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ED 521 Introduction to Literacy
Greene, Judy Ann


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

ED 521 Introduction to Literacy

Semester

S2P 2011 ED

Faculty

Greene, Judy Ann

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

M.A. Special Education, B.S. Language Arts,
B.G.S Psychology, B.G.S English

Office Location

rm. 315 Copley

Office Hours

by appointment

Daytime Phone

816-584-6335 (main School of Ed office)

Other Phone

---

E-Mail

judy.greene@park.edu

---

Semester Dates

March 14 - May 7

Class Days

---W---

Class Time

5:00 - 9:30 PM

Prerequisites

None

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Blake, Brett Elizabeth, Blake, Robert W.  (2005).  Literacy Primer.  New York:  Peter Lang

            Publishing.  ISBN:  0-8204-7077-5

 

Freeman, David E., Freeman, Yvonne S.  (2004).  Essential Linguistics:  What You Need to Know

            To Teach Reading, ESL, Spelling, Phonics, and Grammar.  New York:  Heinemann.

            ISBN:  0-325-00274-6

 

Lyons, Carol A.  (2003)  Teaching Struggling Readers:  How to Use Brain-Based Research to

Maximize Learning.  Portsmouth, NH:  Heinemann Publishers.  ISBN:  0-325-00435-8

 

Walker, Barbara J.  (2008).  Techniques for Reading Assessment and Instruction, 6e.  Upper

Saddle, NJ:  Pearson Education.  ISBN:  9780131995864

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
ED521 Introduction to Literacy: An introduction to current and practice in the field of literacy. Current theories, professional terminology in the literacy field, theory-based literacy instruction models, classroom assessment tools, and current issues in the literacy field will be reviewed, and classroom applications will be stressed. Designed for graduate education students who have no prior coursework in literacy methods. A minimum of three (3) hours of practicum experience in the field is required. (Offered in 16-week format).

Educational Philosophy:

Teachers must be willing learners who embody what they hope to cultivate in their students—curiosity and joy of learning, courage to risk being wrong, ability to connect the classroom to the world around it as a desirable way to enrich and empower genuine mobility in personal, social, and professional life.  Teachers must also have at heart the understanding that little of value can be communicated without first establishing and maintaining an empathetic, mutually respectful relationship.  In other words, teachers must model what they ask of and expect from the students they teach; they must enter the classroom with a disposition toward teaching-learning as an “us-we” instead of “me-them” effort.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify and utilize professional language, vocabulary of literacy, and informal communication skills for a variety of purposes (e.g., research, professional development, teacher-student/parent relationship).
  2. Select, construct, analyze, utilize multiple methods and different types of assessment, evaluation, and testing suitable for a variety of needs, and clearly communicate results to a variety of audiences in facilitative manner.
  3. Identify, explain, design, and demonstrate models of effective teaching and learning of literacy modalities for content classroom, individual students' affective & remedial needs, and to facilitate higher order reading-writing-thinking.
  4. Read, observe, evaluate, and reflect upon their own and others' pedagogical philosophy and practice for continual renewal and improvement of teaching performance.


Core Assessment:

Final Exam:  Combined performance mastery task and summative knowledge test:  (a) Literacy Strategy Lesson and Demonstration of content area literacy strategy instruction, (b) Post-Test over knowledge & terms

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

ASSIGNMENTS:

 

  1.  Case Study Textbook Applications (CSTA) Prepare for class lectures and activities.  Students will search for relevant information using all assigned textbooks to “solve” each assigned case study.  You will also search online (“live” libraries are also acceptable) for relevant articles online from the following sources:  NCTE (National Council of Teachers of English), ASCD (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development), Children of the Code interview transcripts, IRA (International Reading Association), NEA (National Education Association), &/or your content subject’s professional organization’s journal. There are no assigned readings; this assignment simulates real-world situations in which teachers are often on their own in terms of how to help their students who struggle with literacy.   Two case studies, a model showing basic content & formatting, and a rubric will be provided in eCompanion.  Students will submit & share their CSTAs with the class in informal conversation sessions according to the course schedule.

