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MG 495 Business Policy
Anderson, Russell C.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

MG 495 Business Policy

Semester

S1U 2011 LU

Faculty

Anderson, Russell C.

Title

Instructor

Degrees/Certificates

MBA-Webster University
MA-Education University of Phoenix
BS-Business specialization in Health Wayland Baptust University

Office Location

By appointment

Office Hours

0800-2000 Sun-Sat

Daytime Phone

520-241-1523 Cell

Other Phone

Home 623-466-0138

E-Mail

Russell.Anderson@park.edu

Russell.Anderson@dm.af.mil

Worltrav51@aol.com

Semester Dates

1/10/2011 to 3/6/2011

Class Days

-----F-

Class Time

4:50 - 10:10 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Strategic Management and Business Policy; 12th ed., 2010; Wheelen and Hunger; Prentice Hall; ISBN 10:  0-13-609739-1; ISBN 13:  978-0-13-609739-6.

Note: There is also an eText of the book that can be obtained from http://www.coursesmart.com/9780136097341  

DO NOT Purchase Strategic Management and Business Policy; 11th ed., 2008; Prentice Hall: ISBN-10: 0-13-232346-X; ISBN-13: 978-0-13-232346-8. This edition does not contain the correct cases for this course!.

DO NOT purchase any of the paperback books as they do not contain the cases.

DO NOT purchase the international edition of the textbook with the following ISBN: 978013234515-6 or 013234515-3, as it does not contain the correct cases for this course.

Remember, it is YOUR responsibility to obtain the correct textbook for this course before the course begins.

 


Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Additional Resources:
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
MG495 Business Policy: A series of business cases and materials dealing with a variety of problems confronting general management selected to illustrate the major areas of managerial concern: environmental opportunities and constraints, formulation of business policy, organization for business activity and marshalling of resources for achieving of the firm. 3:0:3 Prerequisites: EC141, EC142, EC315, EN306B, FI360, MG260, MG352, and MK351 or permission of instructor

Educational Philosophy:

I think that the goal of educating university-level students can only be achieved by presenting them with more than lectures, rote memorization tasks, and straightforward projects (i.e., traditional schooling).  In other words, an educator must move beyond the traditional model of schooling to a point at which students can learn effectively. 
When students come into university courses they are but a few steps away from their professional careers.  Although somewhat of a cliché, what is true for a business is also true for its employees, to succeed an individual must learn to be faster, smarter, more creative, and be able to learn from mistakes.  How can we prepare students to succeed in this competitive environment?   The answer is, at least in part, to move them out of their comfort zone by presenting them with realistic problems that have undefined boundaries and solutions and that require cooperation as well as competition.  The goal of this is to help students to learn to be critical thinkers and effective problem solvers so that they can be effective competitors in their careers.
My Teaching Strategy
To achieve the goal of helping students learn, an educator must have a teaching strategy that guides the delivery of the course content and specific tactics that can be used to achieve success.  Several of the principles that I use to guide my teaching activities are presented below.  
Preparation is Key
I believe that one of the most important ways for me to provide high quality teaching is to be prepared for each and every class period. As a student I observed many lectures where the instructor was ill prepared.  I vividly remember the frustration that I felt in those situations and determined that I would not exhibit such behavior in the classes that I teach.  Therefore, I always strive to be prepared by knowing the material, having visuals prepared, and ordering the class in a logical and consistent manner.
Know My Subject
A corollary to preparation is the need to know the subject matter.  To present course content adequately, it is critical to know what I am talking about.  This does not imply, of course, that I create a false façade to my students by pretending that I know everything about the topic. This is impossible in most cases. Rather, it is critical that I know the material well enough to help students see how the material relates to society, organizations, and/or themselves.   
Know My Students
A second corollary to preparation is to know my students.  When I say that I need to know my students, I not only mean that I need to learn their names so as to personalize my relationship with them.  In addition, I believe that to be an effective educator I must know pertinent information about my students.  I should be knowledgeable about things like their skills, their reasons for taking the class, and their expectations about the class.  This comes from something that I learned in a business writing class that I completed as an MBA student.   To write well, you must know your audience so that you can write to your reader. This adage is appropriate for educators as well.  To share knowledge that is pertinent to students, I must know their needs, expectations, and career goals. 
Individual Instruction is Important
I think that an educator should treat each student as an individual.  This comes from my recognition that the original role for educators was as a mentor.   The mass lecture that is so common in the university setting today was a later adaptation so that a greater number of students could be educated.  Although the lecture setting is a necessity, students can still benefit from one-on-one interactions with the instructor.  Therefore, I attempt to learn each of my students' names and address them as individuals in and outside of the classroom. This not only helps me to have a better rapport with students, but I am sure that it improves many students' self esteem and positive feelings about the course and the material presented.
Students Should be Encouraged to Participate
A corollary to individualized instruction is encouraging and expecting participation by each student.  The classroom should not be a venue for one-way communication.   An important part of the learning process is expressing individual opinions and receiving feedback about these opinions.  Therefore I use a number of approaches to encourage individual students to participate.  For example, I generally require that students in my courses earn participation credit via activities both inside and outside of the class.  Further, in all of the classes that I teach I frequently call on individual students to answer questions or respond to my inquiries.  Finally, in project-based courses involving difficult concepts I generally ask students to work on in-class cases and exercises.  I have found that practical examples help students to better understand complex concepts because each student will need to actively focus his or her thinking on the concept rather than passively listening to a lecture.
Quality Must be a Top Priority
I strive to deliver a quality product to students.  Quality is a critical part of effective teaching.  To maintain high quality standards, an educator must define realistic objectives, reexamine course content to make sure the objectives are being met, and implement positive changes that will maintain and improve quality service to students, colleagues, and the university.  One of the tools that I have used to incorporate quality improvement into my courses is a supplementary evaluation form.  This supplementary form includes both open-ended and scaled questions that deal with both general and specific issues that are pertinent to each course.  By monitoring and tracking these evaluations, I have been better able to monitor each course more precisely and tune each course as needed.
Make the Material Relevant
I think that to properly educate students at the university level, an educator must make the material he or she is teaching pertinent to students.  Often this means that material should be taught in such a way that each student is able to relate to the material and apply it to his or her life and career.  This can frequently be accomplished by providing real world examples and cases that demonstrate the concepts that are being taught.  For example, I frequently utilize current events to illustrate important concepts and ideas.  By discussing information that is in the news and relating such information to the course, students often maintain high levels of interest and are better able to see how the concepts operate in a real setting.  One very useful tool to accomplish this goal is the Internet because it can be used to show students web sites that illustrate in more concrete ways the concepts being discussed in class.
The Use of Information Technology Demonstrates Its Usefulness
A corollary to the previous point is to make the topic of information technology (IT) relevant by using it extensively in teaching and managing the courses that I teach.  It is somewhat ironic that professors frequently do not practice what they preach to students.  I think that it is critical that when I teach topics related to IT that I demonstrate its value by using it inside as well as outside the classroom.  Towards this end, I utilize technology in presentations, in contacting and tracking students, and in disseminating information and course materials.  For example, I often utilize PowerPoint, the Internet, and software packages that are being discussed in the classroom in order to make presentations or convey ideas to students.  In addition, I extensively use tools like e-mail to keep in contact with students and, in effect, create a virtual classroom environment. I make extensive use of the web to disseminate to student course materials like assignments and the syllabi.  As with e-mail, I began using a course web page in 2004 and have continually used this technology since that time.
Students Learn Best by Taking Action
Another corollary to the tenet of making course content relevant is the issue of activity-based teaching.  I believe that the best way for a student to develop a good understanding of a topic is to create opportunities for him or her to act rather than to merely read a book or listen to a lecture.  To do this, I incorporate numerous hands-on activities in the classes that I teach.  For example, as early as the fall of 1996, I have required that students in most of my classes build either individual or project web sites.  This is a very practical exercise that most students find to be very useful and which provides them with experience that helps them understand the difficulties involved in developing web sites.  This type of exercise is very practical and helps students to understand important concepts related to the course. 

