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EDU 375 Exceptional Children
Royal, Corinne E.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

EDU 375 Exceptional Children

Semester

FA 2010 HO

Faculty

Royal, Corinne E.

Title

Instructor/Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

BS Elementary Education/Special Education EMR
MA Elementary Education
Ed Spec. Curriculum & Instruction/Behavior Disorders

Office Location

Copley 317

Office Hours

By appointment

E-Mail

corinne.royal@park.edu

croyal@kc.rr.com

Semester Dates

Aug. 16- Dec. 9, 2010

Class Days

-M-----

Class Time

12:00 - 2:30 PM

Prerequisites

PS101 Introduction to Psychology OR EDU203 Educational Psychology, and Admission to the School for Education.  To be taken simultaneously with Practicum 360B.

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
  Heward, W. 2009. Exceptional Children, an Introduction to Special Education (9th ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, Pearson Education Inc. ISBN 0-13-500898-0

             Note: Students are encouraged to use resource materials (e.g. "Chapter at a Glance", "Essential concepts", "Guided Review", "Web Links") provided by the author and publisher, which may be accessed at www.prenhall.com/heward.

Tomlinson, C.A. 2005. The differentiated Classroom; responding to the needs of all learners. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. ISBN # 0-13-119502-6.

Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. 2005. Individual Education Program (IEP).  Retrieved from http://dese.mo.gov/divspeced/Compliance/IEP/Index.htm
            Students are responsible for making themselves a copy of Missouri's Individual Education program (full version - 15 pages)

Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. 2004. Regulation III identification and evaluation, found in Missouri State Plan for Special Education (17 pages), which may be accessed at the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) website.
 

Required: All Park University teacher candidates seeking certification and licensure must purchase Foliotek, the School for Education’s electronic portfolio system. As purchasing and accessing Foliotek is a multi-step process, please follow these instructions: 

1.      Decide the Contract Period and fee for which you will be paying. Minimally, you must purchase a contract which extends to the year you expect to graduate, however some students purchase a contract extending one year beyond graduation. 

 Contract Period    

 Contract Fee Per Student

 1 year

 $30.00

 2 years

 $59.00

 3 years

 $87.00

 4 years

 $112.00

 5 years

$120.00

6 years

$125.00

2.      Send an email to Carol Williams (cwilliams@park.edu) with the following information:

1.      Your Name

2.      The Contract Period you wish to purchase

3.      Your student identification number

3.      Within a few days, you will receive from Foliotek an email with online purchasing information. Upon receipt of this email, purchase your Foliotek contract.

4.      Upon receipt of your payment, you will receive your login information. You must then send a final email to Carol Williams (cwilliams@park.edu), requesting she provide your current education professors and a academic advisor (list them) access to view your portfolio. It is imperative you complete this final step!!

Recommended Text (not required):

For middle & secondary students*

Tomlinson, C.A. & Eidson, C.C., 2003. Differentiation in Practice: a resource guide for differentiating curriculum, grades 5-9.  Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. ISBN #:978-0-87120-655-8.

NOTE: See http://captain.park.edu/education/Resources/resources.htm for general information about APA guidelines.

 


Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:
See ecompanion for additional websites, readings and rubrics for assignments.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.

http://www.dese.mo.gov
http://cec.org

Course Description:
EDU375 Exceptional Children: A course designed to study the varied educational developmental, and behavioral characteristics of children with special intellectual,physical, emotional, or social needs. This course includes completion of out-of-class experiences such as visits to inclusion classrooms in area schools, and home visits with families. Prerequisite:EDU 203, or EDM225 or EDS225 and admission to the school for Education. To be taken simultaneously with Practicum. 3:0:3.

Educational Philosophy:
  The instructor’s educational philosophy is one of interactive instruction based on lectures, quizzes, research, dialogues, internet, videos, presentations, writing, guest speakers and other learning strategies as appropriate. This course presents the foundations for understanding Special Education, the procedures involved in providing special education, the characteristics and educational needs of exceptional students, and the responsibilities of the regular educator in teaching all students.  Teacher candidates will be provided with opportunities to reflect upon and apply this content in class activities and in the construction of lesson plans that differentiate for student needs. Reflective inquiry is a key element of the course. Its purpose is to facilitate the teacher candidate’s development of critical reflection skills, the building of an individual but theory-based philosophy of teaching, and the beginnings of a dynamic repertoire of teaching strategies that complement the teacher candidate’s individual philosophy and style in the effort to meet the individual needs of students. 

