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Education Major Version

ED 608 Assessment
Germano, Carol J.


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

ED 608 Assessment

Semester

F2P 2010 EDG

Faculty

Germano, Carol J.

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Office Location

Hawthorn Hill Elementary

Office Hours

Monday, 4:00 - 6:00

Daytime Phone

816-986-3385

Other Phone

816-365-4233

E-Mail

carol.germano@park.edu

carol.germano@leesummt.k12.mo.us

Semester Dates

October 18th, 2010 - December 6, 2010

Class Days

-M-----

Class Time

5:00 - 9:30 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Classroom Assessment:  That Teachers Need to Know  (5th Edition, Popham)

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
ED608 This course is designed to increase PK-12 classroom teachers’ or administrator’s understanding and skill in interpreting standardized assessments and formal and informal classroom assessments, and in developing appropriated assessments for classroom use.  The course will emphasize the connection between assessment, curriculum and instruction.  Students will create a variety of assessments for classroom use.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will practice the use formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social and physical development of the learner
  2. Analyze educational assessment from various perspectives including the classroom teacher, students and parents.
  3. Practice using a variety of assessment tools utilizing formal and informal assessment measures
  4. Evaluate the quality of various assessment tools utilizing nationally recognized standards including but not limited to validity, reliability, and absence of bias. Practice professional and ethical standards.
  5. Acquire the skills necessary to construct and/or modify a variety of classroom assessments
  6. Describe and utilize the foundational statistical concepts of central tendency and dispersion.
  7. Explain the implementation, interpretation and utilization of norm referenced, group achievement and aptitude tests including the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP)
  8. Communicate assessment results to students, parents, and peers
  9. Utilize assessment results to inform classroom instruction for a diverse student population
  10. Explain the professional (legal and ethical) responsibilities in relationship to educational assessment
  11. Practice theories and applications of technology in educational settings and have adequate technological skills to create meaningful learning opportunities for all students.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop an understanding of current assessment theory and practice
  2. Interpret a variety of standardized and classroom assessment data
  3. Develop a plan to improve classroom instruction and student achievement based on the data
  4. Compare and contrast traditional assessment with alternative/performance assessments
  5. Identify the characteristics and components of a variety of assessment tasks, including selected response, constructed response and performance events or tasks
  6. Demonstrate the ability to evaluate student work using rubrics or scoring guides
  7. Develop appropriate scoring guides and rubrics related to classroom assessments
  8. Develop an understanding of portfolio assessment
  9. Develop a variety of assessments (multiple choice, constructed response and performance events) related to district curriculum
  10. Develop skills in collaborating with peers to improve assessment practices
Core Assessment:

This course is designed to address issues relating to formal and informal assessment, teacher-made tests, authentic assessment as well as standardized tests. The core assessment for this course will determine the student’s proficiency in developing appropriate assessment instruments for classroom use, and in interpreting information from standardized tests to other professionals and parents. Reflections of each of these activities and a Power Point presentation describing at least one assessment technique and how it can be used to benefit students should be written clearly and concisely with logical progression of ideas and supporting information and no errors in writing mechanics.


Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Assignment

Points

Due Date

Attendance and Participation

20

Weekly

Study Group/Weekly Log

10

Weekly

Log due Week 8

Data Analysis and Assessment Implications

10

Session 4

November 8

Assessment Improvement Plan

20

Session 5

November 15

Written Critique of Teacher Developed Assessment

15

Session 6

November 22

Reflection Paper on Assessment

25

Session 7

November 29

Balanced Assessment

100

Session 8

December 6

Total Points Possible

200

 

180 – 200  =  “A”

160 – 179  =  “B” 140 –159  =  “C”

 

 

Grading:

        Total Point Possible:        200
         180 - 200  =  "A"
         160 - 179  =  "B"
         140 - 159  =  "C"

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Graduate students are expected to complete their assignments and turn them in according to the class expectations as shown in the syllabus.  Late work will be accepted, but at a reduced point value.  If and emergency occurs, please contact you professor and make arrangements to complete the work as soon as possible.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Graduate students are expected to treat others with respect.  Cooperation and collaboration are keys to a successful learning environment.  Classroom norms will be developed the first night of class. 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

         

Session and Date

Topic

Assignments

Session 1

October 18th

Purpose of Assessment

Classroom Assessment:  Chapters 1 2, 3

  1. Bring multiple item assessment
  2. Select an assessment you would like to  rewrite as your final project

 

Session 2

October 25th

Balanced Assessments

·          Selected Responses

·          Open/Closed Responses

  • Constructed Responses

Classroom Assessment;  Chapters 4, 5

1.        Write two constructed response items, with scoring guide that you could use in your classroom.

2.        Final selection of the assessment to analyze and re-write.

Session 3

November 1st

Scoring Guides

Classroom Assessment:  Chapters 6, 7

 

Session 4

November 8th

Authentic Performance Assessment

Classroom Assessment:   Chapters 8, 9

Due:  Data Analysis and Implications

Session 5

November 15th

Data Analysis and Implications

Classroom Assessment:  Chapters 10, 11

1.  Bring resources for Balanced Assessment

     Project. 

