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CA 322 Theory & History of Mass Media
Lofflin, John


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

CA322 Theory and History of the Mass Media

Semester

FA 2010 HO

Faculty

Lofflin, John

Title

Professor of journalism

Degrees/Certificates

MA

Office Location

Copley 1 South

Office Hours

8-10 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday; Wednesday 1-5 p.m. Friday by appointment

Daytime Phone

816-584-6327

E-Mail

john.lofflin@park.edu

Class Days

TR

Class Time

11:35 a.m. - 12:50 p.m.

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

“Mass Media and American Politics,” Doris Graber

“Amusing Ourselves to Death,” Neil Postman

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

Assorted readings available in doc sharing

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:

Analysis of mass media content and the role media play in modern society. The course includes study of the history of that role, functions of the media, effects on society, and the persuasive abilities of media. This course focuses on contemporary media criticism and related ethical issues. 3:0:3 (From catalog 2010-2011)

Educational Philosophy:
Engagement with the ideas of the course is the essential prerequisite for higher level learning. The teacher serves as a guide to the construction of meaning, the development of skills and dispositions, the recognition of what constitutes excellence, and the consideration of ethical issues. Reading and writing are essential tools to achieve depth of understanding and criticism. Learning to question is the central work of a learning environment and will be the key method of the course.

Method:

The dominant method of the course will be reading and inquiry. I will cast as much of the material as I can in the form of questions… and I have many. Here are some underlying thoughts about the subjects of the course in the form of questions:

 

ÿ        Is “mass media” the proper term for the American news and entertainment complex or would “massive media” be more explanatory?

ÿ        Do the American media still create a marketplace of ideas?

ÿ        Does it present any ideas at all?

ÿ        How does information exchange work? How is meaning derived?

ÿ        How has the Internet changed the way professional communicators communicate?

ÿ        Has it changed how they communicate?

ÿ        What does the addition of non-professional or non-commercial communicators, through the Web, mean to the mix of ideas and information available in communities today?

ÿ        What is news?

ÿ        What is the public agenda?

ÿ        What is not on the public agenda?

ÿ        Are community interests served in the contemporary symbolic environment?

ÿ        What is the power of the media in the current political environment?

ÿ        Others.

 

The rough agenda for the course will begin with explanation of the ways the news media go about their business. We will ask about their role in society, what criteria they use for news, the complimentary processes of gatekeeping and agenda setting. One important proposition of the course is that language matters so we will look at how the choices media professionals make may affect viewers, readers and the political environment.

 

In the second section we will turn to the seminal work of Neil Postman. By reading Amusing Ourselves to Death we will begin to ask questions about what effects television has had on society. We will expand these questions to include the World Wide Web. You will want to begin reading this book a little at a time from the beginning of the course so you will be ready for the discussion around midterm.

 

In the final sections, we will pull all this material together as we build our content analysis research project. We will code a media message, analyze the results, speculate on the effects utilizing media and learning theory and prepared a report of the findings. This will close the semester. A final reaction paper pulling everything together will be due at the time reserved for the final exam.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. You will use the vocabulary of communication studies confidently and accurately.
  2. You will utilize communication theories to analyze current situations in society and politics. During the fall 2005 semester we will focus on coverage of the conflict in Iraq.
  3. You will weave an enhanced understanding of how the press works and how people learn from it into your personal analysis of the symbolic environment. You will demonstrate a new understanding of the limits and powers of the press.
  4. You will mark the development of communication vehicles since 1900 with changes in presidential politics, combining the new media vehicles with the times in which they dominate.
  5. You will accomplish original research in the form of content analysis of some facet of the symbolic environment, and analyze that research to show understanding of the environment.
  6. You will critique theories about the effects of television on the symbolic environment.
  7. The nature of the symbolic environment will become transparent for you; you will use this understanding to analyze modern communications. You will be dedicated to improving that environment.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. 1) Discuss and reflect on how the process of creating media content across platforms contributes to the nature of the message. 2) Discuss, analyze and reflect on the nature of the current media/symbolic environment. 3) Discuss and reflect on the effect of television on the symbolic environment. Initiate discussion of the effect of the Web on the symbolic environment.  4) Analyze and critique the content of media messages utilizing media research methods and theory. 5) Predict the effects of media content on society utilizing media effects theory and learning theory. 6) Design, execute, explain and analyze original research in the capstone content analysis project. 7) Apply principles of media analysis to other forms of public communication. 8) Discuss and question definitions of key concepts, including: ? Mass media ? News media content ? Bias ? Objectivity/balance ? Social responsibility in journalism and entertainment ? Effects of public communication ? The public agenda and how it comes to be ? The First Amendment and how the media fit into an open society
Core Assessment:

The core assessment will be the content analysis project done individually by students.  Specifically, the content analysis paper is a three-page paper that should include: 1) a description of the theoretical framework of the message, 2) a description of how the codes and categories of codes in your code sheet relate to the theoretical framework of your study,  3) a description of the method of your study, 4) your preliminary conclusion and whether or not it was supported by the evidence,  5) significance of the study, and 6) suggestions for future research based on the study. 

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
 

 

Total points – 520 points

Assignments:

 Points possibe

Midterm reaction paper

100 points

Postman reaction paper

100 points

Content Analysis report of findings

200 points

Final comprehensive reaction paper

100 points

Spot quizzes (10 points each)

 @50  points

 

 

Quality of writing will be a factor in all evaluations  

Total

@550 points

Suggested letter grade scale
Percentage Points  Letter Grade 
90%-100% 468-520

A

80%-89%

416-467

B

70%-79%

364-415

C

60%-69%

312-363

D

below 60%

  0 -311 

F


 

Grading:
 

Suggested grading scale:

Percentage Points  Letter Grade 
90%-100% 468-520

A

80%-89%

416-467

B

70%-79%

364-415

C

60%-69%

312-363

D




Late Submission of Course Materials:


This course is based on reading. You cannot succeed without reading the material, reading it carefully, and taking notes on what you have read. Simply monitoring the discussion will not be nearly enough -- citations from the material are required in every evaluation and you cannot reach successful depth of understanding without reading. Please let me know if you are having trouble understanding the material. You will probably not be alone and you will provide me a clear opportunity to help all the students engage with the ideas.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

ATTENDANCE:

             It is not possible to do well in this course without regular attendance. Much of the material for papers will only be discussed in class. Interaction of students with the material in class is vital to learning and performance. The instructor will keep attendance. The attendance policy of the college requires students who miss more than two weeks, six consecutive sessions, to be dropped. The instructor will adhere to that policy.

             The instructor may chose to lower a student’s overall grade if the student misses more than six sessions during the semester.

             Success of the content analysis project will depend heavily on the attendance and faithful work of each student in the class. Please do not miss any sessions during the period reserved for work on the project.

             The instructor will probably make changes in the agenda and the evaluation materials in this class. The progress of the class in general and our interaction with events in the media may speed up or slow down our journey through the material. I am far more interested in what you understand than in what we “cover.” Important note: Staying abreast of changes is your responsibility. If you are absent when these changes are announced, it will be up to you to find out and to catch up.

             The instructor will provide handout materials only once. If you are absent when these materials are circulated, it will be your responsibility to obtain them from other students or from the catch-all box outside the instructor’s door.

 

A NOTE ON PLAGIARISM:

             Plagiarism is when you use someone else’s words without attribution. It is, in simple terms, theft of another person’s work. Downloading material from the Web and passing it off as your own without quote marks or attribution is a common form of plagiarism today. Also, quoting from the text without attribution is plagiarism. I will not quibble about definitions. Plagiarism is not a bad choice; it is theft. If you steal someone else’s work and attempt to pass it off as your own, you will receive an F for the assignment and not be allowed to make it up.

             Similarly, if you turn in work you didn’t do, that is cheating and you will receive an F for the assignment with no chance of making it up. Again, downloading material from the Web and passing it off as your own is a modern temptation; no matter how efficient it seems to you; it will be considered cheating in this class. It is not difficult these days for the instructor to find out if you have downloaded material and attempted to pass it off as your own or if you have purchased a paper on the Web (It will generally not fit the topic very closely...). Expect an F with no possibility of make up if you attempt such a stunt.