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  • Analyze political, philosophical, and legal issues that influence general/regular and special education for students with disabilities.
    MoSTEP
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    1.2.3.3 knows when and how to access specialized services to meet students' needs;
    SPAs
    ·        NAEYC Standard 5
    ·        ACEI/NCATE Standards: 1, 5.4
    ·        Selected SPED Cross-Categorical Education Competencies1, 2, 4, 8, 10, CC2, CC6, CAT 4
    ·        NMSA: 1.K1, 6.K7, 6.D8, 6.P6
    ·        School for Education Conceptual Framework: Knowledge: 1B, 2B,3C; Skills 3C; Dispositions: 1A, 2A, 2B, 4A, 4E, 5B, 5F
    Assessment
    Journal, DI Reading Assignments, Core Assessment, Field Experience Project, Disability Awareness Project
  • Describe the characteristics of identified students with disabilities and discuss how these characteristics may impact their learning.
    MoSTEP
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    1.2.3.1 identifies prior experience, learning styles, strengths, and needs;
    SPAs
    •  NAEYC Standard: 1
    • ACEI/NCATE Standards: 3.2
    • Selected SPED Cross-Categorical Education Competencies 2, 4, 7, 10, CC3, CAT 4
    • NMSA: 1.K2
    • School for Education Conceptual Framework: Knowledge: 2F; Dispositions: 1A, 2B, 4A, 4E, 5B
    Assessment

    Journal, DI Reading Assignments, Core Assessment, Field Experience Project, Disability Awareness Project