 

2.  Readability Study:  There are two parts to this assignment—

 

(a)  Each student will figure the readability level of one text of student’s choice using the following three formulae:  (i) Fry, (ii) Cloze, and (iii) Flesch-Kincaid (in Microsoft Word programs).  The Fry and Cloze levels must be done by hand.  “Show your work” by hand-marking selected text excerpts or use word processor markings.  Cloze "tests" do not need to be administered to learners or other persons to earn points; however, they should qualify for actual future use in a classroom setting.

 

(b)    Write a brief report that compares and contrasts the formulae, and discuss personal conclusions regarding the use of readability levels.  Include all work such as calculations and drafts, and submit to instructor at the beginning of class on date due (see “Course Topics and Assignments”). 

 

3.  FIELD EXPERIENCE (OBSERVATION AND REFLECTIVE ANALYSIS)  Students will observe literacy assessment and/or instruction in active classroom settings, then analyze their findings, and reflect on the links to course content.  If you are not currently teaching, and need a field experience placement, tell me ASAP!

 

     There are two parts to this assignment.

 

(a)     Observation: Students are required to complete a minimum of 3 hours of observation in a variety of classroom settings.  Those of you who are currently teaching may observe other teachers of your chosen content subject, but you must also observe 1 setting other than your own, e.g., special services/specialist, an experienced inclusion teacher whose students have diverse literacy levels & needs, language arts/communication arts (if you teach math, science, social studies, etc.).  Use your KWL from the 1st night of class to guide your observations.  Take notes during observations, if the classroom teacher approves.  After each observation, complete a Post-Session Reflection Sheet to keep a record of what was observed and the links to course content.  A time log, signed by each classroom/services teacher, is required.  Be sure to include contact information for the school and the teachers’ names.  NOTE:  15 extra credit points can be earned by completing 5 hours of Field Experience.

 

(b)    Reflection: Students will summarize, analyze, and reflect on their field experience.  To encourage you to apply the essential content of this course, your Reflection may be in the form of a PowerPoint presentation, drama, video, song/rap, or a written report.  This will be what you submit for points toward a grade.  (NOTE:  this is your rubric; fulfilling each of the following earns full points, etc.)

 

§         Summary  = essentials of what you did & what happened

§         Analysis =

                                                                             i.      how what you observed/heard did/did not relate to what you learned in this class

                                                                           ii.      how well it worked/did not work

§         Reflection = What you would do if you had been the teachers according to what you learned in this class?  How worthwhile was your field experience?  Refer to your KWL from the 1st class session.  Did anything in the K column need to be changed?  Were you able to fill in the W column with any answers?  Does anything remain in the L column?  

§         Whatever form your Reflection takes, it must present the above components in an easily identifiable way.  Points will be deducted for each component I cannot easily & immediately locate.

 

In addition, you will share your experience with the class in your chosen format. 

“Shares” are informal, and should last no longer than 7 minutes.

 

4.  MoSTEP entries:  Student candidates must write entries covering the following:

 

            Quality Indicator: 

1.2.7:  The pre-service teacher models effective verbal, nonverbal, and media

Communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive

interaction in the classroom.

 

            Performance Indicators: 

1.2.7.1  models effective verbal/nonverbal communication skills.

            1.2.7.2  demonstrates sensitivity to cultural, gender, intellectual, and physical ability

differences classroom communication and in responses to students’

communications.

            1.2.7.3  supports and expands learner expression in speaking, writing, listening, and

other media.

1.2.7.4     uses a variety of media communication tools.

 

o      Entries will be evaluated using the SFE Portfolio Rubric and the DESE Rubric for Teacher Portfolios.  Each rubric supports the other; together, they are excellent guides for knowing what and how to write portfolio entries.  The SFE Portfolio Rubric is available in rm. 309 of Copley; the DESE Portfolio Rubric will be provided in eCompanion.  These are best used as resource guides, not for recording evaluation scores. 

 

o      Students will complete drafts of this standard for their portfolios.  You will address the Quality and Performance Indicators by writing at least 3 drafts for each standard.  Each draft must be submitted to 2 different members of the class for peer review using the SFE Portfoliio Rubric and Peer Review Sheets provided in eCompanion.  (I suggest you get a copy of the SFE Rubric from the main office in rm. 309 as it is a hefty document!)  Exchange your first 2 drafts & submit the third according to the due dates in the Class Schedule.  Points are earned for:

 

(a)     2 drafts, (b) 2 peer reviews, and (c) a 3rd draft revised according to peer feedback. 