Change is Good
To provide a quality teaching environment, an educator should be willing to change the way that he or she teaches.  I am open to change and constantly try to reevaluate the courses that I teach with the goal of improving the teaching environment.  In addition to changing the broader components of the course, I also try to vary the way I present material to students on a day-to-day basis.  It is somewhat counterproductive to use the same lecture style day after day.  Therefore I often vary the mode of presentation by using, for example, the whiteboard on one day, PowerPoint the next day, and hands-on lab instruction on the third day. 
Create a Fair but Demanding Learning Environment
I think that it is critical that students be expected to act responsibly, to learn to be professional, and to meet high standards in the classroom.  At the same time, it is also important to be fair and evenhanded with all students.  To achieve these goals I require that students adhere to deadlines, that they produce quality work, and that they act professionally in their interactions with one another and with me. To make sure that all students have the same opportunity to achieve these goals I always attempt to make my expectations about required performance clear both in written as well as verbal instructions.  In addition, however, I also attempt to be fair to all of my students by being impartial in grading and interacting with students and by treating individuals with respect. 
Research is Relevant
I think that the research that an educator is involved in is very relevant to teaching.  In my experience, every manuscript that I have published has been relevant to my classes in one manner or another.  In addition, the excitement that I feel in discovery cannot help but spill over into the classes that I teach.  Thus, scholarship and teaching are closely intertwined and are critical to successful teaching.
It's Fun to Learn
I think that one of the most fulfilling facets of teaching is the joy I feel when I see a student get it.  In general, students seem to express a similar sense of joy or happiness when the light beams on in their minds about something that we are covering.  In general, learning is something that is supposed to be fun for all concerned.  I think that the best way to learn is to make the topic enjoyable and to create an environment in which students can have a good time while they learn.  I therefore try to inject not only humor into lectures and discussions but also make projects fun and enjoyable.  In addition, I try to express to my students the fact that I think that the topics that I teach are not only interesting and important, but also that they are usually fun to learn.  One of the best ways to do this is to maintain a high level of excitement about the topic and express that excitement to students.  In this way I hope to spark the flame of excitement from learning in their minds as well.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Define the term “strategic management”.
  2. List four phases of strategic management
  3. List four basic elements of strategic management.
  4. Define the term “strategy”.
  5. Identify the five forces that shape competition as described by Porter.
  6. Explain what is meant by the term "competitive advantage".
  7. List three directional strategies.
  8. List the five stages of international development.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. Describe the benefits of stragetic management.
  2. Describe the impact of the Sarbanes Oxley Act on corporations
  3. Explain the relationship between social responsiblity and corporate performance.
  4. Define environmental scanning and its function.
  5. List the stages of corporate development.
Core Assessment:

All Park University courses must include a core assessment that measures the course's Core Learning Outcomes. The purpose of this assessment is to determine if expectations have been met concerning mastery of learning outcomes across all instructional modalities.  

For this course, the core assessment is a Comprehensive Final Examination to be administered in all sections of MG495.  This exam is worth at least 30 percent of the student's final grade and will test students' mastery of the Core Learning Outcomes (as listed on this syllabus) through definitions, essay, and/or multiple choice questions. 

 This core assessment is a CLOSED BOOK, CLOSED NOTES comprehensive examination that must be administered and proctored in the classroom and may not be given as a take-home examination. Students should not have access to the exam or its questions before it is administered. The duration of the exam can be no longer than two hours. 

 No calculators, computers, or materials other than a writing instrument may be used for the exam; this applies to all students, regardless of whether the exam is for on-line or face-to-face students. Completion of the exam is strictly individual; students may not work in groups to complete the exam. 

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

There will be weekly quizzes each class meeting. 
The group project, both oral and written reports, will be graded on a group basis. It is imperative that each student do their part in working with the group. The Mid Term exam will cover Chapters 1-6; the FINAL exam is a closed book comprehensive exam (covers Chapters 1-11).
The midterm exam is an OPEN book exam. The comprehensive final is not a take-home test and is a closed book and closed notes exam.
If an exam (Mid-Term/Final), or oral report is missed through an unauthorized absence, it will not be retaken. For a predetermined authorized absence, arrangements must be made ahead of time to take the makeup.  See your Instructor to arrange the make up.