  • Analyze the process of special education, including pre-referral interventions, referral, evaluation and identification, program planning (IEP/504 Plans), placement, and instruction/services for students with exceptionalities.
    MoSTEP
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    1.2.3.3 knows when and how to access specialized services to meet students' needs;
    1.2.9.3 practices professional ethics.
    1.2.10.4 identifies and uses the appropriate school personnel and community resources to help students reach their full potential.
    SPAs
    ·        Relevant MOSTEP Standards: 1.2.3.3, 1.2.9.3, 1.2.10.4
    ·        NAEYC Standard 5
    ·        ACEI/NCATE Standards: 1, 3.2, 5.4
    ·        Selected SPED Cross-Categorical Education Competencies: 1, 3, 7, 10, CC6, CC7, CAT 4
    • NMSA: 1.K1, 1.K2, 6.K7, 6.D8, 6.P6
    • School for Education Conceptual Framework: Knowledge: 3C; Skills: 2B, 3C; Dispositions: 1A, 2B, 4A, 5B
    Assessment
    Journal, DI Reading Assignments, Core Assessment, Field Experience Project, Disability Awareness Project
  • Explain the role and responsibilities of the general/regular education teacher in the special education process.
    MoSTEP
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    1.2.3.3 knows when and how to access specialized services to meet students' needs;
    1.2.9.3 practices professional ethics.
    1.2.10.4 identifies and uses the appropriate school personnel and community resources to help students reach their full potential.
    SPAs
    ·        NAEYC Standard 5
    ·        ACEI/NCATE Standards: 1, 5.4
    ·        Selected SPED Cross-Categorical Education Competencies1, 4, 7, 10, CC6, CAT 2, CAT4
    ·        NMSA: 1.K1, 6.K7, 6.D8, 6.P6
    ·        School for Education Conceptual Framework: Knowledge: 1B, 2F,3C; Skills: 1F, 2B, 3B; Dispositions: 1A, 2A, 2B
    Assessment
    Journal, DI Reading Assignments, Core Assessment, Field Experience Project, Disability Awareness Project
  • Compare and contrast the roles of the regular and special educator within the school system and discuss how they work as a collaborative team.
    MoSTEP
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    1.2.3.3 knows when and how to access specialized services to meet students' needs;
    1.2.9.3 practices professional ethics.
    1.2.10.4 identifies and uses the appropriate school personnel and community resources to help students reach their full potential.
    SPAs
     ·        NAEYC Standard 5
    ·        ACEI/NCATE Standards: 1, 5.4
    ·        Selected SPED Cross-Categorical Education Competencies1, 4, 7, 10, CC6, CAT 2, CAT 4
    ·        NMSA: 1.K1, 6.K7, 6.D8, 6.P6
    ·        School for Education Conceptual Framework: Knowledge: 1B, 2F,3C; Skills: 1F, 2B, 3B; Dispositions: 1A, 2A, 2B, 4A, 4E, 5B, 5F
    Assessment
    Journal, DI Reading Assignments, Core Assessment, Field Experience Project, Disability Awareness Project
  • Describe and assess differentiated instructional strategies designed and implemented to successfully include students with disabilities in a regular classroom.
    MoSTEP
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    1.2.3.2 designs and implements individualized instruction for students based on their prior experience, learning styles, strengths, and needs;
    1.2.4.2 creates lessons and activities that recognize individual needs of diverse learners and variations in learning styles and performance;
    1.2.5.1 selects alternative teaching strategies, materials, and technology to achieve multiple instructional purposes and to meet student needs;
    1.2.11.2 plans and designs effective learning environments and experiences supported by informational and instructional technology;
    SPAs
     ·        NAEYC Standards: 4B, 4D
    ·        ACEI/NCATE Standards: 3.2
    ·        Selected SPED Cross-Categorical Education Competencies1, 4, 7, 10, CC6, CAT 2, CAT 4
    ·        NMSA: 1.K2
    ·        School for Education Conceptual Framework: Knowledge: 2A, 2D, 2F; Skills: 1B, 1E, 2B; Dispositions: 1A, 2A, 2B, 4A, 4E, 5B, 5D, 5F
    Assessment
    Journal, DI Reading Assignments, Core Assessment, Field Experience Project, Disability Awareness Project
  • Practice reflective analysis to increase one's professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions.
    MoSTEP
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    1.2.9 The preservice teacher is a reflective practitioner who applies the ethical practices of the profession and continually assesses the effects of his/her choices and actions on others. This reflective practitioner actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally and utilizes the assessment and professional growth to generate more learning for more students.
    SPAs
     ·        NAEYC Standard 5
    ·        ACEI/NCATE Standards: 5
    ·        Selected SPED Cross-Categorical Education Competencies 10, CAT 4
    ·        NMSA: 7.D1, 7.D2, 7.D4
    ·        School for Education Conceptual Framework: Knowledge: 2E, 2F; Skills: 2B, 2C, 2D, 3C; Dispositions: 1A, 2A, 3E, 4A, 4C, 4E, 5B, 5C, 5D
    Assessment
    Journal, DI Reading Assignments, Core Assessment, Field Experience Project, Disability Awareness Project
  • Demonstrate effective professional communication skills (ie. reading, writing, listening, speaking).
    MoSTEP
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    1.2.7.1 models effective verbal/non-verbal communication skills;
    1.2.7.4 uses a variety of media communication tools.
    SPAs
    ·        NAEYC Standard 5
    ·        ACEI/NCATE Standards: 5
    ·        Selected SPED Cross-Categorical Education Competencies 10, CC5, CC8, CAT 4
    ·        NMSA: 7.D1
    School for Education Conceptual Framework: Skills: 3A, 3C; Dispositions: 1C, 1E,, 4A, 4B
    Assessment

    Journal, DI Reading Assignments, Core Assessment, Field Experience Project, Disability Awareness Project



    Core Assessment:


    Core Assessment Description: All Park University courses must include a core assessment that measures the relevant Departmental Learning Outcomes. The purpose of this assessment is to determine if expectations have been met concerning mastery of learning outcomes across all instructional modalities. The core assessment for this course is the Lesson Plan Adaptation Project, which will be included as a major portion of the final exam and account for at least 20% of the total grade. To complete the Lesson Plan Adaptation Project, you must:


     A.) Submit a lesson plan for a general education classroom that covers approximately 45-60 minutes of instruction. The Lesson Plan Outline will be provided by the Instructor. The lesson plan may be at any level (e.g., grades K-12) and subject (e.g., math, communication arts, social studies, science) of your choosing. In designing your lesson plan, you should assume that you will be teaching students representing different cultural and linguistic backgrounds, as well as the complete range of diversity present in most urban school districts.


    B.) Given the inclusion of three (3) students with special learning needs (SLN) (descriptions of students with SLN will be provided by the Instructor) in your general education classroom, you are to analyze the characteristics of these students’ particular disabilities and special learning needs and examine how these characteristics might impact their learning in the general education classroom. In addition, examine how those students’ readiness levels, interests, and learning profiles might impact their learning needs.