 

(b)    Each of the first 2 drafts must be attached to a peer review sheet along with the third draft when submitted to the instructor.  NOTE:  the final draft submitted to instructor is still considered to be a draft and does not receive final approval.

 

5.  WRITING RUBRIC ACTIVITY   During a class session, students will evaluate two samples of writing using the writing rubric provided.

 

6. Literacy Strategy Lesson Each student will design a literacy lesson for his or her particular content area.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student’s own final effort.  This assignment will bring together previous assignments and activities to function as half of the course final “exam.”  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn; (b) use at least one comprehension content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.

 

Students will write a script of the strategy lesson/activity using the lesson plan format provided in eCompanion.  You will then present it in a simulated version of a lesson/learning activity that could/will actually be used in your own classroom:  Here is what is expected in your scripted lesson & presentation:

 

1.      Tell us the strategy & its purpose (Objective).

2.      Introduce it in the context of an authentic content subject task/assignment (e.g., analyze research, dramatize an excerpt from literary text, read source document & discuss an historical event, make connections among mathematical discoveries and their impact on local community issues).  This introduction should be done in  such a way that activates schema and motivates a desire to learn (Anticipatory Set/Advanced Organizer).

3.      Tell us new information we need to learn & use the strategy (Input),

4.      Demonstrate the strategy the way you want us to use it during our simulated lesson (Modeling).

5.      Have us drive our new knowledge/skills into long-term recall by asking us to analyze & evaluate the lesson/activity in an active, engaging way (Closure) 

 

Plan your presentation to be no longer than 12 minutes—the instructor will keep a timer.  Since this is a brief part of an entire literacy lesson/activity simulation, bring only those materials, e.g., paper, documents, etc., necessary to give us a good idea of what we would be using if there was time for a complete lesson/activity. 

 

The lesson will be followed by a debriefing discussion in which “learners” will give feedback to “teacher” using a provided rubric to help the “teacher” revise and improve the plan and teaching skills.  The instructor will also provide feedback in a rubric. 

 

Students submit a formal written Literacy Strategy Lesson using the provided format. 

 

7.     Pre- Assessment and Post-Test  During the first class session, a fill-in-the-blank, short answer assessment will be given covering knowledge, concepts, and skills essential to course objectives.  Results of the pre-assessment will be used, in part, to determine session topics and learning activities.   I’ll give your pre-assessment back to you, ungraded, the 2nd session so you can use it as a guide to study for the Post-Test.  The Post-Test will contain the same, but not all, items on the pre-assessment.  It is culminating, summative task, & is half of the final examination, and will earn a raw point score. 

Grading:

GRADING PLAN:  Points for final grade are earned as follows: 

 

F     WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT FINAL GRADES    E

 

NOTE:  final grades are calculated by points only, AND not BY THE percentage POSTED IN eCOMPANION. IGNORE PERCENTAGES IN eCOMPANION!!!

 

  • Case Study Text Applications

                  Finished CSTA (3 @ 55)  ……………… 175 (submit in form according to model)

  • Readability Study                                               50
  • Field Experience Reflective Analysis                  50 (must include signed log record)
  • Field Experience Share                           15
  • MoSTEP 1.2.7                                                     60
  • Writing Rubric Activity                                       25
  • Literacy Strategy Lesson (written)                    100
  • Literacy Strategy Demonstration                        40
  • Post-test                                                           50 pts possible         

                                           TOTAL POINTS:    555

 

Did you complete & reflect on 5 hours or more of Field Experience?  You get 15 extra (“insurance”) points!

 

A = 555 – 525 points     

B = 524 - 495

C = 494 - 465

D = 464 – 435

F = 434 points or less

 

NOTE:  one more time:  final grades are calculated by points only, not percentages.  Therefore, rely only rely on the point numbers and not percentages listed in eCompanion grade book.

