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CJ 200 Criminology
Hamilton, John R.,, Jr.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

CJ 200 Criminology

Semester

FA 2011 HO

Faculty

Hamilton, John R.,, Jr.

Title

Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Administration

Degrees/Certificates

Ph.D.

Office Location

Mackay 20

Office Hours

Monday: 8:30-9:30 a.m. and 12:30-1:30 p.m.; Tuesday: 12:30-2:00 p.m.; Wednesday: 8:30-9:30 a.m. and 12:30-1:30 p.m.; Thursday:12:30-2:00 p.m.; Friday: 8:30-9:30 a.m., and by appointment

Daytime Phone

(816) 584-6302

E-Mail

john.hamilton@park.edu

Semester Dates

August 15-December 10, 2011

Class Days

-M-W-F-

Class Time

10:00 - 10:50 AM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 

Schmalleger, Frank. (2011). Criminology: A Brief Introduction. Boston:Prentice Hall Publications.  ISBN: 0132340690 

 

Information from the Park University Bookstore: Your textbook new is $96.00 and used $72.00. The rental price is $47.05.

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
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Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
CJ200 Criminology: This basic course provides an examination of the nature and extent of crime and theories of crime causation, as well as the societal reaction to criminal behavior will be covered in this class. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
 

The instructor’s educational philosophy is one of interactiveness based on lectures, readings, quizzes, dialogues, examinations, and writings.  The instructor will engage each learner in the process of critical thinking whereby all information is critically examined to allow the learner to conduct a logical analysis in arriving at conclusions about the validity and value of the information.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify and analyze the causes and theories of crime and criminal activities.
  2. Recognize the historical foundations of the study of criminal behavior.
  3. Examine ways in which society today deals with criminal behavior and its efforts at preventing and punishing criminal behavior.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop the ability to analyze information from multiple sources
  2. Examine various perspectives and develop cogent conclusions
Core Assessment:

For CJ200, all students will complete an essay, 6-8 pages (1,500 to 2,000 words) in length (excluding the cover sheet and bibliography pages) which compares and contrasts two of the theories of crime and criminal activity discussed in the course. You are free to select the theories you wish to examine. It is also acceptable to compare or contrast theories from different disciplines. In other words, you may choose to compare one of the sociological theories with a similar perspective in the psychological theories. Your essay should consider the historical foundations of the study of criminal behavior; and examine ways in which society responds to criminal behavior in terms of prevention and punishment. The paper should be written in APA format and have at least four sources, three of which should be sources not covered in the course. The essay should contain a title page, an outline, and a bibliography.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
 

Assessment of learning will be through tests, quizzes, exercises, and papers.          

Grading:
 

Three tests                                         300 points                              33%

Comprehensive final                         100     “                                   11%   

Essay                                                 200     “                                   22%

Short papers (50 pts. Each)            150     “                                   17%

Class participation                            100     “                                   11%

Essay discussion                              _50                                          6%

                        TOTAL                         900    

In computing grades, the following scale will be used; however, the instructor reserves the right to make adjustments: A=90-100%, B=80-89%, C=70-79%, D=60-69%, F=less than 60%. In determining grades on papers, major factors to be considered include whether or not the assignment was completed correctly and in a timely manner. Ten points will be deducted for papers submitted late, and up to five points will be added for papers submitted prior to the due date.

 

 

WRITTEN EXERCISES

 

SHORT PAPERS:  The short papers should be 2-3 pages in length and computer generated. These are NOT major research papers but rather essays answering topics covered in the course. As with any writing, however, where the word or ideas of others are used, appropriate citation of the source is required. The topics are as follows:

Short Paper 1: The recent statistics released by the Department of Justice indicate that crime is declining.  In this short paper you will look at the concern that the public still seems to have about crime. Why do you think that crime continues to be a concern among the public despite declining crime rates? Is it right for the public to be concerned? What do you think seems to fuel the concern of the public about crime?

Short Paper 2: How valid do you believe the neoclassical theories of crime are? Where do you see evidence that these theories are still very prevalent in CJ?

Short Paper 3: There are two themes that tend to summarize the explanations for crime that we have been studying. The first is the Social Problems perspective. This perspective argues that the environment and other factors external to a person determine whether or not that person chooses to commit criminal behavior. The Social Responsibility perspective argues that a person knows the difference between right and wrong and the decision to commit criminal acts is a conscious decision made by the individual. Provide at least two theoretical perspectives that best support the social problems approach and at least two which best support the social responsibility approach. Which theme do you believe is currently popular? Why?

ESSAY:          The essay should compare and contrast at least two of the theories discussed in Chapters 2-7 of the textbook and be 6-8 pages in length. You are free to select the theories you wish to examine. It is also acceptable to compare or contrast theories from different disciplines. In other words, you may choose to compare one of the sociological theories with a similar perspective in the psychological theories. The paper will be discussed more during the first two weeks of class. 

