option or a continuation of an education within the four year university. I find this philosophy especially important for non-traditional students who, for the past six plus years, have taught me the meaning of education and what it means for students from all backgrounds and walks of life. My philosophy is to help each and every one of those students reach his/her potential no matter what subject I’m teaching. To open up the world outside of the classroom, and help the student bridge from one world to another. 

Communication is a vital link in today’s fast moving cultural landscape. Helping students learn to communicate effectively in rhetorical situations prepares them for the real life scenarios played out in work and life once students complete college degrees. The English classroom is one of the places where communication skills can be honed to a fine edge. It is my belief that all students can be helped to the pinnacle of rhetorical skills with some one-on-one coaching as well as team spirited collaboration. And that is how I see myself, as a writing coach. It is my style to help each student reach the top most layer of his/her skills in communication, which will help insure success in other college work and later on in life, work for hire in the job market. I believe in a combination of individual attention and a team approach, which incorporates all the students in the classroom setting, working towards a successful portfolio of student writing. I also find the one-on-one conference sessions to be the place where I can really help make a difference in a student’s talents and abilities as a writer. My secondary philosophy therefore, is to be a helpful coach: To inspire, to instruct, but most of all, to encourage.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate a bibliographical knowledge of available adolescent literature by producing a bibliographical research paper focusing upon such literature and by sharing bibliographical knowledge orally in the classroom. (MoSTEP 1.2.1.1) (Frameworks: Knowledge 4, 7)
  2. Demonstrate their skills in teaching adolescent literature by producing a teaching package containing sufficient lesson plans for the teaching on one major work of adolescent literature and by presenting one lesson plan from that package to the class. (MoSTEP 1.2.1.1, 1.2.1.5, 1.2.3.2, 1.2.4.1, 1.2.4.2, 1.2.4.3, 1.2.5.2) (Frameworks: Knowledge 4, 6, 7, 10; Skills 5, 11, 12 13, 14; Dispositions 4)
  3. Demonstrate minimal mastery of the internet in regard to finding useful references to adolescent literature by producing an internet search project. (MoSTEP 1.2.5.1, 1.2.11.1, 1.2.11.2, 1.2.11.3, 1.2.11.4, 1.2.11.5, 1.2.11.6) (Frameworks: Knowledge 4, 7, 13; Skills 6, 11.17; Dispositions 4, 5, 6, 16)
  4. Demonstrate enriched appreciation for the variety and depth of available adolescent literature through journaling, class discussion, and examination. (MoSTEP 1.2.1.1, 1.2.8.1, 1.2.8.2, 1.2.8.3, 1.2.9.1) (Frameworks: Knowledge 4, 7; Skills 8, 17; Dispositions 2, 4, 10,
  5. Demonstrate critical knowledge of several major examples of adolescent literature through class discussion, formal oral presentation, and examination. (MoSTEP 1.1.1, 1.2.1.1, 1.2.4.1, 1.2.4.3 1.2.7.3, 1.2.9.1, 1.2.9.2) (Frameworks: Knowledge 3, 4, 5, 8, 10; Skills 8, 12, 17; Dispositions 2, 3, 4, 6, 25)


Core Assessment:

All Park University courses will include a Core Assessment with rubric. This will include ¾ of the Core Learning Outcomes listed above. The Core Assessment in this course will be a major critical paper of no fewer than 5 pages, which will include research and MLA documentation. The project will be completed in the final quarter of the term.

 The rubric for this assignment is published so the student can see the expectations.

Class Assessment:

Assessment Week Points Total
Discussion Thread Postings Weekly 5 40
Peer Discussion Response Weekly 5 40
Weekly Assignment Paper
(exception in Week Five when Prewriting subs for assignment)
Weekly 10 70
Midterm Due Week 4 30 30
Research Paper Prewriting Due Week 5 50 50
Research Paper Due Week 7 100 100
Final Week 8 75 75
Total Points 405

 

Grading:

 

Points break down
Points Grade
365 - 405 A
324 - 364 B
283 - 323 C
243 - 282 D
Less than 242 F

Late Submission of Course Materials:

The late policy is fairly simple.  Late work receives no credit.
 
The discussion thread response (answering the question) is due by Thursday midnight, CST in each week.  The deadline for peer response is Sunday midnight, CST.  The discussion thread response and peer response are a combined grade - you must have both in place in order to receive any points. Miss one part of this assignment, you will miss all the points. 
 
The Midterm has a Friday midnight due date in  week 4.
 
The Weekly Response Papers are due by midnight, CST, Sundays. 
 
In week 5, your essay prewriting is due in the Doc Share folder by Thursday, midnight, CST to allow for peer review - which is due by Sunday of the same week, CST.
 
The Research Essay has a Sunday, midnight CST due date in week 7.
 
The Final Exam has a final due date of CST midnight on Sunday of week 8. 
 
