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Education Major Version

ED 608 Assessment
Singer, James D.


Mission Statement: The mission of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Park University is to provide leadership and directions to Park University's graduate and professional programs to assure that they are specialized, scholarly, innovative, and designed to educate students to be creative, independent, and lifelong learners within the context of a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University's School of Graduate and Professional Studies will be an international leader in providing innovative graduate and professional educational opportunities to learners within a global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

ED 608 Assessment

Semester

U1P 2011 DL

Faculty

Singer, James D.

Title

Director of Graduate Programs, Associate Professor

Degrees/Certificates

PhD--Administration and Foundations--Kansas State University
MEd--Administration, Washburn University
BEd--Education--Washburn University

Office Location

Suite 919, Downtown Campus

Office Hours

M-Thursday, 9:00-3:00 by appointment

Daytime Phone

816-559-5626

Other Phone

816-223-9385

E-Mail

jsinger@park.edu

jsinger@kc.rr.com

Semester Dates

June 6-July 31, 2011

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
   Classroom Assessment: What Teachers Need to Know , 6th Edition, W. James Popham; Pearson Education, INC., publishing as Allyn & Bacon, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-700235-1 (ISBN-10: 0-13-700235-1)

 

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

Additional Resources for all MAT, Ed Leadership and Language and Literacy students:    Electronic Portfolio

(Foliotek www.foliotek.com)

 

Students in the MAT, Ed Leadership and Language and Literacy programs are required to complete a portfolio and must purchase a license to use the Foliotek electronic portfolio for their School for Education (SFE) portfolio, a graduation requirement; a license may be purchased for 3 yrs. - $87.00, 2 yrs. - $59.00, or 1 yr - $30.00.

 

To make arrangements to purchase a Foliotek license, you must contact Carol Williams via email at Carol.Williams@park.edu and provide your full name, student ID number, program (i.e., MAT Program), # of years you wish to purchase the Foliotek license, and an email address where you wish to be contacted. Within a few days, you will receive an email from Foliotek with online purchasing information. Upon receipt of this email, purchase your Foliotek contract. Upon receipt of your payment, you will receive your login information from Foliotek. You must then send a final email to Carol Williams (Carol.Williams@park.edu) requesting she provide your current education professors and academic advisor - list them - access to view your portfolio. It is imperative you complete this final step!!


McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
ED608 Assessment: A study of qualitative and quantitative tests and measurements including naturalistic, case study, and longitudinal methods of assessment. A minimum of three (3) hours of practicum experience in the field is required.

Educational Philosophy:

The instructor’s role is to provide students with the opportunity to collaboratively interact in researching, presenting, discussing and applying information related to the course objectives. The instructor will provide a variety of learning and assessment opportunities including- writings, activities, dialogues, readings, examinations, and presentations.

 

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will practice the use formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social and physical development of the learner
  2. Analyze educational assessment from various perspectives including the classroom teacher, students and parents.
  3. Practice using a variety of assessment tools utilizing formal and informal assessment measures
  4. Evaluate the quality of various assessment tools utilizing nationally recognized standards including but not limited to validity, reliability, and absence of bias. Practice professional and ethical standards.
  5. Acquire the skills necessary to construct and/or modify a variety of classroom assessments
  6. Describe and utilize the foundational statistical concepts of central tendency and dispersion.
  7. Explain the implementation, interpretation and utilization of norm referenced, group achievement and aptitude tests including the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP)
  8. Communicate assessment results to students, parents, and peers
  9. Utilize assessment results to inform classroom instruction for a diverse student population
  10. Explain the professional (legal and ethical) responsibilities in relationship to educational assessment
  11. Practice theories and applications of technology in educational settings and have adequate technological skills to create meaningful learning opportunities for all students.