    C.) Based on your examination and analysis above (see B), you are to propose at least two (2) accommodations for each of these given students with SLN in each of the following areas of the lesson plan you developed, including the content (i.e., “what” you teach; materials used), process (i.e., “how” you teach; student learning activities), AND product (i.e., students’ summative evaluation).


    D.) Furthermore, you must justify and evaluate how each of the accommodations your proposed will benefit each of these three students with SLN.


    E.) You are also to discuss how you plan to work with or collaborate with at least one (1) other collaborative partner, such as special education teachers, teacher’s aides, parents, volunteers, co-teachers, peer/cross-age tutors, in meeting the needs of these three students with SLN included in your general education classroom.


     

    Link to Class Rubric

    Class Assessment:
      1.  Maintain a Learning Journal.   Each chapter of Exceptional Children, An Introduction to Special Education will be assigned reading. Following the reading, complete a reflective entry (1-2 pages) for your Learning Journal in which you should select and discuss two (2) key elements from the assigned reading. Your discussion should focus on how these key elements will help and enhance your teaching of students with special learning needs in an inclusive classroom.  Although there are 15 chapters in the text, you are responsible for submitting 10 to be graded. Chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, & 7 are required; you choose the remaining five chapters on which to reflect and submit.


    2.  Complete a study guide question on Tomlinson's
    The Differentiated Classroom, for each of the 10 chapters. Select and answer one (1) question from the study guide provided by the Instructor.  Compile all study guides into a notebook/3 prong folder for scoring.
     
    3.  As part of the final exam, complete a reflective essay on the MoSTEP 1.2.3 performance standard for education professionals.  For ALL students, particularly those with exceptionalities, to be successful, it is important that the general education teacher "...understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners (MOSTEP Quality Indicator 1.2.3). Summary: the preservice teacher must have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to differentiate instruction to address and meet the diverse needs of students typically found in today's mixed-ability classrooms.

    To demonstrate one's competence of MoSTEP quality indicator 1.2.3, the general education teacher...

       1.2.3.1 identifies prior experience, learning styles, strengths, and needs;

       1.2.3.2 designs and implements individualized instruction based on prior experience, learning styles, strengths, and needs;

       1.2.3.3. knows when and how to access specialized services to meet students' needs; (You will use your reflection on Heward's chapter 2 and your case study to develop this standard and to use as artifacts)

       1.2.3.4 connects instruction to students' prior experiences and family, culture, and community.  (You will use your Lesson Plan  and assignments for Differentiated Instruction to help you develop this standard).

     4. Complete one (1) Field Experience, which may include:  
        a.  an interview of a Special Education Teacher,
        b.  an interview of a Regular Education Teacher working in an inclusive classroom,
        c.  an interview of a student with an exceptionality,
        d.  an interview of a parent/caretaker of a child with an exceptionality or disability,
        e. an observation of a classroom experience involving students with disabilities (e.g. inclusive classroom,  resource room, special classes at a special school, residential school, or home-or hospital-based instruction)
        f.  an observation of an IEP meeting OR
        g. other, with approval from Instructor

    NOTE:  Assure all people involved in field experience that NO identifying information about students/parents will be used in order to protect rights of privacy and confidentiality (FERPA).   The goal of the Field Experience is to enrich your knowledge and understanding of the professional dynamics involved in the education of children and youth with exceptionalities.

     To complete the assignment, you must:

    • Submit a written “Field Experience Purpose Statement/Proposal” (1-2 pages) to the Instructor for approval PRIOR to completing the field experience.  The purpose statement is an explanation of what you wish to learn by completing the particular field experience you have arranged.  For example, how will the field experience support, expand, or enrich what you are learning in class?  How will it help you learn more about working with children whit special learning needs?  NOTE: a copy of the pre-approved purpose statement MUST be attached to your written report; AND
    • Complete a 4+ page “Field Experience Report” that includes the following: NOTE:  each section of your written report must start with a heading:
    •  Introduction: describe your field experience project (e.g. Who, What, When, Where, How) and discuss your purpose (i.e. Why) for selecting this type of field experience.
    • Summary of the interview or observation, i.e. describe what happened, AND
    • Analysis and reflection ** Discuss how your field experience met your original purpose.  How did what you learned support, and/or expand what you are learning in class?  What did you learn from this experience to better prepare you to successfully include students with special learning needs in your classroom?  What additional questions or concerns do you have after your field experience has been completed?  Discuss what additional information you want to learn.