             If you have any questions about whether you are stealing someone’s words or cheating, ask me before you turn in the paper and we will consider the situation together.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

Tentative Schedule:

 

  • Week 1: August 16/18         Introduction to the course
  • Week 2: August 23/25         Graber on Laswell’s topology; roles of journalism, role of public

relations, broadcasting, print, Web

  • Week 3: Aug. 30/Sept. 1     Graber on roles the media play in a variety of political regimes: a

global perspective; how the media is organized; traditional principles of journalism like objectivity and balance 

  • Week 4: Sept. 6/8                 Criteria journalist use to answer the most important question in the

course: What is news? Apply these criteria to the Web for comparison and discussion.

  • Week 5: Sept. 13/15             The key process of gatekeeping. Has it changed in the modern

environment?

  • Week 6: Sept. 20/22             Agenda Setting Theory (Reaction paper, 100 pts., due Sept. 27)
  • Week 7: Sept. 27/29             Postman
  • Week 8: Oct. 4/6                   Postman
  • Fall Break
  • Week 9: Oct. 18/20               Postman (Reaction paper, 100 pts., due Oct. 25)
  • Week 10: Oct. 25/27             What is content analysis?
  • Week 11: Nov. 1/3                Proposals for your original research project
  • Week 12: Nov. 8/10              Begin coding
  • Week 13: Nov. 15/17            Finish coding
  • Week 14: Nov. 22 The content report of findings assigned and discussed (Report, 200 pts.,

due Nov. 28-30)

  • Thanksgiving
  • Week 15: Nov. 29/30            Wrap up report of findings (Comprehensive final reaction paper, 100

pts., due during the period reserved for the final exam

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93
Be extra careful about downloading material from the Internet. Downloading is so easy we sometimes forget we do not own the material we access. It is simple to credit the source, so do it. It is best to put the material into your own words. I take this seriously. I consider any material you use without credit plagiarism and will deal with it harshly.

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 96

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

Bibliography:

Books you may be interested in for further reading:

 

·    Adler, Richard, editor, Understanding Television, (Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers Inc., 1981).

·    Arlen, Michael, The View From Highway 1: Essays on Television, (Syracuse University Press, 1997).

·    Barber, James David Ed., Race for the Presidency: The Media and the Nominating Process, (Prentice Hall.1978).

·    Borjesson, Kristina, Ed., Feet to the Fire: The Media after 9/11, (Amherst, New York, Prometheus Books, 2005).

·    Campbell, Converse, Miller, Stokes, The American Voter, (John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1964).

·    Edelman, Murray, Constructing the Political Spectacle, (Chicago, University of Chicago Press,1988)

·    Graber, Doris A., Processing the News: How People Tame the Information Tide, Second Edition, (New York, Longman, Inc., 1988).

·    Graber, Doris A., Media Power in Politics, Congressional Quarterly Inc., 1990)

·    Graber, Doris A., Processing the News: How People Tame the Information Tide (Congressional Quarterly, 1994).

·    Jackson II, John S. and Crotty, William, The Politics of Presidential Selection, (New York, Longman, Inc., 1996).

·    Jackson, Brooks and Hall Jamieson, Kathleen, Un-Spun: Finding Facts in a world of disinformation, (New York: Random House, 2007

·    Krippendorff, Klaus, Content Analysis: An Introduction to its Methodology, (Sage Publications, Inc., 1980).

·    Lakoff, George and Johnson, Mark, Metaphors We Live By, (Chicago, University Of Chicago Press, 1980).

·    Loomis, Burdett, and Alan Cigler. 2002. Interest Group Politics, 6th ed. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press.

·    Loomis, Burdett, and Darrell West. 1998. The Sound of Money: How Political Interests Get What They Want. New York: W. W. Norton.

·    McCombs, Maxwell, Setting the Agenda: The Mass Media and Public Opinion (Cambridge, UK, Polity Press, 2004)

·    Merritt, Davis "Buzz", and McCombs, Maxwell E., The Two W's of Journalism: The Why and What of Public Affairs Reporting (Lea's Communication Series, 2003).

·    Patterson, Thomas E. and McClure, Robert D., The Unseeing Eye: The Myth of Television Power in National Elections, (New York: Putnam's, 1976).

·    Schlozman, Kay. 2002. "Citizen Participation in America: What Do We Know? Why Do We Care?" Political Science: The State of the Discipline. Ira Katznelson and Helen Milner, eds. New York and Washington, D.C.: W. W. Norton and the American Political Science Association.