Core Assessment:

This course is designed to address issues relating to formal and informal assessment, teacher-made tests, authentic assessment as well as standardized tests. The core assessment for this course will determine the student’s proficiency in developing appropriate assessment instruments for classroom use, and in interpreting information from standardized tests to other professionals and parents. Reflections of each of these activities and a Power Point presentation describing at least one assessment technique and how it can be used to benefit students should be written clearly and concisely with logical progression of ideas and supporting information and no errors in writing mechanics.


Link to Class Rubric

Grading:

Unit Points warded For: Total

Unit 1

Discussion, Activities

60

                    Unit 2

              Discussion, Activities

                            50

Unit 3

Discussion, Activities

50

Unit 4

Discussion, Activities

50

Unit 5

Discussion, Activities

50

Unit 6

Discussion, Activities

40

Unit 7

Discussion, Activities

50

Unit 8

Discussion, Activities, Project, Final

350

Total points

 

700

Late Submission of Course Materials:
 

Graduate students are expected to complete their assignments and turn them in according to the class expectations as shown in the syllabus.  Late work will be accepted, but at a reduced point value.  If and emergency occurs, please contact you professor and make arrangements to complete the work as soon as possible.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Graduate students are expected to treat others with respect.  Cooperation and collaboration are keys to a successful learning environment.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

Week 1

TOPICS:

·        Why do Teachers Need to Know about Assessment

·        Deciding What to Assess and How to Assess It

·        Reliability of Assessment

CORE LEARNING OUTCOMES for Week I

·        Gain a working knowledge of basic assessment terminology

·        Identify the various purposes of assessment

·        Use descriptive and correlation statistics in the interpretation of assessment results

·        Interpret standardized tests, be able to communicate results to parents, and utilize results to inform instruction 

Week 1 Assignments

START HERE

1.      Introduce yourself in the INTRODUCTIONS section under the COURSE HOME.

2.      Familiarize yourself with the online eCollege platform so you can navigate around easily in it. (I suggest you simply CLICK around on the various buttons and see what you find. The system is intuitive and straightforward. Also, please don't hesitate to e-mail me or call me if you have questions. The helpdesk is also a ready resource for you.)

3.      Read over the SYLLABUS to make sure you understand the course expectations.

READ: Chapters 1, 2 & 3 in Classroom Assessment. Most weeks you will only read two chapters, but this week you will be responsible for three. This is a week with several things to do so it will help if you can get started as early in the week.

DISCUSSION: Before you start on the discussion for this week, you’ll be asked check out a Judith Dodge article on formative assessment. 

Posting: For each of the chapters you read, and the article, you will need to post a Response to the ReadingThe responses should be brief and explain at least one idea or major point you got from each chapter, and the article. Responses should be posted by Wednesday midnight each week. Three chapters and an article assigned during week means you will post four ideas from the reading this week responses. 

By Friday midnight of each week you will need to comment on at least one classmate’s response to the reading. Commenting on more than one will enhance the discussion, so please feel free to comment on more than one.

ACTIVITIES:

ACTIVITY 1: Ponder time – You will select one of the questions and respond by posting your answer by Saturday midnight.   By Sunday midnight, you should read the posting of your peers and respond to at least one. (You’ll be asked to do this most weeks.)

ACTIVITY 2: Locate a teacher developed assessment, like a unit test, or a quarterly final that covers content in one of the subjects you teach. This could include a district developed assessment, or one developed collaborative by a group of teachers. It should be a test that you would like to revise as a final project for this class. You’ll start working on revising it next week, so it is important to locate it this week.

If you are not now currently teaching, you may be able to locate an assessment you can use on the internet, or borrow one if you work in a school setting. You do not need to post anything for this activity for Unit 1

 

Week 2: 

TOPICS

·        Validity

·        Absence of Bias

CORE LEARNING OUTCOMES for Unit 2

·        Gain a working knowledge of basic assessment terminology (validity, Reliability, and absences of bias)

·        Identify the most common uses of assessment terms and their application

·        Use descriptive and correlation statistics in the interpretation of assessment results

·        Implement fair qualitative and quantitative grading procedures

·        Interpret standardized tests, be able to communicate results to parents, and utilize results to inform instruction 

Week 2 Assignments:

READ: Chapters 5 & 6 in Classroom Assessment. 

