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Education Major Version

ED 520 Special Needs in the Classroom
Seybert, Linda


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

ED 520 Special Needs in the Classroom

Semester

F2P 2010 ED

Faculty

Seybert, Linda

Title

Associate Professor

Degrees/Certificates

Ph.D.

Office Location

Copley, room 315

Office Hours

Mondays and Thursdays, 1:00 - 5:00; or by appointment

Daytime Phone

816-584-6734

E-Mail

Linda.Seybert@park.edu

Semester Dates

October 18 - December 10, 2010

Class Days

-M-----

Class Time

5:00 - 9:30 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

 
Required Texts/Materials:

Crawford, V. (2002). Embracing the monster: Overcoming the challenges of hidden disabilities.

Baltimore, MA: Paul H. Brooks Publishing Co.

      - ISBN #1-55766-522-2

Turnbull, A., Turnbull, H.R., & Wehmeyer, M.L. (2010). Exceptional lives: Special education in

today’s schools, (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

            - ISBN # 0136101410

      Note: Students are encouraged to use resource materials provided by the authors and  publishers, which may be accessed at http://www.prenhall.com/turnbull

Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. (2010). Individual education

Program (IEP). Retrieved October 3, 2010, from http://www.dese.mo.gov/divspeced/Compliance/IEP/documents/IEPfull.pdf

Note: Students are responsible for making themselves a copy of Missouri’s Individual Education Program (full version – with all attachments, including forms A – F and the Data Collection form, 17 pages total), which may be accessed at the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education website or in the ED 520 webliography.

Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. (2010). Regulation III identification and evaluation. In Missouri state plan for part B of the individuals with disabilities act (pp. 18 - 39). Jefferson City, MO: Author.

       - May be accessed      http://www.dese.mo.gov/divspeced/stateplan/documents/Regulation_III_2010.pdf     

Note: students are responsible for making themselves a copy of section “Regulation III Identification and Evaluation”of the Missouri State Plan for Special Education (22 pages), which may be accessed at the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education website or in the ED 520 webliography.

Tomlinson, C.A. (2005). The differentiated classroom: Responding to the needs of all learners.

            Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

-         ISBN # 0-13-119502-6

Recommended Text (not required):

 American Psychological Association. (2001). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

-         See http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/ for general info about APA guidelines

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
ED 520 Special Needs in the Classroom: Designed to address the special needs of students being mainstreamed into the traditional classroom. A minimum of three (3) hours of practicum experience in the field is required.

Educational Philosophy:


FACULTY’S EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY:
The instructor’s educational philosophy is to encourage learners to interact with one another—to share knowledge, skills, experiences, thoughts, and beliefs—in a climate of mutual respect and appreciation of differences in order to enhance professional/personal knowledge and skills. A variety of instructional formats are utilized, including lectures, readings, quizzes, dialogues, examinations, Internet, videos, web sites, and writings, with the goal of motivating the learner to self-reflect and analyze how new/enhanced knowledge and skills can be applied to improve his/her future educational practices.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Analyze political, philosophical, and legal issues that influence general and special education for students with disabilities and exceptionalities;
  2. Analyze the process of special education, including prereferral interventions, referral, evaluation and identification, program planning (IEP/504 Plans), placement, and instruction/services for students with exceptionalities;
  3. Explain the role and responsibilities of the general education teacher in educating students with special learning needs;
  4. Compare and contrast the roles of the general and special educator within the school system and how they work as a collaborative team;
  5. Describe the characteristics of students with various types of special learning needs and discuss how these characteristics may impact their learning;
  6. Describe and assess differentiated instructional strategies designed and implemented to successfully include students with special learning needs in the general education classroom;
  7. Analyze current instructional strategies and programs designed to enhance student learning and success in the classroom; and
  8. Practice reflective analysis to increase one's professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions.


Core Assessment:

All Park University courses must include a core assessment that measures the relevant Departmental Learning Outcomes. The purpose of this assessment is to determine if expectations have been met concerning mastery of learning outcomes across all instructional modalities. The core assessment for this course is the Lesson Plan Adaptation Project and will account for 20% of the total grade. To complete the Lesson Plan Adaptation Project, students must:

 

A.)     Submit an instructional unit for a general education classroom that covers a minimum of one week or five individual lessons plans. A Lesson Plan Outline will be provided by the Instructor (see p. 14 of syllabus). The instructional unit may be at any level (e.g., grades K-12) and subject (e.g., math, communication arts, social studies, science) of your choosing. In designing your instructional unit, you should assume that you will be teaching students representing different cultural and linguistic backgrounds, as well as the complete range of diversity present in most urban school districts.

