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SO 141 Introduction to Sociology
Miller, Tamara D.


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

SO 141 Introduction to Sociology

Semester

F2J 2011 PV

Faculty

Miller, Tamara D.

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

AA Longview Community College
BA University of Missouri Kansas City
MA Central Missouri State University

Office Location

Parkville

Office Hours

before class, by appointment

Daytime Phone

913 288 7136

E-Mail

Tamara.Miller@park.edu

tammil818@hotmail.com

Semester Dates

October 17 - December 5

Class Days

Wednesdays

Class Time

5:30 - 9:50 PM

Prerequisites

none

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:


SOC 2010 Edition, 1st Edition
Jon  Witt, CENTRAL COLLEGE
Softcover,  432 pages
©2009, ISBN-13 9780077290658

MHID 0077290658

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
An examination of the social processes and structures of society, with particular attention to American society.  Reviews such topics as interpersonal interaction, culture, major social institutions, inequality, deviance, and social change.  Also introduces methods used in sociological research.  3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
The facilitator encourages critical thinking, reading and writing skills. I believe that learning is fundamentally about exploring the boundaries of your values, beliefs and ideas. I will address a variety of learning styles through the use of visual media, discussions and group activities, presentations and hands on application of concepts.I expect that you encounter things with which you will not agree.That is absolutely your right and I will respect that right. It is my hope that you discover alternative views, whether or not you adopt them as your own.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Recognize the major schools of sociological theory, locate their conceptual relation to one another, apply them to real world examples, and evaluate their relative strengths and weaknesses.
  2. Identify important research methodologies used in the field, explain their application, and assess their benefits and drawbacks.
  3. Know the prominent social institutions and forms of organization, identify their common functions and dysfunctions, and compare and contrast real world examples.
  4. Define, explain, and illustrate the various resources (i.e., economic, social, and cultural capitals), their patterns of unequal distribution, their influences and consequences for individuals, collectivities, and societies; and critically evaluate how they relate to issues of power, social control, and the perpetuation of inequality.
  5. Understand and evaluate the ways societies and cultures influence, and are in turn are influenced by, individuals; explain how some personal problems and opportunities may be better characterized as symptomatic of societies and cultures; and analyze personal identity also as a group or sociocultural phenomenon.
  6. Identify and analyze the causes, conditions, mechanisms, and consequences for deviance and social change; and evaluate how they fit into specific times and places and understand the reasons for, and opposition to, deviance and change.
  7. Demonstrate ability to critically assess your own and others' experiences and perspectives from multiple perspectives; and understand how values and group memberships shape your sense of truth and of social priorities and policies.


Core Assessment:

Core Assessment (New for July, 2006) 


This term paper is worth 200 points and should take 10 to 15 pages (about 2500 to 3250 words) to adequately complete. Preliminary grading will be done by computer, but the final grade will be assigned by the instructor.

One of the goals for this course is to help you see your own lives and your places in the world differently.  For this term paper you are to use concepts and topics from different chapters to describe and interpret important parts of your own lives. Each time you submit a draft to SAGrader you should include all the earlier pieces along with the latest section. The program’s grading will be cumulative. After the program grades each assignment, you will have the opportunity to challenge the score, and we will review the program’s results.  But you must leave adequate time for human review of a challenge (at least 48 hours).  If you do not allow this window between drafts, then the challenge will not be considered.


Part I: Inequality How has inequality affected your own life? What is your own social class, gender, race and ethnicity?


Social Class. Several kinds of stratification are discussed in the chapter on stratification. Among those are Marx’s theory of class conflict based on two social classes, Wright’s typology of social classes including four classes, and the discussion of the American class structure based on six different classes. Briefly summarize each of these perspectives and distinguish the classes they contain. Which do you think best reflects important elements of today’s society? Where do you expect to be located in each of those classifications after you finish college and begin your career? There are many different kinds of social mobility. What kinds of social mobility do you expect to experience in your own lifetime? Give examples of your own social statuses and those of your parents to illustrate those kinds of social mobility. Be sure to mention at least four kinds of social mobility and to indicate which you believe you will experience.


Gender. What is your gender? What is the difference between gender, sex, and sexuality? How has gender helped or hurt you in your life so far? How do you expect it to help or hurt you in the future? What are some of the issues and concepts related to gender you expect will be important in your life? How are issues such as glass ceilings, second shift, pink-collar jobs, and patriarchy likely to affect you? Be sure to define each concept.