Each week in the course is set up on an open and close calendar.  The week closes and locks after Sunday night, and the next week opens up.  All Discussion Threads are locked at the end of the week.  Therefore posting to these threads after the lock down will not be allowed. 
 
If you know in advance that you are going to miss a particular deadline, complete your work early.  You can ask me to open up/unlock any week of the course ahead of time to allow for early submission of work. 
 
In the event that the student and the instructor make prior arrangements for an extension of a due date ahead of time, there will be no loss of points for work being submitted late.  The extension will only be granted ahead of time, not after the fact, and will only be granted in the event of an emergency.  Only one extension per student will be tolerated within the semester.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Professional attitude and deportment are expected in the classroom.  This includes professionalism within the discussion thread postings.  Proper grammar and spelling will be adhered to.  Cell phone texting methods of abbreviations will not be tolerated.  The use of proper capitalization in words such as "I" will be properly maintained throughout the course.  Lack of attention to the grammatically correct form of written communication will result in a loss of points for the discussion thread assignments.  

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Course Schedule

Weekly Coursework

WEEK ONE: Defining Adolescent Literature and Identifying its Elements

Reading Assignments

Reminder: When accessing About.com sites, click on "turn off this top frame" to do away with the annoying advertisements. TITLE

AUTHOR

Location/Source

Introduction

"Young Adult Fairy Talesfor the New Age: Francesca Lia Block's The Rose and the Beast."

David Russell

Locate in Park University’s library online database EBSCOhost

"Briar Rose"

Brothers Grimm

http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/~spok/grimmtmp/039.txt

"Guardians of the Fairy Tale: the Brothers Grimm"

Thomas O’Neill

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/grimm/article.html

Excerpt from "UNCLE REMUS and BRER RABBIT"

Joel Chandler Harris

See Lecture Three

The Adventures of Peter Rabbit

Beatrix Potter

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14304/14304-h/14304-h.htm

"Young Adult Literature: What Is Young Adult Literature?"

Chris Crowe

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

"Once Upon a Time"

Beth Wright

Locate in Park University’s library online database EBSCO Host

"Fantasy: Why kids read it, why kids need it"

Tamora Pierce

Locate in Park University’s library online database EBSCO Host

Discussion: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a response to a discussion topic of your choice in the online classroom. Select a different topic for each week. Peer Response: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a peer response, selecting a different peer each week.

Assignment: Complete the written assignment, as directed.

 
WEEK TWO: Understanding the Hero’s Journey/Quest Plot in Adolescent Literature
Proctored Final Form will open Monday or Tuesday of week two. Fill out the form, submit the form for approval. The confirmation email for an approved proctor site needs to be in your instructor’s mail box by Monday of week 3.
Reading Assignments TITLE
AUTHOR
Location/Source
Introduction
The Wind in the Willows
Kenneth Grahame
http://etext.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/GraWind.html
"The Hero as a Visitor in Hell"
Antonio, Sánchez-Escalonilla
Locate in Park University’s library online database EBSCO Host
"The Poet Who Sings Through Us: Homer’s Influence in Contemporary Western Culture"
Scott Belsky
Locate in Park University’s library online database EBSCO Host
"Mortal Leadership in Homer’s Odyssey"
J Patrick Dobel
Locate in Park University’s library online database EBSCO Host
"Toad’s Syndrome: Addiction to Joy Riding"
Andrew J. McBride
Locate in Park University’s library online database EBSCO Host

Discussion: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a response to a discussion topic of your choice in the online classroom. Select a different topic for each week. Peer Response: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a peer response, selecting a different peer each week.

Assignment: Complete the written assignment, as directed.

WEEK THREE: Poetry for Adolescents

Reading Assignments TITLE

AUTHOR

Location/Source

Introduction

"Daddy"

Sylvia Plath

http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15291

"Blood"

Naomi Shihab Nye

http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/16411

Note: Discussion and Peer Response postings topics vary from the established pattern.

Discussion: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a response to a discussion topic of your choice in the online classroom. Select a different topic for each week. Peer Response: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a peer response, selecting a different peer each week.

Assignment: Complete the written assignment, as directed.

WEEK FOUR: Definitive American Adolescent Literature

Reading Assignments TITLE

AUTHOR

Location/Source

Introduction

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Mark Twain

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/76

"How Classics Create an Aliterate Society"

Donald R. Gallo

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

"The Lonesomeness of Huckleberry Finn"

Paul Schacht

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

"Society and conscience in Huckleberry Finn"

Leo B. Levy

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

"The Role of Folklore in Huckleberry Finn"

Ray W. Frantz, Jr.