DISCUSSION: For each chapter read, you will need to post a response to the reading. The responses should be brief and explain at least one idea or major point you got from each chapter. Responses to the chapters should be posted by Wednesday midnight each week. Two chapters during week two means you will post a response that contains one idea from each of the two chapters. In addition, you will post a response to No Child Left Behind.

By Friday midnight of each week you will need to comment on at least one additional person’s response to the reading.

ACTIVITIES

Activity 1: Ponder time – Select one of the questions listed and respond by posting your answer by Friday midnight. By Sunday midnight, you should read the postings of your peers and respond to at least one. (You’ll be asked to do this each week.)

Activity 2: You should have located a classroom assessment in your content area that you will revise and use as your final project. You should start analyzing your test this week in Activity 2. 

 

Week 3:

TOPICS

·        Selected Response Tests

·        Constructed Response Tests

·        Performance Assessments

CORE LEARNING OUTCOMES for Week 3

·        Gain a working knowledge of basic assessment terminology

·        Develop assessment techniques to measure psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains and relate assessment to course objectives and instruction

·        Develop effective objective, subjective, and essay items and utilize item analysis to improve assessment measures

·        Interpret standardized tests, be able to communicate results to parents, and utilize results to inform instruction 

Unit 3 Assignments:

READ: Chapters 6, 7 & 8 in Classroom Assessment. 

VIEW VIDEOS: Follow the links below to see some brief videos of Performance Assessment in Action. You may watch either the first three videos or the last one. For the first two, read the brief content on the web pages, then watch the videos, along with the third video. If you are really interested you welcome to watch all four, but you may do the three together or the single video by Linda Darling Hammond.

http://www.league.org/gettingresults/web/module6/assessing/assessing_performance_video.html

http://www.league.org/gettingresults/web/module6/assessing/providing_feedback_video.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WW04F113nIY&feature=related

 OR      

 For a more comprehensive overview and a broader perspective watch this video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpTT_ewXmKI&feature=related

DISCUSSION: For each chapter read and the videos that go with Chapter 8 you will need to post a response to the reading. The responses should be brief and explain at least one idea or major point you got from each chapter and what it means to you and your teaching. Responses to the chapters should be posted by Wednesday midnight each week. Three chapters assigned for this week means you will post three responses and explain three ideas/points. The videos are related to the performance assessments covered in Chapter 8 so you may cover that content in your response to Chapter 8.

By Friday midnight of each week you will need to comment on at least one additional person’s response to the reading.

ACTIVITIES:

Activity 1: Ponder time – Select one of the questions, one that not more than one other person has selected and respond to it by posting your answer by Friday midnight. By Sunday midnight, you should read the postings of your peers and respond to at least one. You may respond to as many as you’d like.   (You’ll be asked to do this each week.)

Activity 2: Your assessment project – Look over the assessment you chose and compare the questions to the standards for your state. Post your analysis of the assessment, explaining how well it covers the standards/outcomes by Thursday midnight. By Sunday midnight, you should read the postings of your peers and respond to at least one. You may respond to as many as you’d like.  

Week 4

TOPICS

·       Portfolio Assessment

·       Affective Assessment

CORE LEARNING OUTCOMES for Week 4

·        Gain a working knowledge of basic assessment terminology

·        Identify the various purposes of portfolio assessment

·        Identify the various purposes of affective assessment

·        Develop assessment techniques to measure psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains and relate assessment to course objectives and instruction

·        Develop an understanding the principles of mastery learning.

·        Analyze sample classroom data.

·        Implement fair qualitative and quantitative grading procedures including authentic/portfolio assessments

Week 4 Assignments:

READ: Chapters 9 & 10 in Classroom Assessment. 