 

Late Submission of Course Materials:

  • Assignments should be submitted on time even if student is absent (excepting emergencies).  Use fax, ask fellow class member and/or friend to deliver to instructor’s mailbox, rm. 309 on the third floor of Copley Hall.  Assignments may also be submitted by email to establish early/on-time submission, but will not be printed out; a hard copy is required.  To accommodate those annoying technology glitches that seem to occur all too frequently, you have until midnight of the due date to submit assignments on time.   
  • Late assignments will result in loss of 5 points.  (Students are advised to submit assignments before their listed due date.)
  • Assignments submitted on or before the due dates are eligible for revision for full points until 7 days before the last day of classes.  To support this policy, assignments submitted after the due date will not be eligible for revision. 
  • Each time an assignment is submitted for re-evaluation, the original or most recent draft must be attached with a copy of the instructor’s rubric scoring/written feedback.  The instructor will return a re-submitted assignment that does not have draft(s) and feedback without looking at it. 

 

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

  1. Demonstrate respect for yourself, your fellow class members, and your instructor.
  2. Be honest with yourself and others.
  3. Keep your sense of humor.
  4. Participate in discussions and activities, and invite others to participate as well.
  5. Respect the ideas and opinions of others, even when you believe they are wrong.
  6. Contribute to focused, productive learning. This means eliminating distractions such as all electronic devices, off-topic conversations, homework for other courses, writing in planners, etc.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

TENTATIVE COURSE DATES/TOPICS/ASSIGNMENTS

Week

Date

Topics/Assignments…………………………………………………………Assignments Due

 

1

3/16

?Introductions: people, syllabus

? Contact info/? Who needs a field placement?

? Pre-assessment

? KWL: as a teacher, what do you already know, want to know about reading & writing? (You will use this to guide your Field Experience observations)

o Lecture & Activities: What Is Reading? What’s Up with Writing?  Why isn’t son pronounced sawn? Why are we supposed to be quiet in libraries? 

2

3/23

TOPIC: This is your brain on literacy

? Uses of brain-based understanding of reading & writing

? 6 Modalities of literacy

? Bloom’s Taxonomy 

3

3/30

TOPIC: Why do I have to teach reading? Assuming I want to (or will have to), what do I do? How do I start? How do I know what students need? How do I become good at it?

? Readability/Readability formulae

? Assessments of reading/writing

? Informal classroom assessments: ? CLOZE, ? ITI, ? Authenticity!!

? CSTA #1 group conversation about Candace

? DUE: CSTA #1 “J”

? DUE: Exchange 1st drafts 1.2.7

 

STUDENTS SHOULD BEGIN FIELD EXPERIENCE!!

4

4/6

TOPIC: Why do I have to teach writing? How do I do it? How do I become good at it?

? 6 Trait Writing

? Writing rubrics

? Writing rubric activity

? Peer editing

? Future of handwriting

? DUE: writing rubric activity (done in class; there is nothing to submit)

? DUE: Readability Study

 

5

4/13

TOPIC: How do I become good at this stuff? 

? More strategies & activities

? The B & D of BDA

? QAR

? DRTA

? Vocabulary & concept development

? DUE: CSTA #2, Richard

6

4/20

TOPIC: How do become good at this stuff? How do I use this stuff in my subject area?

? The D & A BDA

? CSTA #2 group conversation about Jeremy

? DUE: CSTA #3 Jeremy

7

4/27

TOPIC: The world of the struggling reader & writer: ELL, gifted, dyslexic, & the generally dissed

? DUE: Literacy Strategy Lesson (written; so I can give feedback in preparation for simulation presentation

8

M-5/4

TOPIC: whatever we didn’t get to or didn’t do enough of

? DUE: MoSTEP 1.2.7 3rd draft w/previous 2 drafts attached to peer reviews

? DUE: Literacy Strategy Lesson Presentation/Simulation

? DUE: Field Experience “Shares”

? DUE: signed/initialed Field Experience Log Sheets

? DUE: Post-Test (did you use the Pre-Assessment to study? The only reason for not earning full points is . . . (I’m always amazed that anyone would fail this.)

 

NOTE: IF YOU SUBMIT ANY ASSIGNMENT AFTER MIDNIGHT OF THIS NIGHT,

 I WILL NOT LOOK AT IT.