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Assignments should be turned in on or before the due on which they are due. Certain work may be made up in cases of legitimate absence. The instructor must be notified (phone or e-mail) prior to the absence for the absence to be considered excused. Five points will be deducted for papers submitted late and up to five points will be added to papers submitted prior to the due date. Missed examinations must be made up prior to the next scheduled class period, unless arrangements are made with the instructor

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
 

It is expected that members of the class will treat each other with respect and dignity. There will be many different views and opinions and no one should be chastised or ridiculed for their contribution to the class. Students should refrain from texting or using Facebook during the class because it is disruptive to other students and the instructor.  Students should come to class properly prepared to discuss the scheduled lesson. 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
    

The instructor may amend this schedule based on the progress of the course and the needs of the students.

 

August 15                   Introduction to course

August 17                   Chapter 1       What is Criminology? Understanding                                                                     Crime and Criminals

August 19                   Chapter 1

August 22                   Chapter 1

August 24                   Chapter 2       Classical and Neoclassical                                                                                     Criminology: Choice and                                                                                         Consequences

August 26                   Chapter 2

August 29                   Chapter 2       Short paper #1 due

August 31                   Chapter 3       Biological Roots of Criminal                                                                                    Behavior: It’s What We Are

September 2             Chapter 3

September 5            Labor Day – No class

September 7             Chapter 3

September 9            Test  #1                    

September 12           Chapter 4       Psychological and Psychiatric                                                                                 Foundations of Criminal Behavior: It’s                                                                    How we Think  and

                                                            Short Paper #2 due           

 

September 14           Chapter 4      

September 16           Chapter 4

September 19           Chapter 5       Social Structure: It’s How We Live

September 21           Chapter 5

September 23           Chapter 5

September 26           Chapter 6       Social Process and Social                                                                                      Development: It’s What We Learn 

September 28           Chapter 6

September 30           Chapter 6

October 3                   Chapter 7       Social Conflict: It’s How We Relate

October 5                   Chapter 7

October 7                  Test #2

October 10               Fall Break – No class

October 12               Fall Break – No class

October 14               Fall Break – No class

October 17                 Chapter 8       Crimes Against Persons: What We                                                                    Fear   

October 19                 Chapter 8      

October 21                 Chapter 8

October 24                 Chapter 9       Crimes Against Property:  It’s What                                                                        We Lose and Short paper #3 due

October 26                 Chapter 9

October 28                 Chapter 9

October 31                 Chapter 10     White Collar and Organized: Crime as                                                                                                                     a Job 

November 2               Chapter 10

November 4               Chapter 10

November 7             Test #3

November 9               Discussion and case study

November 11            Veteran’s Day – No class

November 14          Chapter 11     Public Order and Drug Crimes:                                                                                                                                Recreational Offenses

November 16            Chapter 11

November 18            Chapter 11

November 21           Chapter 12     Technology and Crime: It’s a Double-                                                                                                                     Edged Sword

November 23            Chapter 12

November 25             Thanksgiving Break – No class

November 28            Chapter 13     Globalization and Terrorism: Our                                                                                                                              Small World  

November 30             Chapter 13

December 2              Final Discussions

 

Final Exam:  12/5/2011  10:15-12:15

 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 96

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The artifact assembles at least 4 sources from class readings, observations, and other resources The artifact assembles at least 2-3 sources from class readings, observations, and other resources The artifact assembles 2 or fewer sources from only one resource The artifact does not utilize proper resources 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1,3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
The artifact will display the use of at least 4 outside sources and the ability to properly compare and contrast the two perspectives. The artifact will display the use of at least 2-3 outside sources and the ability to compare and contrast the two perspectives. The artifact will display the use of fewer than 2 outside sources and show little ability to compare and contrast the two perspectives. The artifact does not display an ability to compare and contrast the two perspectives 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
1, 2, 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
The artifact demonstrates the student's ability to utilize 3 or more evaluation perspectives in support of the perspective they cite as most valid The artifact demonstrates the student's ability to utilize 2 evaluation perspectives in support of the perspective they cite as most valid The artifact contains 1 evaluation perspective in support of the perspective they cite as most valid Evaluation is not present in the artifact 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The artifact contains no errors in terminology The artifact contains 1-2 errors in terminology The artifact contains 3-4 errors in terminology The artifact contains 5 or more errors in terminology 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 2, 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
The artifact discusses more than 5 key elements and displays an exceptional understanding of the elements chosen The artifact discusses 4 key elements and displays an understanding of the elements chosen The artifact discusses fewer than 4 key elements and displays little understanding of the elements chosen The artifact does not discuss key elements 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1,3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
The artifact shows multiple instances and exceptional understanding of terminology and concepts throughout the paper The artifact shows sufficient and satisfactory use of terminology and concepts throughout the paper The artifact shows little and unsatisfactory use of terminology and concepts throughout the paper The artifact fails to demonstrate an understanding of terminology and concepts 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
1, 2, 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
The artifact is in APA format, is at least 8 pages in length, and displays proper grammar and no spelling errors The artifact is in APA format, is at least 5-7 pages in length, displays proper grammar and no more than 2 spelling errors The artifact is not in a proper format, contains multiple grammar errors, and 2 or more spelling errors The artifact is not in a proper format, contains multiple grammar errors, and multiple spelling errors 

Copyright:

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Last Updated:7/5/2011 5:47:31 PM