B.)     Given the inclusion of three students with special learning needs (SLN) (descriptions of students with SLN will be provided by the Instructor) in your general education classroom, you are to analyze the characteristics of these students' particular disabilities and special learning needs and examine how these characteristics might impact their learning in the classroom. In addition, examine how each student's readiness levels, interests, and learning profiles might impact their learning.

C.)     Based on your examination and analysis above (see B), you are to propose accommodations for each of these given students with SLN in all of the following areas on the (5) lesson plans you developed for your instructional unit, including content (i.e., “what” you teach; materials used), process (i.e., “how” you teach; student learning activities), AND product (i.e., students' summative evaluation).

D.)     Furthermore, you must justify and evaluation how each of the accommodations you proposed will benefit each of these students with SLN.

E.)      You are also to discuss how you plan to work with or collaborate with at least two (2) other collaborative partners, such as special education teachers, teachers' aides, parents, volunteers, co-teachers, peer/cross-age tutors), to meet the needs of these students with SLN.

 

You should be prepared to present your Lesson Plan Adaptation Project and defend your analysis to other students in class.

 

Note: The Core Assessment Rubric (CAR) has been provided for your information. The CAR will be used to report data to Park University's Assessment Committee for North Central Accreditation requirements, but WILL NOT BE USED to calculate your final grade. The Instructor will provide you with a scoring guide for the Lesson Plan Adaptation Project that WILL BE USED to calculate your final grade.

Note: You must submit a hard copy AND an electronic document (i.e., Word file) of your Lesson Plan Adaptation Project to the Instructor. The hard copy will be returned to the student with Instructor comments and scoring and the electronic version will be submitted to the UAC for documentation purposes.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
 Course Requirements:

You are required to:

1.)      Read the text Embracing the Monster and complete the reflective reading assignment provided by the Instructor. The reflective reading assignment may be found in doc sharing, category ED 520(GR). This assignment will be submitted to the Instructor for grading as an attachment to the appropriate dropbox basket.

2.)      Maintain a Learning Journal. For each chapter assigned in Exceptional Lives, you are to read and complete a reflective entry (1+ pages) for your Learning Journal. For your reflective entry, you should select and discuss one (1) key element from the assigned chapter; your discussion should focus on how this self-selected key element will help and enhance your teaching of students with special learning needs. Completed journal entries must be submitted to the Instructor for grading as an attachment to the appropriate dropbox basket.

3.)      Complete study guide questions on Tomlinson’s The Differentiated Classroom. For each chapter assigned in The Differentiated Classroom, you are to select and answer two (2) questions from the study guide provided by the Instructor. The study guide may be found in doc sharing, category ED 520(GR). This assignment will be submitted to the Instructor for grading as an attachment to the appropriate dropbox basket.

4.)      Complete an Exceptionality Awareness Project. Using information researched from (at least) five (5) sources of information (e.g., textbooks, journal articles, books, Internet)…

A.)   Summarize information from your research on your selected/assigned exceptionality in a Fact Sheet (e.g., Fact Sheet on Learning Disabilities). 

The Fact Sheet (4+ pages) MUST include the following components:

I.                   Definition(s) of exceptionality

§         Include key definitions provided by IDEA/Missouri State Plan for Special Education, professional organizations, and/or researchers in the field.

II.                Characteristics associated with the exceptionality

§         Discuss the

(a) cognitive and perceptual,

(b) language,

(c) learning, and

(d) social-emotional characteristics

associated with this type of exceptionality AND

§         Discuss how each of these characteristics might impact a student’s learning in the general education classroom.

III.             Prevalence

§         Discuss the occurrence of the exceptionality.

IV.              Types

§         Discuss the different types associated with the exceptionality (if appropriate).

V.                 Causes           

§         Discuss the causes associated with the exceptionality.

VI.              Identification and Assessment

§         Describe the identification and eligibility requirements for this type of exceptionality to receive SPED or special services (e.g., ESOL, Gifted) in Missouri.

VII.           Treatment

§        Discuss treatment approaches (e.g., medication, therapy) used in working with students with this type of exceptionality (if appropriate).

VIII.        Differentiated Instructional Strategies****

§        Discuss strategies to differentiated

(a) content (i.e., what you teach and what materials you use),

(b) process, (i.e., how you teach and what learning activities you engage students), and

(c) product (i.e., summative evaluation)

that can be used by the regular education teacher to help students with the exceptionality be successful in a regular classroom and access the general education curriculum.

