Syllabus Entrance
Printer Friendly
Email Syllabus

ED 585 Emergent Literacy Diverse Soc I
Estes, Judith Lynn


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

ED 585 Emergent Literacy Diverse Soc I

Semester

S2P 2011 EDD

Faculty

Estes, Judith Lynn

Title

Assistant Professor of Education

Degrees/Certificates

BS Elementary Education
MS Special Education, Learning Disabilities; MS Psychology, Mental Health Services
PhD, Behavioral Psychology

Office Location

Copley 324

Office Hours

On campus: Wed 8:00 a.m-noon; Thurs 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.; available 8:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. M-Sat by cell phone

Daytime Phone

816-935-3375

Other Phone

816-935-3375

E-Mail

jestes@park.edu

Semester Dates

March 16, 2011-May 8, 2011

Class Days

online through e-companion

Class Time

online through e-companion

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Otto, B. (2008). Literacy development in early childhood: Reflective teaching for birth to age eight. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
 
Owocki, G. & Goodman, Y. (2002). Kidwatching: Documenting children's literacy development. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Additional Resources:

Learn to Read and Write (http://www.naeyc.org/files/naeyc/file/positions/PSREAD98.PDF )

Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classroom,” a research article on funds of knowledge found at http://escholarship.org/uc/item/5tm6x7cm;jsessionid=46888066894C26F5E20A6F907E550DCB#page-10
 
Additional readings as designated.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
ED585 Emergent Literacy in a Diverse Society I: The first course in a two-course sequence that examines literacy development (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) in young children and explores the implications for teaching practices (birth-grade 3). This course focuses on the socio-cultural contexts of childhood literacy including the social worlds ofthe home, the community, and the classroom.

Educational Philosophy:
The professor's educational philosophy is to encourage learners to share, discuss, and work collaboratively in a climate of mutual respect; thus to build a collaborative learning community.  The instructor will endeavor to design the classroom environment to maximize engagement.  In addition, a constuctivist philosophy will be demonstrated in that students and teachers will be co-researchers to further knowledge of the subject matter. Student engagement is not the professor's task alone; making responsibility for making the most of the learning opportunities of the course will also be expected of each student. A variety of instructional formats will be used including lectures, readings, and learning groups with the goal of motivating all learners to self-reflect and analyze how  new and/or enhanced knowledge and skills can be applied to his/her future educational practices.

In regard to philosophy specifically related to reading the following quote is one to build on: "Reading can be compared to the performance of a symphony orchestra. This analogy illustrates three points. First, like the performance of a symphony, reading is a holistic act. In other words, while reading can be analyzed into sub-skills such as discriminating letters and identifying words, performing the sub-skills one at a time does not constitute reading. Reading can be said to take place only when the parts are put together in a smooth, integrated performance. Second, success in reading comes from practice over long periods of time, like skill in playing musical instruments. Indeed, it is a lifelong endeavour. Third, as with a musical score, there may be more than one interpretation of a text. The interpretation depends upon the background of the reader, the purpose for reading, and the context in which the reading occurs" (Anderson Hiebert, Scott, & Wilkinson, 1985, p. 7, cited in Mason & Au, 1986, p. 3).

In addition, in my experience as a learning disabilities teacher and reading specialist I found a significant relationship between a child's social and emotional development and their confidence in and ability to read. I will make references to this relationship during our time together. It is partially due to my interest in this interplay between emotions and academic success that I veered into the field of mental health and then later behavioral psychology.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Examine and apply research on families and communities as contexts for literacy development.
  2. Analyze and apply the finding of studies of childhood literacy to teaching practice.
  3. Conduct in-depth literacy profiles of children.
  4. Identify the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that families provide for their children's learning.
  5. Advocate for literacy environments and experiences that help children and families see themselves as capable, competent, engaged members of literacy communities.


Core Assessment:

Class Assessment:
 

 

Students will participate in week discussions, including answer a question for each assigned chapter and answering two peer responses (6 pts for answer and 3 pts each for peer responses or 12 pts for each of 13 discussions or 154 pts total.)

Students will provide a weekly Lessons Learned in a discussion thread (6 pts each week, total 48 pts)

Project Description:
For this project you will identify a child with whom you will conduct an in-depth study of the child’s literacy capabilities. The purpose of the literacy biography is to develop a well-informed understanding of the child as a member of a literacy community that includes home and community. Based upon your observations and the course readings you will create a richly descriptive portrait of the child. (20 pts each for 8 project component=160 pts for project). Additional detail for each assignment will be provided through e-companion weekly assignment descriptions.

 Part 1: Researching the child’s “funds of knowledge.” Begin by reading Luis Moll’s article on “hidden family resources.” This article will set the foundation for understanding the home and community resources of the child. With the knowledge from the article, you will interview the family of the child. You will report your findings of the multiple kinds of knowledge and skills that families provide for their child’s learning and literacy development based upon three categories of knowledge: the material, social, and intellectual. In addition to reporting your findings, the information you gain will be supported by readings from the text and implications for your teaching. (This assignment addresses NAEYC Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and Professional Tools 1, 4, 5, and 7.) Due: Sunday midnight, end of Week 2

 Part 2a: Collect two artifacts for receptive language, complete age-appropriate  assessments, provide teaching strategies, and suggestions for family involvement. Due: Sunday midnight, end of Week 3

 Part 2b: Collect two artifacts for expressive language, complete age-appropriate assessments, provide teaching strategies, and suggestions for family involvement. Due: Sunday midnight, end of Week 4

