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CA 510 Rhetorical Criticism
Donnelli-Sallee, Emily


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

Course

CA 510: Rhetorical Criticism

Semester

F1P 2010 DL

Faculty

Emily Donnelli, Ph.D.

Title

Associate Professor of English

Degrees/Certificates

Ph.D., English (Rhetoric and Composition), University of Kansas
M.A., English (Language and Literature), University of Kansas
B.A., English, William. Jewell College

Office Location

Copley 310

Office Hours

MWF, 9-12; Also by Appointment

Daytime Phone

816-584-6779

E-Mail

emily.donnelli@park.edu

Web Page

http://www.park.edu/deptofenglish

Semester Dates

August 16-October 10, 2010

Class Days

Online

Class Time

Online

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:


Foss, S. K. (Ed.). (2009). Rhetorical criticism: Exploration and practice (4th ed.). Long Grove, IL: Waveland.

American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Additional Resources:

 

American Psychological Association, APA Style Help: http://www.apastyle.org/apa-style-help.aspx

The Purdue Online Writing Lab, APA Style: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/

The Purdue Online Writing Lab, Recognizing and Avoiding Plagiarism: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/01/

The Purdue Online Writing Lab, How to Evaluate Sources: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/553/01/

University of Iowa, Online Communication Studies Rhetoric Resources: http://www.uiowa.edu/%7Ecommstud/resources/rhetorical.html

Brigham Young University, The Forest of Rhetoric (silva rhetoricae): http://humanities.byu.edu/rhetoric/silva.htm

German, K. (1985). Finding a methodology for rhetorical criticism: http://cas.bethel.edu/dept/comm/nfa/journal/vol3no2-1.pdf

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Course Description:
CA510-Rhetorical Criticism: This course discusses the general nature of both rhetoric and critcism, providing a basic conceptual framework for the identification and analysis of rhetorical artifacts and then survey contemporaary critical approaches. These include cluster, feminist, ideological, metaphoric, narrative and generative criticism. This class will be writing intensive. 3 cr.

Educational Philosophy:


Borrowing his terminology from rhetorical theorist Kenneth Burke, John Ramage calls rhetoric "equipment for living." Rhetoric is inescapable—we consume and produce it daily as we are persuaded, and as we seek to persuade various audiences for various purposes. Rhetorical criticism provides a lens through which we can identify, analyze, reflect on, and intervene in these communicative acts. Like any object of study, rhetorical criticism requires diligence and critical thinking. Instead of merely memorizing dates, titles, and terminologies, we will engage in discussion and application so that the rhetorical theories we study this term become practical "equipment" for reading, writing, and thinking.

  Instructor Learning Outcomes

  1. Analyze the aspects of the rhetorical situation
  2. Define rhetorical criticism
  3. Demonstrate the four kinds of critical thinking used in doing rhetorical criticism
  4. Explain the process involved in using each method
  5. Evaluate messages for meaning and appropriateness
  6. Evaluate published critical works
  7. Formulate a research question
  8. Synthesize information from a variety of sources
  9. Select the appropriate unit of analysis for the chosen artifact
  10. Write a critical essay
Class Assessment:

This class consists of weekly discussions, and a variety of individual and group writing assignments intended to aid critical thinking and application of rhetorical theory. The core assessment is a paper that demonstrates the ability to apply rhetorical theory to an artifact of your choosing. Our smaller writing assignments each build toward this core assessment so that each week of the course you will make progress (and receive feedback) on your final paper.

Grading:
   

Week

Assignments

Points

Week One

Discussion

10

Week Two

Discussion

Article Review

10

80

Week Three

Discussion

Group Method Paper 1

10

20

Week Four

Discussion

Topic/Text Section of Core Assessment

10

50

Week Five

Discussion

Group Method Paper 2

10

20

Week Six

Discussion

Methodology Section of Core Assessment

10

50

Week Seven

Discussion

Analysis Section of Core Assessment Paper

10

50

Week Eight

Discussion/Peer Review of Core Assessment Drafts

Final Draft Core Assessment Paper

10

150

Total Points Available

500



A

500-450 points

B

449-400 points

C

399-350 points

D

349-300 points

F

less than 300 points

Late Submission of Course Materials:


Initial posts to the weekly discussion thread are due Wednesday, midnight, CST, so as to provide several days for peer-to-peer and instructor-to-peer interaction. Late contributions to the weekly discussions cannot receive full credit. Papers are due Sunday, midnight, CST. When arrangements have not been made beforehand, one letter grade will be deducted per day for late papers. Check your calendar for potential conflicts, and contact me early to negotiate alternative submission dates. Please note that your core assessment (i.e., the rhetorical criticism paper) will not be accepted unless you have submitted drafts in progress prior to week eight of the course.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

Week

Readings

Assignments

Points

Week One—What is rhetorical criticism and how is it done?