    5.      Complete a Disability Awareness Project. You are to become the class “expert” on a selected/assigned disability or exceptionality. Specifically, you are to:

    A.)   Research and summarize information from at least six (6) sources of information from the professional literature (e.g., textbooks, journal articles, books, Internet) on your selected/assigned disability or exceptionality in a Fact Sheet (e.g., Fact Sheet on Learning Disabilities). The Fact Sheet (4+ pages) MUST include the following components:

    I.                   Definition(s) of exceptionality**

     §         Include key definitions provided by IDEA/Missouri State Plan for Special Education, professional organizations, and/or researchers in the field.

    II.                Characteristics associated with the exceptionality**

    §         Discuss the (a) cognitive and perceptual, (b) language, (c) learning, and (d) social-emotional characteristics associated with this type of disability AND

    §         Discuss how these characteristics might impact a student’s learning (e.g., in the general education classroom).

    III.             Prevalence

    §         Discuss the occurrence of the exceptionality.

    IV.              Types

    §         Discuss the different types associated with the exceptionality (if appropriate).

    V.                 Causes           

    §         Discuss the causes associated with the exceptionality.

    VI.              Identification and Assessment

    §         Describe the identification and eligibility requirements for this type of exceptionality to receive SPED services in Missouri.

    VII.           Treatment

    §        Discuss treatment approaches (e.g., medication, therapy) used in working with students with this type of exceptionality (if appropriate).

    VIII.        Differentiated Instructional Strategies**

    Based on your research, discuss best practices regarding differentiated instructional strategies being promoted by educators/researchers in the professional literature to help students with this type of disability/exceptionality be successful in a general education classroom. Specifically, you are to:

    §        Discuss strategies to differentiated (a) content (i.e., what you teach and what materials you use), (b) process, (i.e., how you teach and what learning activities you engage students), and (c) product (i.e., summative evaluation) that can be used by the regular education teacher to help students with the exceptionality be successful in a regular classroom and access the general education curriculum.

    §        Discuss the use of technologies; auxiliary aids, support services etc. that can be used by the regular education teacher to help students with the exceptionality be successful in a classroom and access the general education curriculum.

    IX.              Key Resources for Professionals**

    §        List and briefly describe at least four (4) key resources (e.g., Internet sites, Professional Organizations, written materials, etc.) that would serve as valuable resources for the general education teacher when working with students with the exceptionality.

    X.                 References

    §         Using APA format, list at least six references used in compiling the information for your fact sheet.

    B.)   On the day of your presentation, post on e-companion or provide a copy of your Fact Sheet to all members of the class for their Resource Notebooks. It would be helpful and appreciated if you would 3-hole punch your handouts for your peers.

    C.)   Using information from your research review and Fact Sheet, prepare a 30-minute (approximately) presentation on your assigned exceptionality. Prepare your presentation as if you were invited by your school principal, who is aware of your expertise, to be the guest speaker on your exceptionality topic at the next faculty meeting. Your audience is made up of regular education teacher who wish to learn and be better prepared to meet the needs of students with disabilities or exceptionalities. Therefore, they are interested in learning about the definition(s) of the disability/exceptionality; the key characteristics associated with the exceptionality and how these characteristics might impact a student’s performance in the regular education classroom; and, more importantly, recommendations for differentiated strategies to help these types of students be successful in the regular education classroom, along with 1-2 premier professional resources they might use for future reference. Hence, as part of your presentation, you will want to:

    -   Demonstrate your level of knowledge;

    -   Use PowerPoint to highlight key information;

    Note: a "hard" copy of the PowerPoint presentation must be provided to the Instructor on the day of your presentation.

    -   Engage your audience (i.e., be creative, interactive, and interesting);

    Note: You MUST include at least one (1) learning activity to help engage the audience (however, more than one would be better!!!!). Your learning activity may occur before, during, and/or after your presentation.

    -       Make it beneficial and worthwhile for your audience; AND Note: your goal is to increase your audience’s awareness of the exceptionality  and knowledge of how to effectively work with students with this exceptionality in a regular  education classroom.

    -   Professionally present information (e.g., appropriate voice level, eye contact,   body language, professional dress).