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

"Racism and Huckleberry Finn: Censorship, Dialogue and Change"

Alice Carey Webb

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

"Why Huckleberry Finn is not the Great American

William van O’Connor

Locate in Park University’s library

 

Midterm: Please select any two (2) discussion prompts from the list (locataed on the Midterm instrution link in the menu under Week Four) to which you respond in 250-350 words. Type the prompt at the top of your response page. Please place your name at the top of each page. You may use any sources that have been used during the course. Do NOT cut and paste any information. Be careful to cite correctly and supply a properly MLA formatted works cited list for any materials from which you quote or paraphrase. (15 points each for a total of 30 points)

Your paper is due in the dropbox by midnight CST on Friday. (Please note this deviates from the traditional Sunday night due date.)

Discussion: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a response to a discussion topic of your choice in the online classroom. Select a different topic for each week. Peer Response: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a peer response, selecting a different peer each week.

Assignment: Complete the written assignment, as directed.

WEEK FIVE: War in Adolescent Literature

Reading Assignments TITLE

AUTHOR

Location/Source

Introduction

The Red Badge of Courage

Stephen Crane

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/73

"Teaching the Red Badge of Courage"

William McColly

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

"Symbolism and

John J. McDermott

Locate in Park University’s library online

 

Note: Peer Response postings topics vary this week from the established pattern. Research essay introductory paragraph, outline, and works cited are due into Doc Sharing by midnight on Thursday. Be sure to select "YES" under the Share column so your peers may access your prewriting.

A. Discussion: Participate in this week’s discussion by responding to one of the points.

B. Peer Response: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting your response to a peer research essay prewriting by addressing the following in complete sentences in paragraph form:

State the topic and the thesis.

Is the main idea (thesis) clear?

Are enough support paragraphs included?

Are enough quotations included for each support paragraph?

Are enough examples included for each support paragraph?

Are enough sources included?

Does the MLA format appear to be correct?

Does the prewriting contain mechanical errors? ©2009 Park University, All Rights Reserved Last Updated 2/23/2009 This content may not be reproduced without permission Page 8 of 11

What challenges might your peer face?

What suggestions do you have for your peer?

Assignment: Research Essay Prewriting Components: An introductory paragraph with an underlined thesis statement (you will NOT underline in your finished essay); an outline that includes all support paragraphs and a conclusion paragraph; a works cited list.

WEEK SIX: Horror Literature for Adolescents

Reading Assignments TITLE

AUTHOR

Location/Source

Introduction

"The Legend of Sleepy Hollow"

Washington Irving

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/41

"The Cask of Amontillado"

Edgar Allen Poe

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/2148

"The Tell Tale Heart"

Edgar Allen Poe

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/2148

"Rappaccini’s Daughter"

Nathaniel Hawthorne

http://www.shsu.edu/~eng_wpf/authors/Hawthorne/Rappaccini.htm

"The Nature of Horror"

Noël Carroll

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

"Beatrice Rappaccini: a Victim of Male Love and Horror"

Richard Brenzo

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

"Mind the Gap: Building Bridges between Adolescent Readers and Texts"

Lois T. Stover

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

 

Discussion: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a response to a discussion topic of your choice in the online classroom. Select a different topic for each week.

Peer Response: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a peer response, selecting a different peer each week.

Assignment: Complete the written assignment, as directed.

WEEK SEVEN: The Ironic Quest in Adolescent Literature

Reading Assignments TITLE

AUTHOR

Location/Source

Introduction

The Heart of Darkness

Joseph Conrad

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/219

"Make Friends with Horror and Terror: Apocalypse Now"

Saul Steier

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

"Decentering Heart of Darkness"

Perry Meisel

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

"Conrad's Critique of Imperialism in Heart of Darkness"

Hunt Hawkins

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

"Some Polish Literary Motifs in the Works of Joseph Conrad"

Adam Gillon and Joseph Conrad

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

 

Note: Discussion and Peer Response postings topics vary this week from the established pattern. Research essay is due into the drop box by midnight on Sunday.

Discussion: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a response to a discussion topic of your choice in the online classroom. Peer Response: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a peer response, selecting a different peer each week.

Assignment: Complete the written assignment, as directed.

WEEK EIGHT: Fantasy and Adolescent Readers

Reading Assignments TITLE

AUTHOR

Location/Source

Introduction

The Adventures of Alice in Wonderland

Lewis Carroll

http://www.sabian.org/alice.htm

"Alice’s Invasion of Wonderland"

James R. Kincaid

Locate in Park University’s library online database JSTOR

Discussion: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a response to a discussion topic of your choice in the online classroom. Select a different topic for each week. Peer Response: Participate in this week’s discussion by posting a peer response, selecting a different peer each week.

Assignment: Complete the written assignment, as directed.

 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog Page 92

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog Page 92-93

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: An attendance report of "P" (present) will be recorded for students who have logged in to the Online classroom at least once during each week of the term. Recording of attendance is not equivalent to participation. Participation grades will be assigned by each instructor according to the criteria in the Grading Policy section of the syllabus.

Park University 2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95-96

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright
                               and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:10/9/2010 10:46:09 AM