Race & Ethnicity. What is your own race and ethnicity? What is the difference between race and ethnicity? What are some of the differences between your own racial or ethnic group and at least two other common racial and ethnic groups in the United States today?


Part II: Work and Economy In this part of the paper you are to discuss some of the ways the economy and work are changing in today’s world, and how those changes have affected your parents and are likely to affect you in your own lifetime.


First, what kind of work do your parents do (you can substitute a single parent or guardian or someone in that generation if you prefer)? What sector of the economy would their job be in? How does that sector differ from the other sectors in modern economies? Would you say they are in the primary or the secondary labor market? What is the difference between the two, and which has the better jobs? How has their work been affected by rationalization? globalization? industrialization? Be sure to clearly define each of those as well as saying how it relates to their work. Include the important processes associated with the rationalization, including bureaucratization, mechanization, and scientific management.


Second, how do you think these same concepts and issues will affect the work you do in your own life? What kind of job do you hope to have for your career? In what sector of the economy? In what labor market? What are future changes you can expect to occur in work during the next decade or so? Cite arguments and examples from books or articles and Internet sources to justify your expectations.


Part III: Marriage and Family.


Marriage. The chapter discusses several factors that influence who you are likely to marry. If you are not already married, how do you think these factors will influence your own choice of marriage partner? If you are already married, then how did they influence your decision? If all of these factors influenced you, then what kind of person would you be most likely to marry? Be sure to mention some of the issues like the marriage squeeze, the marriage gradient endogamy, and exogamy. How do these various factors, and their relationship to marriage partner choices support or challenge our notion of romantic love? Feel free to reframe this question in terms of civil unions or gay marriage if you so desire.


Family. What are some of the ways families have changed during the last 100 years? Discuss some of the most important changes and indicate how well they are reflected in your own family. For example, you might compare your family of orientation to that of your parents or grandparents. How do they differ in size, in whether they are nuclear or extended family households, in the occurrence of divorce, in cohabitation rates, in whether the wife works outside the home (labor market participation), how childcare is handled, how household tasks are shared among husband and wife, common functions of the family, and so on? Be sure to use and define appropriate concepts and perspectives such as the concept of the “second shift.”


Remember that this paper will also be graded for how well it is written. You are expected to have a title that conveys the key features of your paper, an introductory paragraph, and a concluding paragraph. Your paper will be graded on how well it is organized. For example, an essay that devotes a paragraph to each major topic for families will get a better grade than one that jumps around from topic to topic in each paragraph and spreads coverage of a topic across paragraphs. Part III should also have a conclusion in which you give you an overview of how sociology helps you understand your own life. (Alternatively, you can argue that it does not help, but you’d better make a good case for it. After all, this IS a sociology course!) The final draft should include at least 5 library references to books or academic articles, and at least 5 web pages from the Internet.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
Your grade is based on exams, presentations, journal article reviews, the core assessment assignment, and other written assignments. There are three one hundred point exams, multiple choice, short answer and essay. None is weighted any differently than any other and the final is non-comprehensive except to the extent that the knowledge builds. The "projects" are three 25 point written assignments. One is a church visit OR cultural event. Should you opt for a church visit, it must be  outside your religious tradition, so, if you were raised in a Christian church, you must attend a Jewish temple for example. In that paper you are asked to visit a church, OUTSIDE your faith tradition and tell me of your experience. This is an excellent opportunity to experience being "different". We are so fortunate in Kansas City. We have Buddhist temples, Islamic mosques, Jewish Synagogues and a variety of other forms of religious expression. You may not visit a Baptist church if you are Methodist and have that count. Really explore. This is a difficult assignment for many people, but I consistently have students tell me that it is one of the best, once they bring themselves to do it. If you opt for a cultural event, it must be an event where you can observe cultural traditions that are NOT your own culture. An ethnic festival is an example of a cultural event. A lecture by someone from another culture, where the topic is cultural difference might be another example. The second is is an article review from a scholarly journal. Scholarly journals are peer edited and reviewed and most often published by professional organizations. An example might be The Journal of the American Sociological Association. Examples of things that are NOT scholarly would be Glamour and Cosmo. If you have questions, come to me and I will point you in the right direction. The third is a norm violation. You will violate a norm and then report out to the class...how did you feel, how did others respond, why do you suppose it is a norm to begin with, how is it functional?