·    Wadsworth, Barry, Piaget’s Theory Of Cognitive Development, (New York: Longman, Inc., 1979).

 

Articles of interest on the subject:

 

·    Apollonio, D. E., and Raymond J. La Raja. 2004. "Who Gave Soft Money? The Effect of Interest Group Resources on Political Contributions." Journal of Politics 66: 4 (November).

·    Benoit, William L., Stein, Kevin A. and Hansen, Glenn J., “New York Times Coverage of Presidential Campaigns,” Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Vol. 82, No. 2, Summer 2005, pgs. 356-376.

·    Buchanan, Mark, “The Assault on ‘The Assault’,” New York Times, May 31, 2007.

·    Buchanan, Mark, “A New Silent Majority,” New York Times, May 23, 2007.

·    Bumiller, Elisabeth, “Keepers of Bush Image Lift Stagecraft to New Heights,” New York Times, May 16, 2003.

·    Cigler, Allan, and Mark R. Joslyn. 2002. "The Extensiveness of Group Membership and Social Capital: The Impact on Political Tolerance Attitudes." Political Research Quarterly (March).

·    Cohen, Patricia. “Thinking Cap: The Zoot Suit: Statement of Style or Protest?” New York Times, July 5, 2011.

·    Crampton, Thomas, “The Democratic Vice Presidential Nominee After Speeding by Kansans, Edwardses Return to Rally” New York Times, Aug. 9, 2004.

·    Foer, Franklin, “The Source of the Trouble,” New York Times Magazine, June 7, 2004.

·    Iyengar , Shanto, Luskin, Robert C. and Fishkin, James S., “Deliberative Preferences in the Presidential Nomination Campaign: Evidence from an Online Deliberative Poll,” (research paper, The Center for Deliberative Democracy, 2005), 4, http://cdd.stanford.edu/research/index.html.

·    Kurtz, Howard. “Weekly Reader Puffing for Tobacco? Study Says Kids' Publication Swayed by Industry Ties.” The Washington Post  [FINAL Edition], Nov. 2, 1995.

·    Luther, Catherine A. and Miller, M. Marki, “Framing of the 2003 U.S.-Iraq War Demonstrations: An Analysis of News and Partisan Texts,” Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Vol. 82, No. 1, Spring 2005, 78-96.

·    McCombs, Maxwell, “The Agenda-Setting Role of the Mass Media in the Shaping of Public Opinion,” http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/dps/extra/McCombs.pdf

·    Nagourney, Adam, “Political Parties Shift Emphasis to Core Voters,” New York Times, Sept. 1, 2003.

·    Newman, Maria, “Bush Continues to Push His Credentials for War on Terror,” New York Times, May 14, 2004.

·    Newport, Frank and Moore, David W., “Final Poll Shows Presidential Race to Be Dead Heat, Bush 49%, Kerry 49%, Nader 1%”, Gallup News Service, Nov. 1, 2004.

·    Okrent, Daniel, “The Public Editor: Weapons of Mass Destruction? Or Mass Distraction?” New York Times, May 30, 2004.

·    Piper-Aiken, Kimmerly S., “How Election Stories Both Empower and Exclude Women Viewers,” Submitted for presentation at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Kansas City, July 30 - August 2, 2003.

·    Project for Excellence in Journalism, "In the Public Interest? A Content Study of Early Press Coverage of the 2000 Presidential Campaign," http://www.journalism.org/electionfeb.html

·    Purnick, Joyce, “FORAGING FOR VOTES: One-Doorbell-One-Vote Tactic Re-emerges in Bush-Kerry Race” New York Times, April 6, 2004.

·    Rosenberry, Jack, “Few Papers Use Online Techniques to Improve Public Communication,” Newspaper Research Journal, Vol. 26, No. 4, Fall 2005, 61-73.

·    Rozell, Mark, and Clyde Wilcox. Interest Groups in American Campaigns. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press.

·    Rutenberg, Jim And Zernike, Kate, “Accusers All: Going Negative: When It Works,” New York Times, Aug. 22, 2004.

·    Stanley, Alessandra, “TV WATCH On Cable, a Fog of Words About Kerry's War Record,” New York Times, Aug. 24, 2004

·    The Editors, “The Times and Iraq: A Sample of the Coverage,” New York Times, May 30, 2004.