Due:  Assessment Improvement Plan

Session 6

November 22nd

Portfolio Assessment

Classroom Assessment:  Chapters 12, 13

Due:  Written critique of  Teacher Developed Assessment

Session 7

November 29th

Review of Balanced Assessments

Classroom Assessment:   Chapters 14, 15

Due:  Reflection on Assessment

Session 8

December 6th

Reflections of ED608

Presentations

Due:  Balanced Assessment Presentation

 

 

 

 

 

 

Academic Honesty:
As a learning community, the University upholds the highest standards of academic integrity in all its academic activities, by faculty, staff, administrators and students. Academic integrity involves much more than respecting intellectual property rights. It lies at the heart of learning, creativity, and the core values of the University. Those who learn, teach, write, publish, present, or exhibit creative works are advised to familiarize themselves with the requirements of academic integrity and make every effort to avoid possible offenses against it, knowingly or unknowingly. Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 20

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct.  Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 20


Attendance Policy:

Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences for two successive weeks, without approved excuse, will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Executive Director for the Graduate School, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 24

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Content - Acquire the skills necessary to construct and/or modify a variety of classroom assessments                                                                                                                                                       
Outcomes
1,3,5,9                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

3. Exceeds expectations – clearly indicates proficiency in the graduate student's ability to develop a variety of test questions by a cumulative score of 90% or better on all teacher made tests
 
Meets expectations – indicates near proficiency in the graduate student's ability to develop a variety of test questions by a cumulative score of 80% to 89% on all teacher made tests Does not meet expectations – indicates below proficiency in the graduate student's ability to develop a variety of test questions by a cumulative score of 70% to 79% on all teacher made tests. Shows no evidence of meeting expectations – Cumulative score of less than 70% on all teacher made tests or No evidence submitted 
Analysis(1) - Categorize, in the form of a rubric, the components for the answer to the extended response test item that distinguishes factors for grading the answer                                                                                      
Outcomes
1,2,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Exceeds expectations – More than four separate factors presented Meets expectations – Three or four separate factors presented Does not meet expectations – Less than three separate factors presented Shows no evidence of meeting expectations – No evidence submitted 
Analysis(2) - Analyze, from a case study, the battery of educational assessment and communicate the assessment results to student, parents and other professionals                                                                                         
Outcomes
2,6,8                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Exceeds expectations – Teacher is able to explain statistical concepts of standardized tests with 100% accuracy Meets expectations – Teacher is able to explain statistical concepts of standardized tests with 90-99% accuracy Does not meet expectations – Teacher explains statistical concepts of standardized tests with less than 89% accuracy. Shows no evidence of meeting expectations – No evidence submitted 
Application(1) - Construction of Select-Response Tests (4 binary choice, 1 unusual binary choice, 2 multiple choice and 1 matching test)                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1,3,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Exceeds expectations – No test writing violations Meets expectations – Less than three test writing violations Does not meet expectations – More than four test writing violations. Shows no evidence of meeting expectations – No evidence submitted 
Application(2) - Construction of Constructed-Response Tests (2 short-answer, 1 restricted response essay item, 1 extended-response item) without any test writing                                                                                          
Outcomes
1,3,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Exceeds expectations – No test writing violations Meets expectations – Less than three test writing violations Does not meet expectations – More than four test writing violations. Shows no evidence of meeting expectations – No evidence submitted 
Application(3) - Construction of a Likert Scale to evaluate classroom instruction for a diverse student population.                                                                                                                                        
Outcomes
9                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Exceeds expectations – No scale writing violations Meets expectations – less than three scale writing violations Does not meet expectations – More than four scale writing violations Shows no evidence of meeting expectations.  No evidence submitted 
Technical/Professional Skills - Using a Power Point presentation, the teacher will describe at least 1 assessment technique and provide examples of how it will be used to benefit students.                                                               
Outcomes
Technology skills 11                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Exceeds expectations- Fonts are easy to read, layout is aesthetically pleasing, Introduction draws audience in with compelling questions, content is clear with a logical progression of ideas and supporting information- elaboration and explanation Meets expectations- Sometimes fonts are easy to read but long paragraphs, color or busy background detracts from readability, Introduction is clear and coherent and relates to the topic, and Content is written with a logical progression of ideas and supporting information.  Fails to elaborate. Does not meet expectations- Readability is difficult too many different fonts, appears cluttered, Introduction shows some structure but does not create a strong sense of what is to follow, Content is vague in conveying a point of view and does not create a strong sense of purpose- cannot answer questions about subject. 0. Shows no evidence of meeting expectations

 
Professional writing skills - Reflections clearly explain professional responsibilities in relationship to educational assessment                                                                                                                          
Outcomes
10                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
. Exceeds expectations- demonstrates full knowledge with explanations and elaboration of professional responsibilities in regard to Procedural Safeguards in assessment for IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), practice of absence of bias in development of test items, standardized procedures in administration of standardized tests, confidentiality of information.
Content is written clearly and concisely with logical progression of ideas and supporting information, text is written with no errors in writing mechanics.
 
. Meets expectations- demonstrates full knowledge of professional responsibilities in regard to Procedural Safeguards in assessment for IDEA, practice of absence of bias in development of test items, standardized procedures in administration of standardized tests, confidentiality of information.  Content is written with logical progression of ideas, text is written with little editing required for writing mechanics. Does not meet expectations- Demonstrates limited knowledge of professional responsibilities in regard to Procedural Safeguards in assessment for IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), practice of absence of bias in development of test items, standardized procedures in administration of standardized tests, confidentiality of information. Content is vague in conveying information. Spelling, punctuation and grammar errors distract or impair readability. Shows no evidence of meeting expectations. 

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Last Updated:10/9/2010 2:43:36 PM