 

Academic Honesty:
As a learning community, the University upholds the highest standards of academic integrity in all its academic activities, by faculty, staff, administrators and students. Academic integrity involves much more than respecting intellectual property rights. It lies at the heart of learning, creativity, and the core values of the University. Those who learn, teach, write, publish, present, or exhibit creative works are advised to familiarize themselves with the requirements of academic integrity and make every effort to avoid possible offenses against it, knowingly or unknowingly. Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 20

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct.  Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 20


Attendance Policy:

Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences for two successive weeks, without approved excuse, will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Executive Director for the Graduate School, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 24
Students may have no absences in an 8-week course.
• An unexcused absence will drop the final course grade by one full letter grade.
• The following will be unconditionally excused and require documentation:  medical or dental emergency, student's hospitalization, serious illness of close family member, natural disasters (e.g., fires, flood, etc.), jury duty, unexpected military call-up, death in family.  Documentation is required.
• It is considered standard professional courtesy for the student to notify the instructor by email ahead of time of any and all absences or late arrival/early departures (excepting emergencies).  
• In the event of an absence from a field experience/tutoring session, students are required to:  (a) call and personally notify the cooperating teacher, apologizing for the absence; (b) speak to learner being tutored, apologizing for absence.  Students must obtain the school and, if applicable, teacher phone numbers before beginning involvement with the class.
• The following will not be excused:  job schedule, wedding or other family event, other class schedule, and other situations that are avoidable by responsible planning.  If students are in doubt, ask the instructor first.  The instructor will uphold the policies set out in this syllabus.
• Late arrival and early departures of 15 minutes or more past the scheduled class starting and ending time each count ¼ of an absence.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

 



       
  • Assignments should be submitted on time even if student is absent (excepting emergencies). Use fax, ask fellow class member and/or friend to deliver to instructor’s mailbox, rm. 309 on the third floor of Copley Hall. Assignments may also be submitted by email to establish early/on-time submission, but will not be printed out; a hard copy is required. To accommodate those annoying technology glitches that seem to occur all too frequently, you have until midnight of the due date to submit assignments on time.   
       
  • Late assignments will result in loss of 5 points. (Students are advised to submit assignments before their listed due date.)
       
  • Assignments submitted on or before the due dates are eligible for revision for full points until 7 days before the last day of classes. To support this policy, assignments submitted after the due date will not be eligible for revision. 
       
  • Each time an assignment is submitted for re-evaluation, the original or most recent draft must be attached with a copy of the instructor’s rubric scoring/written feedback. The instructor will return a re-submitted assignment that does not have draft(s) and feedback without looking at it. 

Bibliography:

Adler, Mortimer J., Van Doren, Charles (1972). How to Read a Book: Revised and Updated  Edition. New  York: Touchstone. ISBN: 0-671-21209-5

Bennett, Barrie, Rolheiser, Carol. (2001). Beyond Monet. Toronto, Ontario: Bookation, Inc.           ISBN:  0-9695388-3-9

Beers, Kylene. (2003) When Kids Can’t Read. Heinemann Publishers. ISBN: 0-86709-519-9

Birsh, Judith R. (2005). Multisensory Teaching of Basic Language Skills, 2e. Baltimore, MD:          Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. ISBN: 1-55766-676-8

Blake, Brett Elizabeth, Blake, Robert W. (2005). Literacy Primer. New York: Peter Lang

            Publishing. ISBN: 0-8204-7077-5

Copeland, Matt. (2005). Socratic Circles: Fostering Critical and Creative Thinking in Middle           and High School. Portland, ME: Stenhouse Publishers. ISBN: 1-57110394-5

Duffy, Gerald G. (2003) Explaining Reading A Resource for Teaching Concepts, Skills, and

            Strategies. New York: Guilford Press. ISBN: 1-57230-877-X

Fountas, Irene C., Pinnell, Gay Su. (2006) Teaching for Comprehension and Fluency: Thinking,       Talking, and             Writing About Reading, K-8. Heinemann Publishers. 

ISBN: 0-325-00308-4

Freeman, David E., Freeman, Yvonne S. (2004). Essential Linguistics: What You Need to Know

            To Teach Reading, ESL, Spelling, Phonics, and Grammar. New York: Heinemann.

            ISBN: 0-325-00274-6

Gallagher, Kelly. (2003) Reading Reasons: Motivational Mini-Lessons for Middle and High             School. Stenhouse Publishers. ISBN: 1-57110-356-2

Goodman, Yetta M., Marek, Ann M. (1996). Retrospective Miscue Analysis: Revaluing Readers        and Reading.             Katonah, NY: Richard C. Owen Publishers, Inc. ISBN: 1-878450-85-9

Gunning, Thomas G. (2006). Assessing and Correcting Reading and Writing Difficulties, 3rd ed.