VIEW VIDEOS: For Unit 4, view the following brief videos on Portfolio Assessment:

Using Portfolios as An Assessment Tool:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=moomu5XBf8s&feature=related

Portfolios

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oseUgxghae4&feature=related  

Student Writing Portfolios

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPwqK1moIHA&feature=related

Using Portfolios to Assess Student Learning

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5N7KZFRL7mI&feature=related

DISCUSSION: For each chapter read, you will need to post a response to the reading. The responses should be brief and explain at least one idea or major point you got from each chapter, and something you learned from any of the four videos on Portfolio Assessment. The responses should be brief and explain at least one idea or major point you got from each chapter, what it means to you, and the impact it might have on your teaching. Responses to the chapters should be posted by Wednesday midnight each week Responses to the chapters should be posted by Wednesday midnight each week. Two chapters and the videos this week means you will post three responses.

By Friday midnight of each week you will need to comment on at least one additional person’s response to the reading.

ACTIVITIES:

Activity 1: Ponder time – Select one of the questions in the Activities 1 thread and respond by posting your answer by Friday midnight. By Sunday midnight, you should read the postings of your peers and respond to at least one. (You’ll be asked to do this each week.)

Activity 2: The second activity for this week involved an analysis of some of the assessment result for a fictional 8th grade social studies classroom. You will cover a variety of issued in the analysis. It will also involve developing an understanding of “mastery” as it applies to learning outcomes. 

Post your analysis (i.e. response to the questions) by Thursday midnightBy Sunday midnight, you should read the postings of your peers and respond to at least one. You should begin to think about how you want to change the assessment you are completing for your final assessment project.

Week 5

TOPICS: 

·        Improving Teacher Developed Assessments

·       Formative Assessment

CORE LEARNING OUTCOMES for Week 5

·        Gain a working knowledge of basic assessment terminology  

·        Identify the various purposes of formative assessment

·        Identify appropriate, measurable goals, and learner outcomes using the taxonomy of instructional objectives

·        Develop assessment techniques to measure the cognitive domain and relate assessment to course objectives and instruction and assessment

·        Develop effective objective, subjective, and constructed response (essay items) and utilize item analysis to improve assessment measures Develop an understanding of mastery learning.

·        Apply the principles of mastery learning

·        Evaluate a variety of assessment items for consistency, reliability and alignment to learner outcomes

·        Implement fair qualitative and quantitative formative assessment procedures to assist in determining student progress grading

Week 5 Assignments:

READ: Chapters 11 & 12 in Classroom Assessment. 

RESEARCH: This week you will do some research on your own. Your assignment is to do a web search and find and article or a video over formative assessment. Once you settle on one you like develop a brief summary of the article or video (summary/what you liked/what it means to your teaching format) and post it, along with the link in discussion thread three.  

DISCUSSION: For each chapter read, and your research on formative assessment, you will need to post a response to the reading. The responses should be brief and explain at least post one idea or major point you got from each chapter. Responses to the chapters should be posted by Wednesday midnight each week. Two chapters read and the research piece means you will post three responses. Each discussion thread is worth 10 points.

By Friday midnight of each week you will need to comment on at least one additional person’s response to the reading.

ACTIVITIES

Activity 1: Ponder time – Select one of listed questions and respond by posting your answer by Friday midnight. By Sunday midnight, you should read the postings of your peers and respond to at least one. (You’ll be asked to do this each week.)

Activity 2: Analyzing Your Assessment – Assessment Project – This week you will complete the plan for your final assessment project. In the next three weeks you will complete the project one section at a time. You will use a couple of documents to complete your analysis of your assessment, and the plan for improvement. The planning guide you complete this week will also serve as an Introduction for your assessment and will be worth 25 point on the final assessment project. You should plan to revise it based on the input of your peers, as needed.