§        Discuss the use of technologies; auxiliary aids, support services etc. that can be used by the regular education teacher to help students with the exceptionality be successful in a regular classroom and access the general education curriculum.

IX.              Key Resources for Professionals

§         List and briefly describe at least four (4) key resources (e.g., Internet sites, Professional Organizations, written materials, etc.) that would serve as valuable resources for the general education teacher when working with students with the exceptionality.

X.                 References

§         Using APA format, list the (at least five) references used in compiling the information for your fact sheet.

B.)   On the day of your presentation, provide a copy of your "Fact Sheet” to all members of the class for their Resource Notebooks. You must also upload a copy of your Fact Sheet in doc sharing, category Exceptionality Awareness Project.

C.)   Using information from your research review and Fact Sheet, prepare a 20-30-minute (approximately) presentation on your assigned exceptionality. Prepare your presentation as if you were invited by your school principal to be the guest speaker on your exceptionality topic at the next faculty meeting in which other professional educators and staff will make up your audience. Therefore, as part of your presentation, you will want to:

-   Demonstrate your level of knowledge of your topic by covering the key informational   

    components of the Fact Sheet;

-   Use PowerPoint to highlight key information;

Note: a "hard" copy of the PowerPoint presentation must be provided to the Instructor on the day of your presentation. You must also upload a copy of your PPt Presentation in doc sharing, category Exceptionality Awareness Project.

-   Engage your audience (i.e., be creative, interactive, and interesting);

Note: You MUST include at least one (1) learning activity to help engage the audience (however, more than one would be better!!!!).

-         Make it beneficial and worthwhile for your audience; AND

Note: your goal is to increase your audience’s awareness of the exceptionality  and how to effectively work with students with this exceptionality in a regular education classroom.

-   Professionally present information (e.g., appropriate voice level, eye contact, body language, professional dress).

D.)   After your presentation, complete a written self-reflection (2+ pages, with appropriate headings) in which you comment on: (a) what went well with your project, (b) what did not go as well as you would have liked, and (c) what you learned about yourself that would enhance your performance in the future. Your self-reflection is due the class session following your presentation. This assignment will be submitted to the Instructor for grading as an attachment to the appropriate dropbox basket.

5.      Complete a Professional Development Project.

A.) For the MAT student who is in the post-baccalaureate initial certification program (PBI) (e.g., ED 600 Field Experience), you must complete at least three (3) hours of clinical/practicum experiences in the field and create a Reflective Journal documenting and detailing these experiences. All clinical/practicum experiences MUST be approved by the Instructor and/or the Director of Practicum Experiences.

The Reflective Journal must include:

a.)    Purpose – Why? (5% of total points). Discuss the purpose of this practicum experience in your course of study and this course in particular.

b.)    Description – Where? Who? When? (10% of total grade). Provide a description of this PDP, e.g., where did you complete this assignment (i.e., description of the school or location), who did you worked with (e.g., teachers, students, administrators), when did you completed this project (e.g., dates, days, times).

c.)    Summary – What did you do? (15% of total points). Briefly describe what you did in this project (e.g., tutoring, teaching, classroom observation, assist teacher)

d.)    Reflection – What did you learn? (60% of total points). Discuss what you learned during your field experience(s) and it relates to the topics covered in this course.  Note: This is the most important portion of your PDP reflective journal. This is where you are to critically analyze what you learned during your practicum experience and then connect it course content (e.g., texts, Instructor lectures) and your professional development.

e.)    Appendix (10% of total points). Include completed copies of the MAT Practicum forms (i.e., the MAT Time Sheet and the MAT Practicum Documentation form) as documentation and verification of clinical/practicum hours you completed. Copies of these forms may be found in doc sharing, category PDP on the ED 520 e-Companion website.

All PBI MAT students are required to complete and document their completion of at least 30 hours of practicum/clinical experience in the field PRIOR to their directed student teaching semester (ED 600) (Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog, p. 91).

 OR

B.)   For the MAT student who is in the post-baccalaureate initial alternative certification program (PBA) (e.g., ED 602 Mentorship) or for the student who is in one of the other Master programs (MED, MEOL), you are to design and implement a project to enhance your own professional development on a self-selected issue related to being an effective teacher for students with exceptional learning needs (ELN). The professional development project should be individualized to meet your needs related to your knowledge and skills in working with students with ELN, and should take into consideration your background (e.g., area/s of certification), level of experience (e.g., 1st year teacher), level of experience working with students with ELN, the age/grade of the students with whom you work (e.g., elementary, middle school, high school), where you work (e.g., urban, rural, suburban), and your professional interests.