            Boston: Pearson Education Publishers.   ISBN: 0-205-44526-5

Harvey, Stephanie, Goudvis, Anne. (2007). Strategies that Work: Teaching Comprehension for       Understanding And Engagement, 2e. Portland, ME: Stenhouse Publishers. 

ISBN: 978-1-57110-481-6

Johnston, Peter H. (2004) Choice Words: How Our Language Affects Children’s Learning. Portland, ME:  Stenhouse Publishers. ISBN: 1-57110-3899

LeDoux, Joseph. (2002). The Synaptic Self. New York, NY: Viking. ISBN: 0-670-03028-7

Manzo, Anthony V., Manzo, Ula C. (1993). Literacy Disorders: Holistic Diagnosis and         Remediation. Fort             Worth: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich College Publishers. 

ISBN: 0-03-072633-6

McGuinness, Diane. (1999). Why Our Children Can't Read and What We Can Do About It:    A Scientific           Revolution in Reading. New York: Touchstone ISBN 0684853566

Mueller, Pamela N. (2001). Lifers: Learning from At-Risk Adolescent Readers. Boston, MA:           Pearson Merrill Prentice-Hall. ISBN: 0-13-191360-3

Pinker, Steven. (1994). The Language Instinct. New York: Harper Collins. 

ISBN:  0-06-095833-2

Sousa, David A. (2001). How the Brain Learns, 2e. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. 

ISBN:  076197765-1

Tovani, Chris. (2004) Do I Really Have to Teach Reading? Stenhouse Publishers. 

ISBN: 1-57110-376-7

Tracey, Diane H., Morrow, Lesley Mandel. (2006) Lenses on Reading; An Introduction to

            Theories and Models. New York: The Guilford Press. ISBN: 1593852975



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
2-4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

(a) LSL&D contains all of 2 and adds:  teach a strategy that can be used across content area subjects, can be used by classroom learners before, during, and/or after reading content area text.  (b) Post-Test has 100% accuracy for multiple-choice and case study application items 
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

(a) LSL&D specifically identifies the most essential, immediate skills & needs from the classroom scenario; specifically identifies individual, diverse needs of struggling and gifted classroom learners; teaches a strategy that logically and directly addresses the most essential skills and needs; provides adaptations for struggling and gifted learners; is likely to result in classroom learners using text to gain content knowledge and skills and/or conceptual understanding.  (b) Post-Test has at least 99-90% accuracy for multiple-choice and case study application items 
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

.  (a) LSL&D lacks specific identification of essential, immediate skills &/or needs from classroom scenario; teach a literacy strategy that does not directly address learners' literacy skills & needs; does not provide for individual, diverse needs.  (b) Post-Test has 89-75% accuracy for multiple-choice and case study application items. 
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

.  (a) LSL&D does not:  identify either skills or needs, teach a literacy strategy.  (b) Post-Test has less than 75% accuracy for multiple-choice and case study application items 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1&4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

LSL&D contains all of 2 and adds:  knowledge & skills from other Park course work; scripted example of the lesson 
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

LSL&D contains a combination of knowledge & skills, and the six literacy modalities that can be identified directly from course content to form an original literacy strategy lesson. 
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

LSL&D lacks combination of knowledge, skills identifiable from course content; lack one-three literacy modalities. 
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

LSL&D lacks  identifiable course content knowledge, skills; all six literacy modalities 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

.  LSL&D contains all of 2 and adds: (a) self-initiated seeking & application of peer rubric feedback to revise & improve effectiveness, (b) articulates Zone of Proximal Development, and specifically identifies & explains how student/teacher will evaluate learners' correct understanding & use of new knowledge, skills (readiness) during Guided Practice & Independent Practice as part of scaffolding instruction. 
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

LSL&D contains:  the two required evaluation components under unlined headings; specifically delineates a structure for student/teacher to scaffold instruction so that it is used to check for classroom learners' correct understanding of new knowledge, skills (readiness);  Self-Evaluation and Recap components allow classroom learners to check their own accuracy, and the value of the lesson itself. 
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