Post the plan for your assessment by Thursday midnightBy Sunday midnight, you should read the postings of your peers and respond to at least one.

Week 6: 

TOPICS

·        Making Sense Out of Standardized Test Scores

·        Appropriate and Inappropriate Test Preparation

CORE LEARNER OUTCOMES for Week 6:

·       Gain a working knowledge of basic standardized assessment terminology

·       Identify the various purposes of standardized assessment

·       Use descriptive and correlation statistics in the interpretation of assessment results

·       Interpret standardized tests, be able to communicate results to parents, and utilize results to inform instruction 

·       Identify appropriate and inappropriate test preparation practices

Week 6 Assignments:

READChapters 13 & 14 in Classroom Assessment. 

VIEW: View the Power Point presentation: Unit 6 – Ethical Test Preparation Practices

DISCUSSION: For each chapter read, you will need to post a response to the reading. The responses should be brief and explain at least one idea or major point you got from each chapter. Responses to the chapters should be posted by Wednesday midnight each week. Two chapters during week one means you will post two responses.

By Friday midnight of each week you will need to comment on at least one additional person’s response to the reading.

ACTIVITIES

Activity 1: Ponder time – Select one of questions and respond by posting your answer by Friday midnight. By Sunday midnight, you should read the postings of your peers and respond to at least one. (You’ll be asked to do this each week.

·       If you had to use only one of the three individual student interpretation schemes addressed in chapter 13, (percentiles, grade- equivalent scores, or scale scores) which one would it be” Explain why you made that choice.

·       In chapter 14, you read about the problem of improper test preparation practices. Based on what you read in the book, and what you know about test prep practices, do you think it is appropriate to have students practice the format/context used on the state test on their in class assessments? This refers to the types of questions, not the exact same questions that are found on the test. Explain why you believe the way you do. 

Activity 2: Assessment Final Project – Develop the selected response questions you are going to use on the assessment you are revising.   Make sure they are directly related to the learning outcomes you want to assess on the test.   Make sure you have enough items to determine mastery.

Week 7

TOPICS

·        The Evaluation of Instruction

·        Assessment Based Grading

CORE LEARNER OUTCOMES for Week 7:

·        Gain a working knowledge of basic assessment terminology

·        Develop assessment techniques to measure psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains and relate assessment to course objectives and instruction

·        Develop effective objective, subjective, and essay items and utilize item analysis to improve assessment measures

·        Implement fair qualitative and quantitative grading procedures including authentic assessments

·        Interpret assessments, be able to communicate results to parents, and utilize results to inform instruction 

Week 7 Assignments:

READ: Chapters 15 & 16 in Classroom Assessment. In addition, you need to read an article, by Douglas B Reeves, The Case Against the Zero, from the December 2004, Phi Delta Kappan.

VIEW: Power Point presentation: Unit 7 – Ethical Test Preparation Practices

DISCUSSION: This week’s discussion will be a little different. You will have three discussion threads.   Instead of just reporting important ideas you read in the chapters you read, you will need to read an additional article about grading, view a power point and then respond to the discussion threads,

Your response should explain why you favor or oppose goal-attainment grading. Your response to the chapters should be posted by Wednesday midnight each week. 

By Friday midnight of this week you will need to comment on at least one additional person’s stance on goal-attainment grading.

ACTIVITIES

Activity 1: Also from the document sharing area, download the “Understanding NCLB State Assessment Data Reports.” Review the results and make some inferences about them. Identify the strengths and weaknesses you see based on the data.   Respond by posting your answers by Friday midnight. By Sunday midnight, you should read the postings of your peers and respond to at least one. 

Activity 2: Creating Your Final Assessment Project –Constructed Response Items 

This week you will begin constructing the items in your final assessment project by developing the constructed response questions you will use. Each constructed response (open- ended or closed) should be directly related to at least one of the learning outcomes for the unit. You will also create scoring rubrics for the 5 open ended constructed response items. Complete directions are found in the activity section.