                 To complete your professional development project, you must:

a.)    Submitted a written purpose statement (1 page) for your professional development project to the Instructor for approval PRIOR to initiating the project. The purpose statement is an explanation of what you wish to learn by completing this particular project (e.g., How will this project support, expand, and/or enrich your professional development in regards to being an effective teacher working with students with ELN?). In addition to your purpose statement, you must develop 4-6 guiding questions relative to your project you will answer as you complete your project. (25% of total points)

Note: a copy of the pre-approved purpose statement, with guiding questions, MUST be attached to your written report; AND

b.)    Complete a 3+ page written report that includes the following:

§ Introduction - describe your professional development project (e.g., Who, What, When, Where, How) and discuss what your purpose (i.e., Why) was for selecting this type of project (10% of total points);

§ Summary of the activities involved in your project (i.e., what did you do to answer the guiding questions associated with your project) (15% of total points); AND

§ Analysis and Reflection - Discuss how your professional development project met your original purpose and answered your guiding questions. How did it enhance your professional development in regards to being an effective teacher working with students with ELN? How did what you learn support, refute, and/or expand what you are learning in class and/or in your everyday practice? What did you learn from this experience that will enhance your teaching and make you a more effective teacher, particularly when working with students who are ELN? Enhance your students’ learning? What additional questions or concerns do you have after your project has been completed? Discuss what additional information you want to learn about working effectively with students with ELN. (50% of the total points).

Note: each section of your written report must start with a heading.

You should be prepared to share your Professional Development Project with others in class.

6.)      Complete a reflective essayon the general education teacher's responsibility for creating success for ALL students, particularly for students with special learning needs.

For all MAT Students: For your SFE Portfolio, complete reflective essays (5 total) for all of the quality and performance indicators related to MoSTEP 1.2.3. For ALL students, particularly those with exceptionalities, to be successful, it is important that the general education teacher “…understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners” (MoSTEP Quality Indicator 1.2.3). 

      Summary: The preservice teacher must have the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to      differentiate instruction to address and meet the diverse needs of students typically found    in today’s mixed-ability classrooms.

To help you complete this assignment, you will engage in a Peer Review process with others in the class. As a Peer Reviewer, you are responsible for closely studying the SFE Portfolio Rubric criteria for the portfolio entries you are reviewing and, based on those criteria, provide meaningful, substantive feedback to your peers’ entries to help them improve their work. As a teacher, you will be constantly called upon to use criteria to guide your evaluation of your students' performance, so the Peer Review process allows you to practice those skills needed to meet that responsibility. Another benefit is the close study of evaluation criteria should help guide you, as a writer, to produce high quality work, i.e., portfolio entries. As a Writer, based on the feedback you receive from your peers, you are responsible for making appropriate corrections and revisions to your entries. The goal is to produce successively improved drafts of your entries based on feedback from your group BEFORE you submit your portfolio entries for Instructor review. We will be using part of our class sessions as a Writing Lab; however, you may also need to work with your peers outside of class to complete this assignment.

The portfolio entries you wish to be reviewed by the Instructor MUST BE submitted via your electronic portfolio – NO EXCEPTIONS!! When you have uploaded entries for Instructor review, you must click on ‘Request Review’ (green check mark, upper right-hand corner) and identify the specific Instructor who you wish to review your entry (i.e., Linda Seybert). The Instructor will be notified via email your entry is ready and waiting to be reviewed. All submitted portfolio entries will be evaluated by the criteria outlined in the SFE Portfolio Rubric.

One of the graduation requirements for MAT students is to complete “an approved portfolio…that addresses satisfactorily the Missouri standards for a beginning teacher [i.e., MoSTEPS]. The portfolio must be submitted by the fifth week of the last term of the student’s program. A student cannot complete the program or be recommended for certification without an acceptable portfolio…” (Park University Graduate Catalog 2010-2011, p. 92).

OR

For  Students in other Graduate Programs (MED, MEOL): Your essay (3+ pages) should include an analysis of the information learned from the textbooks/materials, class presentations, class discussions and activities, assignments, etc. AND evaluation of the critical knowledge and skills a teacher or administrator must know and be able to do to successfully include students with special learning needs in the regular classroom. You may wish to reference the following information BEFORE writing your reflection essay.

• Missouri Standards for Teacher Education Programs (MoSTEP) – Quality Indicator 1.2.3 and performance indicators 1.2.3.1, 1.2.3.2, 1.2.3.3, and 1.2.3.4.

• Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) Code of Ethics for Educators of Persons with Exceptionalities (http://www.cec.sped.org/ps/ps-ethic.html)

• Crawford, V. (2002). Embracing the monster: Overcoming the challenges of hidden disabilities. Baltimore, MA: Paul H. Brooks Publishing Co.

7.)      Core Assessment: Lesson Plan Adaptation Project

All Park University courses must include a core assessment that measures the relevant Departmental Learning Outcomes. The purpose of this assessment is to determine if expectations have been met concerning mastery of learning outcomes across all instructional modalities. The core assessment for this course is the Lesson Plan Adaptation Project and will account for 20% of the total grade. To complete the Lesson Plan Adaptation Project, students must:

A.)     Prepare and submit a lesson plan for a general education classroom; the lesson plan may cover one class period or multiple class periods. The lesson plan may be a pre-existing one or created from scratch; however, regardless of its source, it must be formatted the same as the Lesson Plan Outline provided by the Instructor (see syllabus). Note: if you use a pre-existing lesson plan, you must reference your source. The lesson plan may be at any level (grades K-12) or content area (e.g., Language Arts, math, social studies, science) of your choosing.

§      Teacher Work Sample (TWS) – Components II, IV, and VI

§      Note: copies of the TWS with lesson plan outline and TWS Rubric may be found in doc sharing, category Lesson Plan Adaptation Project on the ED 520 e-Companion website.

B.)     Given the inclusion of three students with special learning needs (SLN) (descriptions of students with SLN will be provided by the Instructor) in your general education classroom, you are to analyze the characteristics of these students’ particular disabilities and special learning needs AND examine how these characteristics might impact their learning in the classroom. In addition, examine how each student’s readiness levels, interests, and learning profiles might impact their learning.

§      TWS – Component I (Learning Contexts – Student Characteristics)

C.)     Based on your examination and analysis above (see B), you are to propose AND justify the use of at least two (2) accommodations for each of these given students with SLN in each of the following areas on the lesson plans developed for your instructional unit, including:

1.)      content (i.e., “what” you teach; materials used),

2.)      process (i.e., “how” you teach; student learning activities), AND

3.)      product (i.e., students’ summative evaluation).

   Your justification must include a discussion of how each of the accommodations/ 

   modifications/assistive technologies you proposed will aid each of these students be

   successful in the regular education classroom. If you provided no accommodations/  

   adaptations for the students in these sections of the lesson plans, then you must 

   provide justification for your decision.

§         TWS – Components II, IV, and VI

D.)     You are also to discuss how you plan to include essential elements of effective collaboration (Friend & Cook, 2003) to collaborate with at least two (2) other collaborative partners, such as special education teachers, teachers’ aides, parents, volunteers, co-teachers, peer/cross-age tutors), to meet the needs of these students with SLN.

E.)      You should be prepared to present your Lesson Plan Adaptation Project and defend your analysis to other students in class.

8.)      Complete a Resource Notebook, which should organize resource information and materials received during the course (e.g., class lectures/presentations/handouts, article summaries, Fact Sheets, Instructional Strategies, etc.) in a 3-ring binder. A Resource Notebook Checklist has been developed and will be used to grade the completed Resource Notebook.

 

Grading:
 

Course Assessment/Grading Plan:

Points may be earned as follows:                                               Points

§         Attendance/Participation (11%)                              330 (8 classes x 41.25 points)             

§         Learning Journal (14%)                                           420 (14 chapters x 30 points)

§         Reflecting Reading Assignment (5%)                       150

§         Differentiated Instruction     (10%)                          300 (10 chapters x 30 points)

§         Disability Awareness Project (20%)                        600

§         Professional Development Project (10%)                300

§         Reflective Essay (5%)                                             150                                                                                                                  

§         Lesson Adaptation Project (20%)                           600

§         Resource Notebook (5%)                                      150

                                                          TOTAL POINTS:     3000

Course Grading Plan:

The final grade will be based on the percentage of total points earned.

            A = 90 – 100%                        2700 – 3000 points                 

            B = 80 – 89%                          2400 – 2699 points

            C = 70 – 79%                          2100 – 2399 points

            D = 60 – 69%                          1800 – 2099 points

            F = 59% or lower                     1799 points or less

Late Submission of Course Materials:


ALL
assignments, even if late, are required to earn a grade for this course. Late assignments will result in the loss of points of 10% per calendar days x total points possible of assignment.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
 

CLASSROOM RULES OF CONDUCT:

You are expected to:

§         Attend class on a regular basis. Come to class on time. (See Instructor's attendance policy).    