Grading:

Item

Points

%

Notes

Weekly quizzes

110

11%

See course schedule & overview

Homework 100 10% See course schedule & overview

Written Case Analysis

300

30%

See course schedule & overview

Midterm Examination

120

12%

Week 4

Final Examination

300

30%

Week 8

Participation

  70

  7%

Throughout the course

Total

1000

100%



Grading Scale
90% - 100% = A
80% -   89% = B
70% -   79% = C
60% -   69% = D
< 60%          = F

The course grade for students will be based on the overall average of homework and tests taken during the course in accordance with the weighting of the various requirements as stated in the syllabus.

All final exams in all School of Business and Management courses will be comprehensive and will be closed book and closed notes. They will constitute 30% of the total course grade and will not be a take-home exam.  If calculators are allowed, they will not be multi-functional electronic devices that include features such as: phones, cameras, instant messaging, pagers, and so forth. Electronic Computers will not be allowed on final exams unless an exception is made by the Dean of the School of Business and Management.


The course grade for students will be based on the overall average of homework and tests taken during the course in accordance with the weighting of the various requirements as stated in the syllabus.

All final exams in all School of Business courses will be comprehensive and will be closed book and closed notes. They will constitute 30% of the total course grade and will not be a take-home exam. They will be completed during the test week in the period designated by the registrar or by the Proctor in the case online courses. If calculators are allowed, they will not be multifunctional electronic devices that include features such as: phones, cameras, instant messaging, pagers, and so forth. Electronic Computers will not be allowed on final exams unless an exception is made by the Dean of the School of Business.

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Late work will be docked 10% per day. There may be some situations where a deviation could be allowed; however, this is the exception and not the rule. In these rare occasions, late work will only be accepted on a case by case basis with instructor approval. The following applies to ALL late work, unless prior arrangements have been made with and approved by the instructor: All late work will be downgraded at the discretion of the instructor, up to 20 points for every day or part of a day it is late.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Case Analysis - As the course description states, Business Policy is a series of business cases. The ability to do well in this course requires that you are able to analyze and discuss real business situations. These cases are used to provide vicarious business experiences. They provide the real-world data necessary to understand strategic management concepts. Whether or not you have been introduced to the case method, the purpose of this discussion is to help you prepare cases more effectively. Some of you may discover that many of the reports you have prepared for the organization for which you work will look remarkably like the case reports you will prepare for this course. Good case preparation requires mastering three essential skills. First, analyze the business situation thoroughly and systematically.

Second, ideas must be presented as logically structured arguments. This forces you to build the report with a strong foundation so that its recommendations follow from the material that precedes them.

Third, communicate the report effectively. All three components must be present for the case report to be as complete as possible. Strategy cases require several types of analysis dealing with interrelated problems. In Business Policy cases you are not afforded the luxury of looking at only one portion of a company; you must consider the entire company. Try to adopt the role of a CEO and become a strategic manager. Each firm exists in an environment presenting opportunities and threats for the business. Treating the firm as a set of complementary capabilities and people brought together to fulfill an overall mission is the basic approach of business policy. Depending on how these capabilities and people are combined defines the relative strengths and weaknesses of the firm. However, only certain strengths give the firm a differential advantage. Identifying these competitively relevant factors is a critical part of the analysis. As the CEO, you will evaluate the viability of a firm's strategy and if deficient, consider and choose from alternative strategies so that the firm fits its environment and can achieve its objectives.

Tools that you should and are expected to use to assist you in your analysis of the cases are:

  • The Boston Consulting Group Growth Share Matrix – pp. 221/22
  • The General Electric Business Screen Matrix – pp. 223/25
  • Porter's Five Forces – pp. 110 thru 113
  • The TOWS Matrix – pp. 182 thru 185
  • Miles & Snow's Strategic Types – p. 117
  • Miles & Snow's Cellular Organization – p. 288
  • The Strategic Audit – pp. 163 and 34-1
  • Financial Analysis – pp. 366 thru 369. Also found in the Doc Sharing area

Preparing Policy Cases - When writing a Business Policy case report, you are required to follow the Park University Management Department Case Format. This format is clearly spelled out in the Case Analysis Guidance (CAG) document and the Case Analysis Format Template (CAFT) document, both of which are located in the Doc Sharing area of the course. Please print these documents, and use them in preparing every case study.