Respond by posting your constructed response items and the rubrics by Friday midnight. By Sunday midnight, you should read the postings of your peers and respond to at least one. 

Week 8

THINGS TO DO THIS WEEK:

·        Take your final exam.

·        Develop a performance event to include in your final assessment project. 

·        Post discussion threads and respond to as you have done each week. The performance event will need to be posted by Wednesday midnight this week. You will need to post your response to your peers by Thursday midnight.

·        Reflect on what you have learned in this class.

·        You have your final project to complete and post by Saturday night.

CORE LEARNER OUTCOMES for Week 8:

·        Gain a working knowledge of basic assessment terminology

·        Identify the various purposes of assessment

·        Develop appropriate, measurable goals, and objectives using the taxonomy of instructional objectives

·        Develop assessment techniques to measure psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains and relate assessment to course objectives and instruction

·        Use descriptive and correlation statistics in the interpretation of assessment results

·        Develop effective objective, subjective, and essay items and utilize item analysis to improve assessment measures

·        Implement fair qualitative and quantitative grading procedures including authentic assessments

·        Interpret standardized tests, be able to communicate results to parents, and utilize results to inform instruction 

 

Week 8 Assignments:

DISCUSSION: For week 8, there are two discussion threads. They will be worth 15 points each this week, because you will be looking back at the whole class and picking out some of the most important things you have learned.  

For the first thread you will need to postthe three most significant things you learned in this class. The responses should explain at least three ideas or major points you got from everything you read and discussed. 

  • Responses should describe each of the three the important ideas or major points you got from the class
  • Responses should explain what the ideas mean to you
  • Responses should explain the impact they could have on your teaching. 

Initial posts should be posted by Wednesday midnight this week. 

By Friday midnight this week you will need to comment on at least one additional person’s response.

For the second discussion thread, you will need to develop a brief posting discussing what you might do differently in your own classroom based on what you have learned in this class. Initial posts should be posted by Wednesday midnight this week. 

By Friday midnight this week you will need to comment on at least one additional person’s response.

ACTIVITIES

Activity 1: Your final piece of the assessment you are developing is a performance event. You will be developing that this week. You will need to work on it early in the week in order to post it by Wednesday midnight this week. That way you will have time to get feedback from your peers and then pull your whole assessment together in the form of a single “test.”

By Friday midnight this week you will need to comment on at least one additional person’s response to the reading.

Activity 2: This week you will complete your final assessment project – the test you have revised over the course of this class Post your completed classroom assessment project in the project area by Friday midnight. By Sunday midnight, you should review the postings of your classmates and respond to at least one. 

Academic Honesty:
As a learning community, the University upholds the highest standards of academic integrity in all its academic activities, by faculty, staff, administrators and students. Academic integrity involves much more than respecting intellectual property rights. It lies at the heart of learning, creativity, and the core values of the University. Those who learn, teach, write, publish, present, or exhibit creative works are advised to familiarize themselves with the requirements of academic integrity and make every effort to avoid possible offenses against it, knowingly or unknowingly. Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 20

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism involves the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct.  Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 20


Attendance Policy:

Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and report absences. Excused absences can be granted by the instructor, for medical reasons, school sponsored activities, and employment-related demands, including temporary duty. Students are responsible for any missed work. Absences for two successive weeks, without approved excuse, will be reported to the Director of the individual graduate program, or to the Executive Director for the Graduate School, for appropriate action. Students with such a record of absences, without an approved excuse, may be administratively withdrawn from the class and notified that an "F" will be recorded, unless the student initiates official withdrawal from the class(es).Park University 2010-2011 Graduate Catalog Page 24

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:
 

NATIONAL AND STATE STANDARDS ADDRESSED IN ED6O8


For Teacher Leadership M.Ed. students - National Board Standards Addressed in ED608 