§         Turn in assignments to the Instructor on time (see course schedule for more specific information regarding due dates).

§         Read, understand, and follow the course syllabus.

§         Use the ED 520 e-Companion (www.parkonline.org) as directed by the Instructor (e.g., announcements, gradebook, doc sharing, dropbox, webliography). Because this course is a blended course (i.e., using both the face-to-face AND online formats), to be successful it is imperative you become familiar with using the e-Companion website.

§         Submit all electronic copies of assignments as .doc or .pdf files, not .docx files. Submit assignments as directed by the Instructor; assignments submitted incorrectly will not be accepted.

§         Use the Foliotek electronic student portfolio to submit required portfolio-related assignments for Instructor review. When you have uploaded entries for Instructor review, you must click on ‘Request Review’ (green check mark, upper right-hand corner) and identify the specific Instructor who you wish to review your entry. The Instructor will be notified via email your entry is ready and waiting to be reviewed.

§         Access the professional education literature to complete research requirements in course assignments. If you are unfamiliar with Library’s educational databases (e.g., EBSCOhost research database; Educational Resources Information Center/ERIC), you are encouraged to make an appointment with one of Park’s Reference Librarians for instruction and guidance.

§         Check your PirateMail on a regular basis for current information about what is happening in the course, the Graduate School for Education, and the University in general. With Park moving towards using a "paperless" system, it is critical you be able to receive and send important communication via Park's PirateMail system. For specific information regarding PirateMail, see graduate catalog. If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024.

§         Complete reading assignments prior to the class session, bring textbook(s)/materials to class, and consistently contribute meaningfully to class discussions. You are expected to fully participate in all class activities, including lectures and discussions, demonstrations, presentations, small group projects, and any other type of in-class and online activities that may occur.

§         Conduct yourself in a highly professional manner. In addition to those guidelines about student conduct established by the University (e.g., cheating, plagiarism) and the School for Education (i.e., teacher dispositions), professionalism includes such things as establishing positive relationships and engaging in positive interactions with peers, colleagues, and instructors; attending respectfully to others who are sharing information with the class or group; and being flexible to unforeseen changes in the course syllabus.

§         Use current APA style in all aspects of written assignments (e.g., double-space, indent paragraphs, page numbers in upper right, correct in-text citations, references, etc.). Failure to demonstrate appropriate use of current APA style will result in a reduction of points for the assignment (i.e., minimum of 10% of total grade), as will style, spelling, and format errors. In professional writing, past tense is generally accepted. Avoid using contractions, personal pronouns, or slang expressions. You MUST use people-first language (e.g., individuals with disabilities; students with learning disabilities). You are encouraged to use the services of the Academic Support Center (Mabee 406, near the Library, 584-6330) for assistance in developing written reports and for editing and style assistance. 

§         Follow regulations detailed in Park University's Graduate Catalog 2010-2011, which may be accessed at http://www.park.edu/grad/Catalog/ParkGraduatCatalog2010-11.pdf, and the Handbook for Graduate Education Programs, School for Education, Revised Summer 2008, which may be accessed at http://www.park.edu/education/documents/HANDBOOK-Graduaterevised2008.pdf

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

Tentative* Course Map

* The following course schedule of topics indicates dates for readings and assignments to be done. It is tentative for several reasons: (1) class discussion may indicate content changes; and (2) as we progress, we may decide to devote more or less time to a topic. Subject to the above, we will follow the schedule. Unless we agree in class to a change in assignment due dates, they will remain as indicated.

Class

Session

Date

Topics/Assignments

1

Oct 18

Introductions

Review Syllabus

Topic: Overview of Course

Topic: Overview of Special Education

§ DUE: read chapter 1 in Exceptional Lives. Note: There will be no journal entry required for this chapter.

2

Oct 25


Topic
: Overview of Special Education (cont)

Topic: Special Education Process

§ DUE: read and complete journal entry for chapter 2 in Exceptional Lives

 Note: Bring copies of  Regulation III Identification and Evaluation, (pp. 18-39) in Missouri State Plan for Special Education AND Missouri’s Individual Education Program form (full version, 17 pages) to class for review.Topic: Writing Lab (Professional Standards)

§ Group Activity: Work on MoSTEP 1.2.3 Essays

3

Nov 1

Topic: Inclusion

§ DUE: read and complete journal entry for chapter 4 in Exceptional Lives

Topic
: First Person Account - Living with Disabilities

§ DUE: Reflective Reading Assignment on Embracing the Monster

Topic: Writing Lab (Professional Standards)