Foss, Chapters 1 and 2, and supplemental reading(s) in Doc Sharing

1)      Discussion (initial posts due Wednesday, midnight, CST; follow-up posts by Sunday, midnight, CST)

10

Week Two—Neo Aristotelian rhetoric

Foss, Chapter 3, and supplemental reading(s) in Doc Sharing

1)      Discussion (initial posts due Wednesday, midnight, CST; follow-up posts by Sunday, midnight, CST)

2)      Article Review (due Sunday, midnight, CST)

10



80

Week Three—Theme criticism

Foss, Chapter 5, and supplemental reading(s) in Doc Sharing

1)      Discussion (initial posts due Wednesday, midnight, CST; follow-up posts by Sunday, midnight, CST)

2)      Group Method Paper 1 (due Sunday, midnight, CST)

10



20

Week Four—Metaphor and Cluster criticism

Foss, Chapters 4 and 8, and supplemental reading(s) in Doc Sharing

1)      Discussion (initial posts due Wednesday, midnight, CST; follow-up posts by Sunday, midnight, CST)

2)      Topic/Text Section of Core Assessment (due Sunday, midnight, CST)

10




50

Week Five—Narrative criticism

Foss, Chapter 9, and supplemental reading(s) in Doc Sharing

1)      Discussion (initial posts due Wednesday, midnight, CST; follow-up posts by Sunday, midnight, CST)

2)      Group Method Paper 2 (due Sunday, midnight, CST)

10



20

Week Six—Burkean criticism

Foss, Chapter 10, and supplemental reading(s) in Doc Sharing

1)      Discussion (initial posts due Wednesday, midnight, CST; follow-up posts by Sunday, midnight, CST)

2)      Methodology Section of Core Assessment (due Sunday, midnight, CST)

10




50

Week Seven—Ideological and Feminist criticism

Foss, Chapter 7, and supplemental reading(s) in Doc Sharing

1)      Discussion (initial posts due Wednesday, midnight, CST; follow-up posts by Sunday, midnight, CST)

2)      Analysis Section of Core Assessment Paper (due Sunday, midnight, CST)

10




50

Week Eight—Responding to rhetorical criticism

Drafts of Core Assessment Papers

1)      Discussion/Peer Review of Core Assessment Drafts (initial posts due Wednesday, midnight, CST; follow-up posts by Friday, midnight, CST—note change in due date)

2)      Final Draft Core Assessment Paper (due Sunday, midnight, CST)

10





150

Academic Honesty:
As a learning community, the University upholds the highest standards of academic integrity in all its academic activities, by faculty, staff, administrators and students. Academic integrity involves much more than respecting intellectual property rights. It lies at the heart of learning, creativity, and the core values of the University. Those who learn, teach, write, publish, present, or exhibit creative works are advised to familiarize themselves with the requirements of academic integrity and make every effort to avoid possible offenses against it, knowingly or unknowingly. Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 20

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct.  Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 20


As discussed in the APA Publication Manual, “Whether paraphrasing, quoting an author directly, or describing an idea that influenced your work, you must credit the source” (p. 170). Citation involves both in-text parenthetical citations and end-text reference entries (i.e., a paper that lists references but does not mark quotations, paraphrases, or ideas in-text is still considered as containing plagiarized content). Plagiarism is not defined by quantity or type or intention. Unintentional or otherwise, work containing plagiarism (discussion posts, papers, etc.) will not receive points. Plagiarism can result a failing assignment, suspension from the graduate program, or expulsion from the University.

When in doubt, always consult a reputable resource (the current APA manual first, and then trustworthy sites like the Purdue Online Writing Lab) and contact me or another graduate faculty for guidance prior to submitting the work for a grade.

Attendance Policy:

Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences for two successive weeks, without approved excuse, will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Executive Director for the Graduate School, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 24

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:

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Last Updated:8/6/2010 7:37:46 PM