Grading:

Three exams 100 points each, multiple choice, short answer, essay, three projects 25 points each, an article review and a summary of a church visit or cultural event. One core assessment assignment 200 points (this assignment is described above) , 25 points each week for attendance.
775 - 697 A
696 - 620 B
619 - 542 C
541 - 465  D
464 and below F

Late Submission of Course Materials:
I understand that difficulties emerge as our lives progress. I will make every effort to accommodate you IF you make arrangements in advance. Do not come to me the night something is due and attempt to make an arrangement for a later due date. If you have not made arrangements in advance, I do not accept late materials. I do not accept anything handwritten. You must submit your assignments at 5:30 on the date due.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
I expect respectful behavior. This class lends itself to heated and personal discussions. I have the expectation that what is said in our classroom stays in our classroom. I further expect that we speak one at a time, in a polite tone. Under no circumstances do we raise our voice or attack a person, only ideas are up for debate here. You might encounter things with which you do not agree. I respect your right to disagree and ask that you respect the rights of others to disagree. This class may discuss sexually explicit material. You are expected to deal with that in a mature and sensitive manner. I expect preparedness. That means that you come to each class ready to participate in a fully informed manner. I expect that you turn your cell off or to vibrate. If you must take a call, leave the room to do so. Generally, we will break at 7:00 if that will help you plan your evening.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

date topic due
October 19 Icebreaker and introductions, syllabus review, core assessment discussion, language of sociology, what is sociology, culture

chapters 1 -2

Please submit your "student information" sheets that are linked at the bottom of the syllabus

October 26

major theories, socialization and social structures

social groups and interactions

journal article

chapter 3 -5

November 2 deviance and social control exam one ch 1-5
November 9 families, education, religion and government

 ch 6 and 7

norm violation

November 16  economy and social class

church visit

ch 8, 9 and 10

November 23 global inequalities, gender and age
exam two ch 6-10
November 30 race and ethnicity, health/science and social change

core assessment project

ch 11- 15

December 7 Service project at ReStart Final exam due, ch 11 - 15

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93
If I learn of your cheating I will give you a zero, report you to the campus administrator and request that you withdraw from the class.

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93
When students plagiarize, it is usually because they don't know how not to...if you are in doubt or have questions, ASK. It is far better to ask questions that to suffer the penalty associated with academic dishonesty. I am happy to help.

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 96
ANY two absences will result in an administrative withdrawal and/or an "F" in the course.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .


Attachments:
Student Information

Rapist Typology

Clarence Darrow's Address to Prisoners

Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
1, 2, 7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
•  Critically, creatively and thoroughly evaluates at least 2 well-selected course materials, and their application and conclusions, as used in the assignment.  Identifies and successfully defends at least 2 strengths and 2 weaknesses.  Goes beyond assignment expectations in the quantity or quality of critical evaluation.




•  Attempts to justify all major arguments through the integrated application of comprehensive and detailed critical reasoning and scientific evidence.




•  Reflexively and creatively evaluates at least 2 strengths and 2 weakness of their own and of at least 2 others' assumptions, arguments, analyses, conclusions, and applications.




 
•  Critically evaluates selected materials appropriate to an introductory course, and outside academic sources appropriate to the assignment.  Identifies at least 1 strength and 1 weakness of most key concepts or positions used in the essay.




•  Attempts to justify most arguments through the integrated application of appropriate and sufficiently detailed critical reasoning and scientific evidence.




•  Reflexively identifies at least 1 strength and 1 weakness of their own position and of at least 1 others' assumptions, arguments, analyses, conclusions, or applications.




 
•  Demonstrates little critical evaluation (perhaps 1 or 2 incomplete attempts overall).  Fails to offer a balanced evaluation of important concepts or positions.




•  Asserts opinions, but fails to justify important arguments in an appropriate manner.




•  Presents biased arguments against those positions with which they disagree or for those that support their pre-existing biases.









 
•  Demonstrates no critical evaluation.  Arguments are unbalanced and demonstrably biased.




•  Fails to offer any appropriate justification for arguments.  Uses little no appreciable critical reasoning or scientific evidence.