    D.)   After completing your presentation, critically reflect on your own performance and analyze in a written reflective essay (2+ pages): (a) what went well, (b) what didn't go as well as you wished, and (c) how you could improve your presentation the next time. Note: each section of your reflective essay should start with a heading. Your reflective essay is due one (1) week after your presentation.

    6. Compile a Resource Notebook: which will organize information generated during the course (class lectures, presentations/facts sheets, handouts, article summaries, journals, Disability Awareness Project, etc.) in a 3-ring binder.

    7. Complete Practicum Requirements as required by your catalog. Students taking this course for EDU375 credit must collaborate with the Instructor and the Practicum Supervisor to complete the Practicum/Field experience requirements.

    8. Final Exam: The Core Learning Assessment (Learning Plan Adaptation Project) and the reflective essay Standard 1.2.3 will be included as part of the final exam.

    Grading:

      Grading: The final grade will be based on the percentage of total points earned.
    A = 90-100%
    B = 80-89%
    C = 70-79%
             
    Attendance/Participation                                        141 points
    In-class Activities/tests                                            50 points
    Learning Journal 10/15 or 10 @ 15 points each     150 points
    DI - 1 question per chapter @ 15 points each         150 points       
    Field Experience Proposal                                        25 points
    Field Experience Report                                         100 points
    Disability Awareness Presentation                          174 points
    Peer review  of presentation =         54 points 
    Fact sheet, etc. =                             100 points
    DA reflection =                                 20 points
    Lesson Plan Adaptation Project                               200 points
    Standard                                                                   100 points
    Resource Notebook                                                    50 points

    Late Submission of Course Materials:
      Timely completion of assignments is required. Late work will be accepted up to one week late, but the grade will be reduced. Late submissions of drafts, presentations, reports, study guides, notebook, and portfolio will result in a grade reduction of 25%. Absolutely no work will be accepted after the assigned time of the final. Any missing work/assignments will be recorded as a “zero”.

    Classroom Rules of Conduct:
     The policy on appropriate conduct as defined in the student handbook will be enforced. Conflicts will be administered in the procedures outlined in the handbook.

    Computers make writing and revising much easier and more productive. Students must recognize though that technology can also cause problems. Printers run out of ink and hard drive crash. Students must be responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines in spite of technology. Be sure to save copies of your work to disk, hard drive, and print out paper copies for backup purposes. Class time should not be used to accomplish this.

    Text messaging and phone usage are considered unprofessional and is unacceptable conduct during class time.

    Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
     

    Week

    Date

    Topics/Assignments

    One

    Aug. 16

    Introductions & Syllabus Review of
    Course Requirements:

    Prepare to 1. choose a disability for the Disability Awareness Project Presentation, and 2. select a Field Experience (Proposal due 8/30, Report due 10/4).

    Pretest

    Discussion: History of Special Education;

    Alphabet Soup & the Law

    Assignment: Read ch.1, 2, & 3 of Heward, and complete a Learning Journal Entry for each.

    Practicum Placement Discussion-Read: Practicum Fieldwork Manual

    Two

    Aug. 23

     Overview of Exceptionalities-Select 1 for the DAP:____________________

    Discussion: What is Collaboration?

    Working with Colleagues, Parents & Students

    People First Language & Support Organizations

     Assignment: Read Heward, ch.5, Learning Disabilities, & ch.7 Autism Spectrum; Complete a Learning Journal Entry for each.

    Three

    Aug. 30

    DUE: Field Experience Proposal

    Discussion: What is Differentiation?
    What is Inclusion?

    Meeting student needs and GLEs through Co-Teaching and Delivery Models     

    Assignment: Read ch.1-5, Tomlinson, The Differentiated Classroom and respond to 1 question from each chapter study guide;

    Read Heward ch. 4, Intellectual Disabilities, optional Learning Journal Entry.

    *Bring YOUR copy of the IEP to the next class session 
     

    Four

    Sept. 6

     LABOR DAY-no class

    Five

    Sept. 13

    DUE: Heward Required Learning Journals: Ch. 1-3, 5, 7.