·        Professional skills in using instructional strategies and methods of inquiry supported by wisdom of practice/research. (NBPTS 2, 5, 6, 7)


·        Decision making and planning skills based on knowledge of content areas, best practices, and curricular goals. (NBPTS 1, 2, 5, 8, 10)


·        Commitment to ethical practices and professional standards. (NBPTS 1, 4, 9)


·        Ability to develop and interpret multiple assessment strategies to help ensure the continuous development of the learner. (NBPTS 1, 2, 7, 8)


·        Ability to incorporate different approaches to learning. (NBPTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)


·        Ability to become inclusive educators who can provide service to a diverse community. (NBPTS 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 13)


·        Ability to diagnose education problems and devise prescriptive strategies. (NBPTS 1, 5, 8, 10)


·        Ability to collaborate with educators at different levels. (NBPTS 11, 12)


·        Technology skills for gathering, analyzing information, enhancing instructional practices increasing professional productivity and managing change. (NBPTS 13)


 


For Educational Leadership M. Ed. Students - ISLLC Standards Addressed in ED608


ISLLC Standard 2: An education leader promotes the success of every student by advocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth.


B. Create comprehensive, rigorous, coherent and research-based curricular and co-curricular programs;


C. Create personalized and motivating learning environments that meet the needs of all students;


E. Develop assessment and accountability systems to monitor student progress;


G. Maximize time spent on quality instruction;


I. Monitor and evaluate the impact of the instructional program on learning.


 


For MAT (Master of Arts in Teaching) Students - MoSTEP (Initial Certification)


1.2 Professional Competencies for Teacher Preparation (Initial)


Candidates for teacher certification have completed a program of content, professional, pedagogical, and integrative studies.


Quality Indicators:


1.2.3 The preservice teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.


1.2.4 The preservice teacher recognizes the importance of long-range planning and curriculum development and develops, implements, and evaluates curriculum based upon student, district, and state performance standards.


1.2.5 The preservice teacher uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students' development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.


1.2.8 The preservice teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the learner.


Performance Indicators: The preservice teacher


1.2.8.1 employs a variety of formal and informal assessment techniques (e.g., observation, portfolios of student work, teacher-made tests, performance tasks, projects, student self-assessments, authentic assessments, and standardized tests) to enhance and monitor his/her knowledge of learning, to evaluate student progress and performances, and to modify instructional approaches and learning strategies;


1.2.8.2   uses assessment strategies to involve learners in self-assessment activities, to help them become aware of their learning behaviors, strengths, needs and progress, and to encourage them to set personal goals for learning;


1.2.8.3 evaluates the effect of class activities on both individual and the class as a whole, collecting information through observation of classroom interactions, questioning, and analysis of student work;


1.2.8.4   maintains useful records of student work and performances and can communicate student progress knowledgeably and responsibly, based on appropriate indicators, to student, parents, and other colleagues.


1.2.9 The preservice teacher is a reflective practitioner of the profession continually assesses the effects of his/her choices and actions on others. This reflective practitioner actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally and utilizes the assessment and professional growth to generate more learning for more students.


 



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Content - Acquire the skills necessary to construct and/or modify a variety of classroom assessments                                                                                                                                                       
Outcomes
1,3,5,9                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

3. Exceeds expectations – clearly indicates proficiency in the graduate student's ability to develop a variety of test questions by a cumulative score of 90% or better on all teacher made tests
 