§ Group Activity: Work on MoSTEP 1.2.3 Essays

Class

Session

Date

Topics/Assignments

4

Nov 8

Topic: Differentiated Instruction

§ DUE: Read and complete study questions for chapters 1 – 10 in The Differentiated Classroom

Topic: Writing Lab (Professional Standards)

§ Group Activity: Work on MoSTEP 1.2.3 Essays

5

Nov 15

Topic: Students with Special Learning Needs – LD and AD/HD

§ DUE: read and complete journal entries for chapters 5 & 8 in Exceptional Lives

§ DUE: Exceptionality Awareness Projects

 Topic: Writing Lab (Professional Standards)

§ Group Activity: Work on MoSTEP 1.2.3 Essays

 

6

Nov 22

Topic: Students with Special Learning Needs – CD, ED/BD, ID, & Autism         

§ DUE: Read and complete journal entries for chapters 6, 7, 9, & 11 in Exceptional Lives

§ DUE: Exceptionality Awareness Projects

Topic: Writing Lab (Professional Standards)

§ Group Activity: Work on MoSTEP 1.2.3 Essays

7

Nov 29

Topic: Students with Special Learning Needs – PD/Orthopedic Impairment, OHI, TBI, HL, & VL

§ DUE: Read and complete reflective entries for chapters 12, 13, 14, & 15 in Exceptional Lives

§ DUE: Exceptionality Awareness Projects

Topic: Writing Lab (Professional Standards)

§ DUE: Final Drafts of MoSTEP 1.2.3 essays for Instructor Review

Topic: Professional Development Project

§ DUE: PD Projects

Class

Session

Date

Topics/Assignments

8

Dec 6

Topic: Students with Special Learning Needs – G & T, At-Risk, Students who are Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD)

§ DUE: Read and complete journal entries for chapters 3 & 16 in Exceptional Lives

§ DUE: Exceptionality Awareness Projects

Topic: Differentiated Instruction for Student Success

§ DUE: Lesson Plan Adaptation Project (Core Assessment)

Topic: Evaluation of Resource Notebook

§ DUE: Resource Notebook


Academic Honesty:
As a learning community, the University upholds the highest standards of academic integrity in all its academic activities, by faculty, staff, administrators and students. Academic integrity involves much more than respecting intellectual property rights. It lies at the heart of learning, creativity, and the core values of the University. Those who learn, teach, write, publish, present, or exhibit creative works are advised to familiarize themselves with the requirements of academic integrity and make every effort to avoid possible offenses against it, knowingly or unknowingly. Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 20

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct.  Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 20


Attendance Policy:

Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences for two successive weeks, without approved excuse, will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Executive Director for the Graduate School, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 24
INSTRUCTOR'S ATTENDANCE POLICY: It is important you attend every class. If you are unable to attend class, you must notify the Instructor the reason for your absence. Attendance will be considered in determining the final course grade. If you have two (2) absences for the term, your final grade will be lowered by one grade, for example, an "A" will become a "B". If you have three (3) or more absences during the term, it is strongly recommended you withdraw from the class and re-enroll during another term. Two late arrivals or early departures will equal one missed class.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .


Attachments:
ED 520 Bibliography

Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Content/Comprehension                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
Outcomes
5, 6, & 7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
The artifact demonstrated a comprehensive understanding of terminology (15+ words) associated with the differentiation process (e.g., content, process, product, accommodations, modifications, assistive technology, goals/outcomes, anticipatory set, modeling, guided practice, diagnostic, summative, and formative assessments). The artifact demonstrated an understanding of terminology (10 -15 words) associated with the differentiation process (e.g., content, process, product, accommodations, modifications, assistive technology, goals/outcomes, anticipatory set, modeling, guided practice, diagnostic, summative, and formative assessments). The artifact demonstrated a limited understanding of terminology (5-9 words) associated with the differentiation process (e.g., content, process, product, accommodations, modifications, assistive technology, goals/outcomes, anticipatory set, modeling, guided practice, diagnostic, summative, and formative assessments). The artifact failed to demonstrate an understanding of terminology (less than 5 words) associated with the differentiation process (e.g., content, process, product, accommodations, modifications, assistive technology, goals/outcomes, anticipatory set, modeling, guided practice, diagnostic, summative, and formative assessments). 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The artifact demonstrated the student's ability to identify the learning needs of a given student with SLN by using information in all three of the following areas, including a student's readiness levels, interests, and learning profile. The artifact demonstrated the student's ability to identify the learning needs of a given student with SLN by using information in at least two of the three following areas, including a student's readiness levels, interests, and learning profile. The artifact demonstrated the student's limited ability to identify the learning needs of a given student with SLN by using information in only one of the three following areas, including readiness levels, interests, and learning profile. The artifact failed to demonstrate the student's ability to identify the learning needs of a given student with SLN by using no information in the three following areas, including readiness level, interests, and learning profile. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The artifact provided abundant information to discuss the characteristics of a given disability and to diagnose the impact of those characteristics on a student's learning.  The discussion and diagnosis consisted of rich, detailed statements with lots of elaboration and explanation. The artifact provided sufficient information to discuss the characteristics of a given disability and to diagnose the impact of those characteristics on a student's learning. The discussion and diagnosis consisted of general statements with little/minimal