•  May seek to confirm pre-existing opinions without subjecting them to critical testing.




 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
•  Displays particular judgment in selecting and integrating at least 5 outside academic sources.




•  Integrates, compares and contrasts differing sources and perspectives with no major errors and no more that 2 minor errors.




•  Incorporates at least 1 or 2 sources from popular or mainstream media as particularly apt illustrations of course content.




•  Draws at least 3 accurate and defensible connections among the concepts and sources used.




 
•  Correctly integrates at least 4 outside academic sources appropriate to the assignment.




•  Integrates, compares and contrasts differing sources and perspectives with no major errors and no more than a few minor errors.




•  May also incorporate sources from popular or mainstream media, but correctly distinguishes between scientific and non-scientific outside sources, as appropriate, and uses the latter only for illustration and not justification.




•  Draws at least 2 connections among concepts and sources with no major errors.




 
•  Attempts to integrate 2 to 3 outside academic sources, but does so with at least 1 major error or with several minor errors.




•  Includes only sources on one side of an issue where there is legitimate and obvious disciplinary disagreement.




•  Evidences little discernment between academic and popular sources.




•  Draws no more than 1 or 2 connections among concepts and sources.  May contain a serious error or several minor errors.




 
•  No attempt to integrate outside academic sources.  Contains more than 1 major error or many minor errors.  No significant attempt at synthesis.




•  Evidences no discernment between academic and popular sources.




•  Draws no significant connections among concepts and sources.




 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
•  Demonstrates exceptional command of at least 5 concepts and theoretical perspectives presented in the course.  Introduces at least 1 additional relevant finding or theoretical and conceptual distinction.




•  Successfully analyzes at least 5 appropriate selected course materials, and integrates at least 2 outside sources into their analysis, without major error.




 
•  Demonstrates sufficient command of at least 4 appropriate concepts and theoretical perspectives presented in the course.




•  Successfully analyzes at least 4 appropriate selected course materials, and perhaps some limited outside sources, without major error.




 
•  Demonstrates insufficient command of appropriate concepts and theoretical perspectives with at least 2 major errors or a few minor ones.




•  Analysis of appropriate selected course materials contains 1 or 2 major errors or several minor ones.




•  Uses inappropriate reason, evidence or justification.




 
•  Fails to demonstrate any sufficient command of appropriate concepts and theoretical perspectives.




•  Analysis of inappropriate course materials or contains at least 3 major errors or many minor ones.  No attempt at analysis of outside materials or examples.




 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
3, 4, 5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
•  Demonstrates and justifies command of factual course materials.  Employs at least 3 salient outside examples.




•  Applies course materials to at least 3 relevant personal, social, and historical examples without error.




• Illustrates and supports most points through examples, details, and supporting information.




 
•  Demonstrates and justifies sufficient command of factual materials presented in the course, and 2 or 3 outside sources.




•  Applies course materials to at least 2 appropriate personal, social, or historical examples without major error.









 
•  Demonstrates insufficient command of factual course materials.




•  Inappropriate or insufficient personal, social, or historical examples (no more than 2 to 3 attempts).




•  Provides inadequate illustration and support of 1 to 3 key points or several minor ones.




 
•  Fails to demonstrate meaningful command of factual course materials.




•  Lacks meaningful, relevant, or significant personal, social, or historical examples, or they are completely inappropriate to the assignment.




•  Provides little, if any, support for even key points.




 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
3, 4, 5, 6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
•  Responds fully and completely to the assignment using appropriate, direct language.  Includes all major assignment objectives.




•  Uses precise, accurate and expressive language.




•  Well organized, unified, focused, flowing, or has a particularly well-suited opening and closing.




•  Presents a balanced treatment of controversial research or policy issues.




•  Correctly utilizes technical terminology from the course and outside research in a precise manner exceeding the level of an introductory course.




 
•  Responds completely to the assignment using appropriate language.  Includes all major assignment objectives.




•  Organized, unified, and focused.




•  Presents 1 side of controversial research or policy issues well and completely, and makes a serious (though perhaps not completely successful) effort to communicate at least 1 alternative.




•  Correctly utilizes technical language from the course and outside research in a manner appropriate to the assignment and level of an introductory course.




•  Has no major, or only a few minor, terminological errors.