Meets expectations – indicates near proficiency in the graduate student's ability to develop a variety of test questions by a cumulative score of 80% to 89% on all teacher made tests Does not meet expectations – indicates below proficiency in the graduate student's ability to develop a variety of test questions by a cumulative score of 70% to 79% on all teacher made tests. Shows no evidence of meeting expectations – Cumulative score of less than 70% on all teacher made tests or No evidence submitted 
Analysis(1) - Categorize, in the form of a rubric, the components for the answer to the extended response test item that distinguishes factors for grading the answer                                                                                      
Outcomes
1,2,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Exceeds expectations – More than four separate factors presented Meets expectations – Three or four separate factors presented Does not meet expectations – Less than three separate factors presented Shows no evidence of meeting expectations – No evidence submitted 
Analysis(2) - Analyze, from a case study, the battery of educational assessment and communicate the assessment results to student, parents and other professionals                                                                                         
Outcomes
2,6,8                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Exceeds expectations – Teacher is able to explain statistical concepts of standardized tests with 100% accuracy Meets expectations – Teacher is able to explain statistical concepts of standardized tests with 90-99% accuracy Does not meet expectations – Teacher explains statistical concepts of standardized tests with less than 89% accuracy. Shows no evidence of meeting expectations – No evidence submitted 
Application(1) - Construction of Select-Response Tests (4 binary choice, 1 unusual binary choice, 2 multiple choice and 1 matching test)                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1,3,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Exceeds expectations – No test writing violations Meets expectations – Less than three test writing violations Does not meet expectations – More than four test writing violations. Shows no evidence of meeting expectations – No evidence submitted 
Application(2) - Construction of Constructed-Response Tests (2 short-answer, 1 restricted response essay item, 1 extended-response item) without any test writing                                                                                          
Outcomes
1,3,5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Exceeds expectations – No test writing violations Meets expectations – Less than three test writing violations Does not meet expectations – More than four test writing violations. Shows no evidence of meeting expectations – No evidence submitted 
Application(3) - Construction of a Likert Scale to evaluate classroom instruction for a diverse student population.                                                                                                                                        
Outcomes
9                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Exceeds expectations – No scale writing violations Meets expectations – less than three scale writing violations Does not meet expectations – More than four scale writing violations Shows no evidence of meeting expectations.  No evidence submitted 
Technical/Professional Skills - Using a Power Point presentation, the teacher will describe at least 1 assessment technique and provide examples of how it will be used to benefit students.                                                               
Outcomes
Technology skills 11                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Exceeds expectations- Fonts are easy to read, layout is aesthetically pleasing, Introduction draws audience in with compelling questions, content is clear with a logical progression of ideas and supporting information- elaboration and explanation Meets expectations- Sometimes fonts are easy to read but long paragraphs, color or busy background detracts from readability, Introduction is clear and coherent and relates to the topic, and Content is written with a logical progression of ideas and supporting information.  Fails to elaborate. Does not meet expectations- Readability is difficult too many different fonts, appears cluttered, Introduction shows some structure but does not create a strong sense of what is to follow, Content is vague in conveying a point of view and does not create a strong sense of purpose- cannot answer questions about subject. 0. Shows no evidence of meeting expectations

 
Professional writing skills - Reflections clearly explain professional responsibilities in relationship to educational assessment                                                                                                                          
Outcomes
10                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
. Exceeds expectations- demonstrates full knowledge with explanations and elaboration of professional responsibilities in regard to Procedural Safeguards in assessment for IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), practice of absence of bias in development of test items, standardized procedures in administration of standardized tests, confidentiality of information.
Content is written clearly and concisely with logical progression of ideas and supporting information, text is written with no errors in writing mechanics.
 
. Meets expectations- demonstrates full knowledge of professional responsibilities in regard to Procedural Safeguards in assessment for IDEA, practice of absence of bias in development of test items, standardized procedures in administration of standardized tests, confidentiality of information.  Content is written with logical progression of ideas, text is written with little editing required for writing mechanics. Does not meet expectations- Demonstrates limited knowledge of professional responsibilities in regard to Procedural Safeguards in assessment for IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), practice of absence of bias in development of test items, standardized procedures in administration of standardized tests, confidentiality of information. Content is vague in conveying information. Spelling, punctuation and grammar errors distract or impair readability. Shows no evidence of meeting expectations. 

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Last Updated:5/26/2011 12:41:48 PM