Format Requirements – See above.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

 NOTE: Week 1, 2, 3, & 4 Assignments are due on Friday of each week, NLT Midnight, CST/CDT, Week 5, 6, 7 & 8 the Team Leader for each Team  being  responsible for assignment NLT Friday of each week, NLT Midnight, CST/CDT and Case Study Analysis and Peer .

NOTE: The Week 3 Case Analysis Assignment is an individually prepared case analysis and the  Week 7 Case Analysis assignment is a Team Case Assignment. Team members are required to use the Week 7 Team Case Work area for all work on this assignment. Team members are requested to submit their assigned parts of the case to the Team Work Area as early as possible (Friday of Week 6) and are required to submit their assigned parts of the case to the Team Work area no later than Friday of Week 7. Further amplification and guidance on this assignment will be provided in the Doc Sharing area of the course.

________________________________________

Week 1: Basic Concepts of Strategic Management

Readings: Read Chapter One of the text

Personal Contact Information: Please e-mail me the information I requested in the welcome I sent to you prior to the start of the course

Agenda

Introductions

Student Responsibilities:

 Syllabus

Lecture

Discuss first Case Analysis Due week three

Quiz

Homework: Complete End of chapter Discussion Question 1-5 pg 63 due next Friday and research an article for discussion covering a topic in week two.

Week 2: Corporate Governance and Ethics and Social Responsibility

Readings: Read Chapters 2 and 3 of the text.

 Agenda

Review question from last week

Discuss articles

Homework review

Lecture

Quiz

Homework: Complete end of chapter strategic practice exercise 1-12 pg 128 due next Friday and research an article for discussion covering a topic in week three.

Week 3: Environmental Scanning and Industry Analysis

Readings: Read Chapter 4 of the text.

Agenda 

Article

Homework review

Discuss Case

Case Analysis: Case 24, The Haier Group: U.S. Expansion, p. 24-1 Turn in Friday.  NOTE: This case analysis is to be prepared and submitted as an individual student effort.

Lecture

Quiz

Homework: Complete end of chapter discussion questions 1-5 pg 166 due next Friday and research an article for discussion covering a topic in week four

Week 4: Internal Scanning: Organizational

Readings: Read Chapter 5 of the text.

Agenda

Article

Homework review

Lecture

Mid-Term Exam: The exam will be found under week Four.

Quiz

Homework: Complete end of chapter discussion questions 1-5 pg 200 due next Friday and research an article for discussion covering a topic in week five

Week 5: Strategy Formulation: Situation Analysis and Business

Readings: Read Chapter 6 of the text.

Agenda

Article

Homework review

Lecture

Quiz

Homework: Complete end of chapter discussion questions 1-5 pg 230 due next Friday and research an article for discussion covering a topic in week six

Week 6: Strategy Formulation: Corporate Strategy & Functional Strategy and Strategic Choice

Readings: Read Chapters 7 & 8 of the text.

Agenda

Article

Homework review

Lecture

Quiz

Homework: Complete end of chapter discussion questions 1-5 pg 296 due next Friday and research an article for discussion covering a topic in week seven

Case Analysis: None for this week.

Week 7: Strategy Implementation: Organizing for Action & Staffing and Direction

Readings: Read Chapters 9, 10, 11 of the text.

Agenda

Article

Strategic Practice exercise pg 296 in class

Homework review

Lecture/prep for final exam

Team Case Analysis – Case 17, Jet blue Airways: Growing Pains, p. 17-1 Turn in Friday.  NOTE: This case analysis is to be completed as a Team case analysis effort.

Week 8: Evaluation and Control

Readings: None

Final Exam  

Course Wrap up

Student Survey: Please complete the student survey this week. It can be found by clicking on Student Survey on the Park University homepage. It is very important that we hear from you concerning your suggestions for improving this course.