 
•  Fails to respond fully or completely to the assignment.  Misses 1 or more major assignment objectives.  Language is sometimes inappropriate or confusing.




•  Lacks some organization or is slightly unfocused.




•  Evidences bias or makes little effort to communicate serious alternatives.




•  Has 1 or more major, or more than a few minor, terminological errors.




 
•  Language is often inappropriate or confusing, and does not express a clear purpose.




•  Is disorganized, disjointed, unfocused, or stilted.  Unsuccessful or lacking in its opening and closing.




•  Evidences serious bias.




• Has at least 2 major, or many minor, terminological errors.




 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
1, 2, 7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
•  Has no errors in spelling, grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, structure and format.




• Evidences literacy, numeracy, rhetorical, and information processing skills beyond the level of an introductory course.




•  Completely and correctly acknowledges and documents (through in text citations and an accompanying references section) all directly and indirectly used sources.




•  No errors in the application of relevant portions of APA format.




 
•  Has no major errors, and no more than a few minor errors, in spelling, grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, structure and format.




•  Evidences basic literacy, numeracy, rhetorical, and information processing skills appropriate to the level of an introductory course.




•  Consistently, but not completely acknowledges and documents (through in text citations and an accompanying references section) all directly used sources.  May evidence minor problems with indirect attribution or a few small errors in reference format.




•  1or more minor errors in the application of relevant portions of APA format.




 
• Has 1 or 2 major, or more than a few minor, errors in spelling, grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, structure and format.




•  Incompletely or inconsistently displays literacy, numeracy, rhetorical, and information processing skills at the level of an introductory course.




•  Incompletely or inconsistently acknowledges and documents (through in text citations and an accompanying references section) all directly used sources (1 or more errors).  May evidence 1 or 2 major problems, or a few minor problems, with indirect attribution or several errors in reference format.




•  1 or 2 major errors, or a few minor errors, in the application of relevant portions of APA format.




 
• Has 3 or more major, or many minor, errors in spelling, grammar, punctuation, vocabulary, structure and format.




• Has 3 or more major errors, or many minor errors, in literacy, numeracy, rhetorical, or information processing skills, or fails to demonstrate most of these at the level of an introductory course.




• Has 2 or more major errors, or many minor errors, in acknowledging and documenting citations and references.  May evidence 2 or more major problems with indirect attribution or may misattribute sources.  Reference and citation format is inconsistent or incorrect.




•  More than 2 major errors, or several minor errors, in the application of relevant portions of APA format.




 
CIVIC                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
Outcomes
3, 4, 5, 6, 7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Provides more that 2 insightful examples of how personal problems or opportunities link to social issues and structures.  Includes a technically advanced analysis of those connections and their consequences for an introductory course.  Critically evaluates the consequences of those connections for more than 1 social group or category. Provides at least 2 appropriate examples of how personal problems or opportunities link to social issues and structures.  Includes an analysis of those connections and their consequences.  Critically evaluates the consequences of those connections for at least one social group or category. Provides inadequate or incomplete examples of how personal problems or opportunities link to social issues and structures.  Includes little or no significant analysis of those connections and their consequences.  Inadequate or biased attempt at critical evaluation of the consequences of those connections for at least one social group or category. Provides no tenable examples of how personal problems or opportunities link to social issues and structures.  Includes no significant analysis of those connections and their consequences.  Nonexistent or markedly biased attempt at critical evaluation of the consequences of those connections for at least one social group or category. 
VALUES                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
Outcomes
1, 2, 7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Clearly and completely provides more than 2 significant examples of how their class, race, ethnicity, gender, and other factors shapes their opinions and ethical stances on public issues and private decisions.  Thoroughly analyzes, evaluates, and contextualizes their positions. Explains and provides 2 or more examples of how their class, race, ethnicity, gender, and other factors shape their opinions and ethical stances on public issues and private decisions. Provides a 1 or 2 examples of how their class, race, ethnicity, gender, and other factors shapes their opinions and ethical stances on public issues and private decisions, but offers incomplete or inadequate analyses, critiques, or contextualizations. Fails to offer any meaningful examples of how class, race, ethnicity, gender, or other factors shapes their opinions and ethical stances on public issues and private decisions. 

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Last Updated:9/6/2011 3:58:54 PM