    Educational Needs of Exceptional Students & Requirements: IEP & 504 Plans & You

                          RTI,  Documentation, Team Meetings,

    Assessments & Re-evals

    Assignment: Read ch.6-10, Tomlinson, and respond to 1 question from each chapter study guide;

    Read ch.6, Heward, Emotional or Behavioral Disorders;

    optional learning journal entry

    Six

    Sept. 20

     DUE: Responses to 10 ? from Tomlinson Study Guides

    Begin Disability Awareness Presentations & Peer review

    Discussion: Creating appropriate lesson plans by using Backwards Design

    Coordinating MO Standards and IEP Goals through Differentiation -Incorporating specific accommodations & modifications for special needs in lesson plans.   


    Assignment: Read ch.14, Heward, Early Childhood Special Education , optional learning journal entry   

    Seven

    Sept. 27

    DUE: lesson plan outline

    Disability Awareness Presentations & Peer review

    Discussion & Peer Review of lesson plans

    Collaborating to assess the needs of the learner, learning profiles, & interests

     Including specific accommodations & modifications for special needs in lesson plans  to differentiate in content, process & product (LPAP )

     
    Assignment: Read ch.14, Heward, Early Childhood Special Education , optional learning journal entry   

    Eight

    Oct. 4

    DUE: Field Experience Report

     Disability Awareness Presentation & Peer review

    Discussion: Early Intervention & RTI; Communication Disorders 

    Continue collaboration for Lesson Plan Adaptation Project-Determine three student's special learning needs from evaluation data provided-in CONTENT, PROCESS, & PRODUCT.

    Assignment: Develop Lesson Plan (LPAP-core assess.) with accommodations for each of the three students. Draft due 10/25, Final copy & Micro-teaching 11/15.

    Read ch.8, Heward; optional learning journal entry.

    Oct. 10-17

    Fall Break

    Nine

    Oct. 18

    Disability Awareness Presentation & Peer Reviews

    Discussion: Physical Disabilities, OHI, ADD/ADHD & Low-Incidence Multiple Disabilities

    Assignment: Read Ch.11 & 12,Heward, optional learning journal entries

    Ten

    Oct. 25

     DUE: Lesson Plan Adaptation Project Draft
     
     Peer review & Editing Session

    Discussion: The Umbrella of the Autism Spectrum

    Assignment: Read Heward, ch.9 &10; optional learning journal entries

    Eleven

    Nov. 1

    Disability Awareness Presentation & Peer Reviews

    Hearing Loss & Visual Impairments

    Resources

    Assignment: Read ch.13 & 15, Heward; optional learning journal entries

    Twelve

    Nov. 8

    DUE: 5 Optional Heward Learning Journals

     Disability Awareness Presentation & Peer Reviews

    Discussion: What happens to a student with special needs following graduation?

    Transition Plans & Programs

    Assignment: Complete LPAP & Essay

    Thirteen

    Nov. 15

    DUE: L.P. Adaptation Project & Essay  

     Begin Micro teaching of LP

     Disability Awareness Presentation & Peer Reviews

    Writing to the MoStep Standard 1.2.3

    Assigment: Prepare draft of 1.2.3-1.2.3.4

    Fourteen

    Nov. 22

    Disability Awareness Presentation & Peer Reviews

    Continue Micro teaching of LP 

    Discussion: Giftedness & Special Education

    Dispositions

    Writing to MoStep Standard 1.2.3

    Assignment: Draft 1.2.3-1.2.3.4

    Fifteen

    Nov. 29

    DUE: Resource Notebook: Includes 10 Heward Learning Journals, class materials, Tomlinson Study Guides, Field Experience Proposal & Report, DAP fact sheets and research info

     Draft 1.2.3-1.2.3.4

    Peer review & Editing of draft-final copy due with final

    Sixteen

    Dec. 6

    Final: Final copy 1.2.3 DUE posted on Foliotek

    Placemat course evaluation & discussion

    All work must be turned in by 3:30 p.m.

    Notebooks to be returned.

    Academic Honesty:
    Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog Page 92

    Plagiarism:
    Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog Page 92-93

    Attendance Policy:
    Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

    1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
    2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
    3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
    4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
    5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
    6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

    Park University 2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95-96

    Disability Guidelines:
    Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



    Rubric

    CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
    Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
    Outcomes
    1 & 2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
    The artifact provided abundant information to discuss the characteristics of a given disability and to diagnose the impact of those characteristics on a student's learning.  The discussion and diagnosis consisted of rich, detailed statements with lots of elaboration and explanation. The artifact provided sufficient information to discuss the characteristics of a given disability and to diagnose the impact of those characteristics on a student's learning. The discussion and diagnosis consisted of general statements with little/minimal




    detail or elaboration.