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog Page 92
Academic honesty is the prerequisite for academic study. Academic dishonesty is inimical to the spirit of a learning community. Hence, Park University AND this instructor will not tolerate cheating or plagiarism on tests, examinations, papers, and other course assignments. Students who engage in such dishonesty will be given a failing grade for that assignment, may be given a failing grade for the course, or expelled from Park University.

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog Page 92-93
Plagiarism, the appropriation or imitation of the language or ideas of another person and presenting them as one's original work, sometimes occurs through carelessness or ignorance. This does not make it less serious. However, students who are uncertain about proper documentation of sources should consult their course faculty member. If you quote or paraphrase someone else's work you must give the source credit through a footnote. This applies to your case analyses, your responses to the discussion questions, and to your peer responses to those discussion questions. Ignorance is no excuse. Do not simply download the contents of a web page or an article from the web into your assignments. Do not misrepresent someone else's work as your own. Such actions constitute academic dishonesty. When you quote a source, be sure to provide the proper citation following the APA Manual recommendations. Failure to heed this warning will result in a grade of 0 for that assignment, possibly a grade of F for the course, and notification of the appropriate academic dean for further disciplinary actions. Again, if you are uncertain about proper documentation of sources, please e-mail your instructor.

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95-96

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
Explain what is meant by the term                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Provides Porter's definition of the term, a thorough explanation of how a firm has a superior position to that of competitors, and at least one actual example Provides Porter's definition and an explanation of competitive advantage which supports the superior position of the firm to that of competitors Provides only a definition of the term “competitive advantage” No answer or insignificant explanation 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
Identify the five forces that shape competition as described by Porter                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Identification and description of Porter's forces and an explanation of how each force impacts the competitive environment. Identify all five of  the forces as described by Porter. Identification of less than five of the forces. No answer or a provision of  unrelated, insignificant data. 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
List three directional strategies.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
List of the three different directional strategies,  a description of each, and an explanation of the effect of use on the organization's plans. List  three directional strategies that may be used in planning by an organization. List less than three different directional strategies. No answer or a provision of  unrelated, insignificant data. 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
Define the term “strategy”.  Define the term “strategic management”.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Provide a complete definition of the term(s) and an explanation of how each term is used in the analysis of business plans. Provide a complete definition of the term(s). Provide a partial definition of the term(s). No answer or a provision of  unrelated, insignificant data. 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
List the five stages of international development.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Provide a list of the five stages and explain how the stages may or may not be evolutionary. Provide a list of the five stages in order of development. Provide a list of less than five stages and/or not in the order of development. No answer or a provision of  unrelated, insignificant data 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
*List four phases of strategic management. *List four basic elements of strategic management.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
*Provide a list of the four phases along with an explanation or description of the activities that occur during the respective phase.



*Provide a list of the four elements along with an explanation or description of  how the element is important to the overall management plan. 
*Provide a list of the of the four phases in order of  phasing.



*Provide a list of the four elements.







 
*Provide a list of less than four  phases and/or not in the order of  phasing.



*Provide a list of less than four  elements. 
*No answer or a provision of  unrelated, insignificant data



*No answer or a provision of  unrelated, insignificant data 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
List four phases of strategic management.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Provides a thorough, detailed list, description and explanation of the company's phase of strategic management, the elements being used, the competitive advantage, and a prediction of the long range effect on the organization. Using the lists and an actual company case report, identify the phase of strategic management, the elements being used, the strategic direction, and the competitive advantage. Provides incomplete list(s), and partial  or incomplete identification of the phase of strategic management, the elements being used, the strategic direction, and the competitive advantage. No answer or a provision of  unrelated, insignificant data 
Component                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
List the five stages of international development.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Submits a complete list, identifies the stage of development in an actual (or provided) business, and predicts the long range outcome or effect on the business. Provides a complete list and using the list, identifies the stage of international development in an actual (or provided) business. Provides an incomplete list and/or unable to use the list, to identify the stage of international development in an actual (or provided) business. No answer or a provision of  unrelated, insignificant data 

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Last Updated:12/14/2010 9:20:35 PM