 Part 2c: Collect two artifacts for reading, complete age-appropriate assessments, provide teaching strategies, and suggestions for family involvement. Due: Sunday midnight, end of Week 5

 Part 2d: Collect two artifacts for writing, complete age-appropriate assessment, provide teaching strategies, and suggestions for family involvement .Due: Sunday midnight, end of Week 6

Part 2e: Summarize your assessments from Parts 2a, 2b, 2c, and 2d. Due: Sunday midnight, end of Week 7

Part 2f: Communicate your findings to the family. Due: Sunday midnight, end of Week 8

 Part 3 Provide a reflection on your experience Due: Sunday midnight, end of Week 8

Grading:

 

Assignment

Points Per assignment

Total assignment

%

Discussion Questions

13 @ 12

154

42%

Lessons Learned

8 @ 6

48

13%

 Project Parts

8 @ 20

160

44%

Grand Total

362

100%

 
A=90-100%
B=80-89%
C=70-79%
D=60-69%

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Because this is an 8 week course that is being taught online students must take responsibility for submitting all assignments on time. Only in case of emergency will an assignment be accepted after the due date. This extension will only be granted with prior approval (before due date) by the professor.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Ethical Code of Conduct: The classroom environment is an academic/professional environment and the NAEYC Ethical Code of Conduct sets the expectations for behavior. (A copy will be distributed at the first class meeting.) During online discussions netiquette is expected to be followed as outlined by Park Distance Learning. Students are also responsible with familiarizing themselves with Park University's guidelines for Student Code of Conduct.

Revision of Papers: All written papers should be saved for the purpose of revision.  You are allowed to make one revision for each written project that is submitted by due date. The due date for the revised papers is one week after they have been returned to students. 
 
Mobile Phones and Messaging: Participation in class is essential for everyone's learning. If you must have a mobile phone for emergencies, students are required to turn to vibrate. Otherwise, all phones are to be turned off during class time. Text messaging is not permitting during class time.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

ED 585 Course Calendar

 

Week

Readings & Activities

Posts Due

1

·        Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topics.

·        Read “Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classroom,” a research article on funds of knowledge located in doc sharing

·        Read “Exploring biliteracy and beyond: Developing a case example of educational sovereignty” by Luis C. Moll (2000), located in doc sharing

·        Read Oral Language Development: Foundation for Literacy, Chapter 3

Post the following: Introduction,

response to 2 peer intros,

an answer to a DQ, responses to 2 peer DQ, a lessons learned reflection

2

·        Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topics.

·        Read and Signs of Emergent Literacy Among Infants and Toddlers: Observation and Exploration Chapter 4

·        Read Enhancing Emergent Literacy Among Infants and Toddlers, Chapter 5

Post the following: An answer to a DQ, responses to 2 peer DQ, a lessons learned reflection.

Project Part 1 Due

3

·        Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topics.

·        Read and Signs of Emergent Literacy Among Preschoolers, Chapter 6

·        Read Enhancing Emergent Literacy Among Preschoolers, Chapter 7

Post the following: An answer to a DQ, responses to 2 peer DQ, a lessons learned reflection

Due Project Part 2a

4

·        Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topics.

·        Read Emergent Literacy Among Kindergartners: Signs, Standards, and Assessment, Chapter 8

·        Read Enhancing Emergent Literacy and Beginning Reading and Writing in Kindergartners, Chapter 9

Post the following: An answer to a DQ, responses to 2 peer DQ, a lessons learned reflection.

Due Project Part 2b

5

·        Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topics.

·        Read Literacy Instruction in First Grade: Becoming an Independent Reader and Writer, Chapter 10

Post the following: An answer to a DQ, responses to 2 peer DQ, a lessons learned reflection.

Due Project Part 2c

6

·        Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topics.

·        Read Literacy Instruction in Second and Third Grade: Transitioning to Fluent Reading and Writing, Chapter 11

Post the following: An answer to a DQ, responses to 2 peer DQ, a lessons learned reflection

Due Project Part 2d

7

·        Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topics.

·        Read Literacy and Learning, Chapter 1

·        Read Theoretical Perspectives of Literacy Development, Chapter 2

Post the following: An answer to a DQ, responses to 2 peer DQ, a lessons learned reflection

Due Project Part 2e

8

·        Read the lecture which provides an overview of this week’s topics.

·        Read Learn to Read and Write (http://www.naeyc.org/files/naeyc/file/positions/PSREAD98.PDF)

·        Visit the International Reading Association (IRA) website and follow directions provided in this week’s assignment.

Post the following: An answer to a DQ, responses to 2 peer DQ, a lessons learned reflection

Due Project Part 2f: Two artifacts, each with a reflective commentary, Project Part 3

Academic Honesty:
As a learning community, the University upholds the highest standards of academic integrity in all its academic activities, by faculty, staff, administrators and students. Academic integrity involves much more than respecting intellectual property rights. It lies at the heart of learning, creativity, and the core values of the University. Those who learn, teach, write, publish, present, or exhibit creative works are advised to familiarize themselves with the requirements of academic integrity and make every effort to avoid possible offenses against it, knowingly or unknowingly. Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 20

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct.  Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 20


Attendance Policy:

Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences for two successive weeks, without approved excuse, will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Executive Director for the Graduate School, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 24
Given that this class is being taught online, attendance will be recorded as "present" when online assignments are completed for the week.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:3/9/2011 12:40:53 PM