     
    While there was some information discussing the characteristics of a given disability and diagnosing the impact of those characteristics on a student's learning, the information was vague, unclear, and incomplete. No Evidence: The artifact did not describe any characteristics of a given disability and/or did not diagnose the impact of a disability's characteristics on a student's learning. 
    Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
    Outcomes
    1 & 2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
    The artifact demonstrated the student's ability to identify the learning needs of a given student with SLN by using information in all three (3) of the following areas, including a student's readiness levels, interests, and learning profile. The artifact demonstrated the student's ability to identify the learning needs of a given student with SLN by using information in at least two (2) of the three following areas, including a student's readiness levels, interests, and learning profile. The artifact demonstrated the student's limited ability to identify the learning needs of a given student with SLN by using information in only one (1) of the three following areas, including readiness levels, interests, and learning profile. No Evidence: The artifact did not identify any of the learning needs of a given student with SLN. 
    Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
    Outcomes
    4 & 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
    The artifact provided abundant information to justify the selection of accommodations to benefit a given student with SLN. The justification consisted of rich, detailed statements with lots of elaboration and explanation. The artifact provided sufficient information to justify the selection of accommodations to benefit a given student with SLN. The justification consisted of general statements with little detail/minimal or elaboration. The artifact provided limited information to justify the selection of accommodations to benefit a given student with SLN. The justification was vague, unclear, and incomplete. No Evidence: The artifact did not provide any justification for the selection of accommodations to benefit a given student with SLN. 
    Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
    Outcomes
    5 & 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
    The artifact provided an accommodation plan for a student with a given SLN that identified three or more (3+) accommodations in the content, product, AND product areas on a Lesson Plan. The artifact provided an accommodation plan for a student with a given SLN that identified two (2) accommodations in the content, process, AND product areas of a Lesson Plan. The artifact provided an accommodation plan for a student with a given SLN that identified only one (1) accommodation in the content, product, AND process areas of a Lesson Plan. No Evidence: The artifact provided an accommodation plan for a student with a given SLN in which there were no accommodations or missing accommodations in the content, process, AND product areas of a Lesson Plan. 
    Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
    Outcomes
    5 & 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
    The artifact provided a plan to establish and maintain a collaborative partnership with at least one other partner that included all five (5) of the critical elements needed for effective collaboration. The artifact provided a plan to establish and maintain a collaborative partnership with at least one other partner that included four (4) of the five critical collaborative elements. The artifact provided a plan to establish and maintain a collaborative partnership with at least one other partner that included three (3) of the five critical collaborative elements. No Evidence: The artifact provided a collaboration plan that include two or less (>2) of the five critical collaboration elements. 
    Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
    Outcomes
    7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
    The artifact as a whole demonstrated the ability to effectively communicate the differentiation process through the use of correct writing structures and document organization, which included a logical sequencing of artifact components (<5 errors). The artifact as a whole demonstrated the ability to effectively communicate the differentiation process through the use of correct writing structures and document organization, which included a logical sequencing of artifact components (5-10 errors). The artifact as a whole demonstrated limited ability to effectively communicate the differentiation process through the use of correct writing structures and document organization, which included a logical sequencing of artifact components (11-15 errors). The artifact as a whole did not demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate the differentiation process through the use of correct writing structures and document organization, which included a logical sequencing of artifact components (16+ errors). 
    Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
    Outcomes
    7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
    Contains no errors (0) in the following paper format items:




    •APA




    •References cited




    •Use of people first language




    •Word usage




    •Spelling




    •Punctuation




    •Paragraph and sentence structure




     
    Contains no more than 5 errors (<5) in the following paper format items:




    •APA




    •References cited




    •Use of people first language




    •Word usage




    •Spelling




    •Punctuation




    •Paragraph and sentence structure




     
    Contains no more than 10 errors (6-10) in the following paper format items:




    •APA




    •References cited




    •Use of people first language




    •Word usage




    •Spelling




    •Punctuation




    •Paragraph and sentence structure




     
    Contains more than 10 errors (10+) in the following paper format items:




    •APA




    •References cited




    •Use of people first language




    •Word usage




    •Spelling




    •Punctuation




    •Paragraph and sentence structure




     

    Copyright:

    This material is protected by copyright
                                   and can not be reused without author permission.

    Last Updated:8/4/2010 6:28:30 AM