LSL&D contains one of the two required evaluation components and/or without a heading; has description but no delineated structure for scaffolding instruction that determines classroom learners' correct understanding & use of new knowledge & skills (readiness); student/teacher evaluates classroom learners' accuracy & understanding instead of the learners themselves during Self-Evaluation component, and tells students the value of the lesson during Recap 
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

LSL&D does not contain either of the two required evaluative components; lacks all evidence of scaffolding to evaluate instructional components to determine learner readiness. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1-4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

(a) LSL&D contain all of 2 and adds:  needed no revision to earn full points.  (b) Post-Test is 100% accurate for use of core content knowledge & skills responses. 
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

(a) Each LSL component: explicitly identifies & describes its purpose as stated in course materials with 95-100% accuracy; is dependent upon & supportive of the preceding & following component; forms a coherent whole that achieves its purpose successfully as demonstrated by successful learning performance of classroom learners.  (b) Post-Test is 99-90% accurate for use of core content knowledge & skills responses; has overall accuracy of score of 99-90%. 
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

(a) LSL lacks: explicit identification &/or description of the purpose of one-three component(s) as stated in course materials; consistent accuracy in identification and/or description of one-three components; consistent interdependent and/or supportive relationship to other components; coherent wholeness so that its overall purpose results in unsuccessful learning performance of classroom learners.  (b) Post-Test is 89-75% accurate for use of core content knowledge & skills responses; has overall accuracy of score of 89-75%. 
(a—Literacy Strategy Lesson & Demonstration)  Each student will design a literacystrategy lesson for his or her particular content area using the format provided.  Students may confer with and assist each other; however, this assignment is to be each student's own final effort.  Students submit a formal LSL using the provided format.  The lesson must:  (a) incorporate the three modalities of acquiring literacy:  text = reading and  writing, oral = speaking and listening, and visual = pictures/art seen and drawn, (b) use at least one comprehensive content area literacy strategy from the text or other source presented in class.



(b Summative Post-Test)  Each student will take a post-test over course knowledge, terms, concepts; some items call for responses that demonstrate desired professional teaching dispositions for literacy.

(a) LSL lacks: identification &/or description of the purpose of 4+ component(s) as stated in course materials; accuracy in identification and/or description of 4+ components; an7 interdependent and/or supportive relationship to other components; any coherent wholeness so that its overall purpose results in inability of classroom learners to attempt performance task.  (b) Post-Test is less than 75% accurate for use of core content knowledge & skills responses; has overall accuracy of score less than 75%. 
Technical/Professional Skills                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Outcomes
1, 2, & 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
(a—LSL&D)  The written component of the LSL will demonstrate student's ability to use professional writing skills; the demonstration component will demonstrate ability to use oral and interpersonal communication.



(b—Post-Test)  The post-test contains short-answer items that provide evidence of writing skills.

All of 2 and adds:  (a) LSL contains 0 minor technical writing errors for standard English; employs professional tone throughout (i.e., formal phrasing, no slang) excepting teacher script to learners, that is publish-ready & could be easily understood by teachers/specialist, and parents; professional and technical terms/phrases used in responses are -100% correctly used; adds discussion piece that lists and provides rationale for strategies considered & rejected.  (b) Post-Test contains 0 errors in technical writing skills. 
(a—LSL&D)  The written component of the LSL will demonstrate student's ability to use professional writing skills; the demonstration component will demonstrate ability to use oral and interpersonal communication.



(b—Post-Test)  The post-test contains short-answer items that provide evidence of writing skills.

(a) LSL contains 1-2 minor errors in technical writing skills, e.g., standard English capitalization, punctuation, spelling, grammar, sentence structure; content completely & correctly follows provided format so that identification of components is rendered immediate; professional and technical terms/phrases used in responses are 95-100% correctly used; contains identifiable evidence of understanding principles of facilitative communication through consistent, appropriate use of specific phrases and skills, as well as logical, and reflective rationale explaining process of selecting strategy and designing lesson.  (b) Post-Test contains 1-2 minor errors in technical writing skills. 
(a—LSL&D)  The written component of the LSL will demonstrate student's ability to use professional writing skills; the demonstration component will demonstrate ability to use oral and interpersonal communication.



(b—Post-Test)  The post-test contains short-answer items that provide evidence of writing skills.