·    U.S. Newswire, “Prominent Journalists and Citizens Criticize Media Coverage of Iraq Disarmament and War Preparations” New York Times, March 4, 2003.

·    Weaver, David and Drew, Dan, “Voter Learning and Interest in the 2000 Presidential Election: Did the Media Matter?” Journalism and Mass Media Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 4 Winter 2001.



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1,2,3,5,7 Depending on the project, objective 6 may be added                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Content of the 'A' question shows exceptional depth of thought as the student applies the material to a new situation. Student researcher makes connections between theories and the results of the content analysis.  Writing shows organization and is thematic as the student reaches a conclusion about the findings and their application to media messages in society then develops an argument to bolster that conclusion. Student researcher expresses considered value judgments about her conclusions. Student identifies a purpose for this research for the good of the community or uses the material to criticize the media in fulfilling its role(s) in society. -- All of these elements are present in an excellent content analysis project Student chooses not to write the  'A' paper. Student researcher makes connections between theories and the results of the content analysis. Writing shows organization and is thematic as the student reaches a conclusion about the findings and their application to media messages in society then develops an argument to bolster that conclusion. Student researcher expresses considered value judgments about her conclusions. Student identifies a purpose for this research for the good of the community or uses the material to criticize the media in fulfilling its role(s) in society. -- All of these elements are present in an excellent content analysis project No 'A' paper. Student researcher makes connections between theories and the results of the content analysis. Writing is not clearly organized. Student does not reach a clear conclusion about the findings and their application to media messages in society or the conclusion does not reflect the research outcome. Student identifies a purpose for this research for the good of the community or uses the material to criticize the media in fulfilling its role(s) in society. Project does not sort a media message. Code sheet does not reflect issues in media effects. Writing is not clear enough to understand. No conclusions drawn from the work. Work is incomplete or inadequate in amount. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1,2,3,5,6,7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
Student researcher uses content analysis data to reach conclusions about media messages. Student speculates about the potential effects of these messages, yet notes theoretical limitations in the context of predicting effects. Writing shows these connections clearly and thematically. -- Both of these elements are present in an excellent content analysis project. Student researcher uses content analysis data to reach conclusions about media messages. Student speculates about the potential effects of these messages, but my not clearly describe theoretical limitations in the context of predicting effects. Writing shows these connections clearly and thematically. Student researcher uses content analysis data to reach conclusions about media messages but the conclusions are not clearly stated and are not well supported by the evidence. Speculation about the potential effects of these messages lacks theoretical grounding or is not present., Limitations are not described. Writing lacks organization. The project failed to produce evidence because the student did not conceptualize an appropriate media study or did not execute it. 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
1,2,3,5,6,7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
Student researcher is critical of theories, content analysis method or results. Student identifies limitations of the study. Student notices possible disconnect between data, theory and reality. Writing clearly explains this critique. -- Recognition of any of these elements constitutes an excellent content analysis project in the category of evaluation. Student researcher is critical of theories, content analysis method or results. Student identifies limitations of the study. Student notices possible disconnect between data, theory and reality. Writing clearly explains this critique. -- Recognition of any of these elements constitutes an excellent content analysis project in the category of evaluation. Student does not choose to write the 'A' paper so evaluation is not evidenced on that question. Little or no evaluation of the theories, method or media message is evident. The project failed to produce evidence because the student did not conceptualize an appropriate media study or did not execute it. Any evaluation is not grounded in theory or message sorting. 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
The excellent 'A' paper is present. Vocabulary of the theoretical concepts is present and used to explain the content analysis data and predictions. Commonsense explanations without specific vocabulary are fine as long as they clearly show understanding of the concepts. Question: Did the researcher understand the nature of content analysis, the nature of media messages and the nature of symbols in that message? Vocabulary of the theoretical concepts is present and used to explain the content analysis data and predictions. Commonsense explanations without specific vocabulary are fine as long as they clearly show understanding of the concepts. Question: Did the researcher understand the nature of content analysis, the nature of media messages and the nature of symbols in that message? Some vocabulary is evident and is used with understanding. Commonsense explanations without specific vocabulary are fine as long as they clearly show understanding of the concepts The project failed to produce evidence because the student did not conceptualize an appropriate media study or did not execute it. Serious lack of the vocabulary of media studies is evident. 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1,2,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