detail or elaboration.

 
While there was some information discussing the characteristics of a give disability and diagnosing the impact of those characteristics on a student's learning, the information was vague, unclear, and incomplete. The artifact failed to describe any of the characteristics of a given disability or diagnose the impact of any of those characteristics on a student's learning. 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
5, 6, & 7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
The artifact provided an accommodation plan that identified  two or more (2+) accommodations in each of the following areas on the Lesson Plans, including content, materials, instructional process, learning activities, and student product, to enhance the success of  a given student with SLN. The artifact provided an accommodation plan that identified at least one accommodation in each of the following areas on the Lesson Plans, including content, materials, instructional process, learning activities, and student product, to enhance the success of a given student with SLN. The artifact provided an accommodation plan in which there were no/missing accommodations for one or more of the following areas on the Lesson Plans, including content, materials, instructional process, learning activities, and student product, to enhance the success of a given student with SLN. The artifact failed to provide an accommodation plan that addressed any of the following areas on the Lesson Plans, including content, materials, instructional process, learning activities, and student product, to enhance the success of a given student with SLN. 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
5, 6, & 7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
The artifact provided abundant information to justify the selection of accommodations to benefit a given student with SLN. The justification consisted of rich, detailed statements with lots of elaboration and explanation. The artifact provided sufficient information to justify the selection of accommodations to benefit a given student with SLN. The justification consisted of general statements with little detail/minimal or elaboration. The artifact provided limited information to justify the selection of accommodations to benefit a given student with SLN. The justification was vague, unclear, and incomplete. The artifact failed to provide any justification for the selection of accommodations to benefit a given students with SLN. 
Professional Writing Skills Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
8                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The artifact as a whole demonstrated the ability to effectively communicate the differentiation process through the use of correct writing structures and document organization, which included a logical sequencing of artifact components (<5 errors). The artifact as a whole demonstrated the ability to effectively communicate the differentiation process through the use of correct writing structures and document organization, which included a logical sequencing of artifact components (5-10 errors). The artifact as a whole demonstrated limited ability to effectively communicate the differentiation process through the use of correct writing structures and document organization, which included a logical sequencing of artifact components (11-20 errors). The artifact as a whole failed to demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate the differentiation process through the use of correct writing structures and document organization, which included a logical sequencing of artifact components (5-10 errors). 
Professional Writing Skills Component                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
Outcomes
8                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Various components of the artifact demonstrated the ability to effectively communicate the differentiation process related to that component through the use of correct writing structures and internal structures (No errors). Various components of the artifact demonstrated the ability to effectively communicate the differentiation process related to that component through the use of correct writing structures and internal structures (1-5 errors). Various components of the artifact demonstrated limited ability to effectively communicate the differentiation process related to that component through the use of correct writing structures and internal structures (6-10 errors). Various components of the artifact failed to demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate the differentiation process related to that component through the use of correct writing structures and internal structures (>10 errors). 
Collaboration                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Outcomes
3 & 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
The artifact demonstrated a comprehensive understanding of the importance collaboration, including the recognition of various types of collaborative efforts and their effects on student learning, and strategies to establish and maintain collaborative partnerships. Solutions to possible obstacles/barriers to effective collaborative partnerships were also presented and addressed. The artifact demonstrated an understanding of the importance of collaboration, including the recognition of various types of collaborative efforts and their effects on student learning, and strategies to establish and maintain collaborative partnerships. The artifact demonstrated a limited understanding of the importance collaboration. While it addressed collaboration in general, it did not recognize various types of collaborative efforts and their effects on student learning or offer strategies to establish and maintain collaborative partnerships. The artifact failed to demonstrate any understanding of the importance of collaboration.  It did not address the concept of collaboration nor did it identify the various types of collaborative efforts and their effects on students learning. 

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Last Updated:10/3/2010 4:12:57 PM