(a) LSL contains 3-5 errors in basic technical writing skills, e.g., standard English capitalization, punctuation, spelling, grammar, sentence structure; content inconsistently follows provided format so that identification of components is rendered difficult; professional and technical terms/phrases used in responses are 85-94% correctly used; inconsistent use of facilitative communication phrases and skills as well as somewhat illogical & reflective rationale for selecting strategy; (b) Post-Test contains 1-5 errors in technical writing skills. 
(a—LSL&D)  The written component of the LSL will demonstrate student's ability to use professional writing skills; the demonstration component will demonstrate ability to use oral and interpersonal communication.



(b—Post-Test)  The post-test contains short-answer items that provide evidence of writing skills.

(a) LSL contain 6+ errors in basic technical writing skills, e.g., standard English capitalization, punctuation, spelling, grammar, sentence structure; content does not follow provided format, so that identification of components is rendered  very difficult to impossible; professional and technical terms/phrases used in responses are less than 85% correct.  (b) Post-Test contains 6+ errors in technical writing skills. 
Professional Disposition                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 2, & 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
(a—LSL&D)  The written & demonstration component of the LSL&D will demonstrate student's knowledge of and ability to respond appropriately to learners' cultural and literacy learning differences and needs..



(b—Post-Test)  The post-test contains items that allow students to demonstrate knowledge & understanding of literacy learning differences & needs.

 All of 2 and adds: written component and oral inquiry seeking clarification & validation of appropriate understanding/communication 
(a—LSL&D)  The written & demonstration component of the LSL&D will demonstrate student's knowledge of and ability to respond appropriately to learners' cultural and literacy learning differences and needs..



(b—Post-Test)  The post-test contains items that allow students to demonstrate knowledge & understanding of literacy learning differences & needs.

LSL&D contains clear/consistent use of phrases and nonverbal communication demonstrating recognition, sensitivity, & respect for cultural differences & values, as well as planning that accommodates for differences and special needs in academic capacity & performance levels 
(a—LSL&D)  The written & demonstration component of the LSL&D will demonstrate student's knowledge of and ability to respond appropriately to learners' cultural and literacy learning differences and needs..



(b—Post-Test)  The post-test contains items that allow students to demonstrate knowledge & understanding of literacy learning differences & needs.

LSL&D lacks consistent use of phrases and nonverbal communication demonstrating recognition, sensitivity, & respect for cultural differences & values, as well as planning for differences in academic capacity & performance levels 
(a—LSL&D)  The written & demonstration component of the LSL&D will demonstrate student's knowledge of and ability to respond appropriately to learners' cultural and literacy learning differences and needs..



(b—Post-Test)  The post-test contains items that allow students to demonstrate knowledge & understanding of literacy learning differences & needs.

LSL&D lacks attempt at addressing cultural and/or differences and special needs in academic capacity & performance levels 
Leadership Skills                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          
Outcomes
1, 4, & 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
(a) LSL&D:  Class time is provided to design the LSL, and thus allows students to demonstrate team work, collaboration, initiative, and creative problem-solving.



(b—Post-Test)  The post-test allows for, but does not call for, more than required response to items.

(a) All of 2 and adds: seeks to work with more than one student during provided class time, makes opportunity outside of provided class time to work with other students; poses questions and issues, then actively participates in discussion regarding answers/possible solutions; (b) adds question(s) or issue to required response to test item, then attempts to answer/resolve it. 
(a) LSL&D:  Class time is provided to design the LSL, and thus allows students to demonstrate team work, collaboration, initiative, and creative problem-solving.



(b—Post-Test)  The post-test allows for, but does not call for, more than required response to items.

 Student uses provided class time to actively ask for & give written feedback on rubric; uses provided class time to work with at least one other student in creating LSL. 
(a) LSL&D:  Class time is provided to design the LSL, and thus allows students to demonstrate team work, collaboration, initiative, and creative problem-solving.



(b—Post-Test)  The post-test allows for, but does not call for, more than required response to items.

Student uses provided class time to work with at least one other student in creating LSL, but does not seek feedback. 
(a) LSL&D:  Class time is provided to design the LSL, and thus allows students to demonstrate team work, collaboration, initiative, and creative problem-solving.



(b—Post-Test)  The post-test allows for, but does not call for, more than required response to items.

Student does not use provided class time to work with other student(s), and does not attempt to seek or give feedback. 

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Last Updated:3/7/2011 12:12:05 AM