The excellent 'A' paper is present. The concepts listed in the project assignment directions appear in the paper and seem to be used competently. As long as the concepts are clear, specific vocabulary is not necessary. Question: Did the student researcher understand the linkage between the theories we studied and the findings of the content analysis he or she completed? The concepts listed in the project assignment directions appear in the paper and seem to be used competently. As long as the concepts are clear, specific vocabulary is not necessary. Question: Did the student researcher understand the linkage between the theories we studied and the findings of the content analysis he or she completed? The  most fundamental concepts of content analysis are present and the study does aim at an appropriate media message but their presentation is not clear or thematic. The project failed to produce evidence because the student did not conceptualize an appropriate media study or did not execute it. Inability to conceptualize an appropriate project is evidence the concepts have not been understood. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1,2,3,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
The excellent 'A' paper is present. The important element here is that the student developed a doable content analysis. The code sheet should illustrate understanding of media messages, symbols, theories, and concepts, The findings should use these elements with a good degree of fidelity. In semesters where the code sheet is developed by the class as a whole, the important element is a demonstration of the method and the codes as they relate to the project, evident in the explanation the student provides of the study. The important element here is that the student developed a doable content analysis. The code sheet should illustrate understanding of media messages, symbols, theories, and concepts, The findings should use these elements with a good degree of fidelity. In semesters where the code sheet is developed by the class as a whole, the important element is a demonstration of the method and the codes as they relate to the project, evident in the explanation the student provides of the study. The project was not well conceived so the conclusion are sketchy or non-existent but the project was completed. The code sheet illustrates modest understanding of the nature of symbols, theories, and concepts, in other words, the elements of the code sheet could be identified in a media message. The project failed to produce evidence because the student did not conceptualize an appropriate media study or did not execute it. Inability to conceptualize or design an appropriate project is evidence the concepts have not been understood. 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
1,2,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
The excellent 'A' paper is present. The student completed the content analysis, worked through the evidence and drew conclusions about the message. Those conclusions were supported by theoretical concepts. The student critiqued both the study and the media and noted limitations. The student completed the content analysis, worked through the evidence and drew conclusions about the message. Those conclusions were supported by theoretical concepts. The student critiqued both the study and the media and noted limitations. The student completed the content analysis, worked through the evidence and drew conclusions about the message. Those conclusions were  supported by theoretical concepts but the description was not clear or thematic and the concepts may have been misapplied in some cases.. The student critiqued both the study and the media and noted limitations but the critique was not well organized and did not contain sufficient depth in terms of considering a complex array of possibilities. The project failed to produce evidence because the student did not conceptualize an appropriate media study or did not execute it. Inability to conceptualize or design an appropriate project is evidence the concepts have not been understood. 
Component                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1,2,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
The excellent 'A' paper is present The individual components of the project -- completion of the study, writing quality, citations to the material, engagement with the work -- are detailed in the individual criteria at each level. They are organically linked to evaluation on each level and not considered separately. The individual components of the project -- completion of the study, writing quality, citations to the material, engagement with the work -- are detailed in the individual criteria at each level. They are organically linked to evaluation on each level and not considered separately. The individual components of the project -- completion of the study, writing quality, citations to the material, engagement with the work -- are detailed in the individual criteria at each level. They are organically linked to evaluation on each level and not considered separately. The project failed to produce evidence because the student did not conceptualize an appropriate media study or did not execute it. Inability to conceptualize or design an appropriate project is evidence the concepts have not been understood. 
M/LL or Graduate                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
1,2,3,5,7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
The excellent 'A' paper is present. By nature, the project is cross disciplinary, topical and represents original research. Completion of the project is evidence of Liberal Learnings outcomes. By nature, the project is cross disciplinary, topical and represents original research. Completion of the project is evidence of Liberal Learnings outcomes. By nature, the project is cross disciplinary, topical and represents original research. Completion of the project is evidence of Liberal Learnings outcomes. Because the project failed to produce appropriate evidence or analysis, the student did not accomplish the goals of a course designated liberal learning. 

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Last Updated:8/19/2011 1:07:03 PM