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EDC 220 Child Growth & Devel for ECE &Elementary Teachers
Herrera, Michele L.


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

EDC 220 Child Growth & Devel for ECE &Elementary Teachers

Semester

F1T 2011 DL

Faculty

Herrera, Michele L.

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

M.Ed. Early Childhood Education
Ed.D. Early Childhood Education

Office Location

Virtual

Office Hours

9-5 EST

Daytime Phone

843-290-1456

E-Mail

Michele.Herrera@park.edu

Semester Dates

8/15/11 - 10/9/11

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Trawick-Smith, Jeffrey (2010). Early Childhood Development: A Multicultural Perspective, 5/E Upper Saddle River, New Jersey. Merrill (ISBN 10-0135016460

Copple, C & Bredekamp, S, eds (2009) Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Early Childhood Programs Serving children from birth through Age 8. Washington D.C. NAEYC (ISBN- 978-1-9288896-64-7). Note: selected chapters and selected readings from CD.  this book will also be used in other Early Childhood coursework.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:
WEB RESOURCES

Professional Organizations

 American Psychological Association
http://www.apa.org
Provides information on the largest professional organization of psychologists in the country. Includes studies and news items focusing on children's behavior, learning, and physical growth and presents information on conferences, publications, and membership.

Association for Childhood Education International
http://www.acei.org
Provides information about one of the leading organizations for professionals in early childhood care and education. Includes materials related to children from birth through the elementary years and presents information on conferences, publications, and membership.

Council for Exceptional Children
http://www.cec.sped.org
Provides information on the largest international professional organization dedicated to improving the education of individuals with special needs. Click on the "Divisions" link for information on the Division for Early Childhood (DEC), devoted to supporting young children with special needs and their families. Included on the DEC Website are reports, position statements, and information on conferences and membership.

National Association for the Education of Young Children
http://www.naeyc.org
Presents information on the largest organization for professionals working with young children and their families. Provides lists of resources, publications, position statements, and information on conferences and memberships.

Advocacy Groups and Information Centers

 Child Trends
http://www.childtrends.org
Provides an overview of this advocacy group that is devoted to protecting children. Includes articles and research findings on child welfare topics, such as child abuse and neglect and child poverty.

Child Welfare League of America
http://www.cwla.org
Presents articles, research studies, and general information on the oldest child advocacy organization in the United States. Includes descriptions of advocacy activities of the CWL, which is devoted to promoting policies that protect children and strengthen families.

Children Now
http://www.childrennow.org
Presents information on an organization that advocates for the well-being of children and families. Includes articles, data summaries, and research on such topics as the media, violence in children's lives, children's health issues, and child care.

Children's Defense Fund
http://www.childrensdefense.org
Provides information on one of the leading child advocacy groups in the country. Contains goals and position statements and information on key issues and problems facing children and families in the United States.

Education Commission of the States
http://www.ecs.org
Presents information on an organization devoted to disseminating research and theory that can guide educational practice. Includes articles and research findings on educational issues, including those affecting young children and their families.

Families USA
http://www.familiesUSA.org
Includes information on an organization that advocates for child and family health. Provides articles, summaries of pending legislation, position statements, and other resources related to health issues.

Kids Count
http://www.aecf.org/kidscount
Presents information on a national organization that tracks the status of children in the United States and shares this information with policymakers, educators, and families. Includes surveys and data summaries that profile the well-being of children both nationally and state-by-state.

National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities
http://www.nichcy.org
Includes information on this national organization and referral center that provides resources on disabilities for families, educators, and other professionals. Includes a library of articles and research reports and an information search engine.

National Safe Kids Campaign
http://www.safekids.org
Provides information on an organization devoted exclusively to protecting children from their number one killer: unintentional accidents. Includes research reports, safety tips, and statistics on childhood accidents.

Stand for Children
http://www.stand.org
Provides information on this grassroots action group that takes action on issues related to children's health and education. Includes policy statements on national issues, including early childhood education and health care.

United Nations Children's Fund
http://www.unicef.org
Presents information on UNICEF, a United Nations organization devoted to helping children living in poverty in developing countries. Includes press releases, articles, and overviews of its initiatives related to early care and education, gender equity, child health and mortality, and childhood survival during war and natural disasters.

Government AgenciesEnvironmental Protection Agency: Office of Children's Health Protection
http://yosemite.epa.gov/ochp/ochpweb.nsf/homepage
Presents information and an overview of initiatives of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency related to children's health. Includes articles and research summaries related to such topics as asthma and respiratory ailments, neurological impairments, and the environmental factors that contribute to these conditions.

National Head Start Association
http://www.headstartinfo.org/
A link to the Head Start Information Center of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Provides access to hundreds of research reports and articles related to early childhood development and preschool education. Contains specific information on Head Start, a federally funded birth-to-preschool program that serves children and families in poverty.

U.S. Census Bureau
http://www.census.gov/
Includes data on the U.S. population, including census findings on the social and mental health and socioeconomic status of children and families of diverse cultural backgrounds.

U.S. Department of Education
http://www.ed.gov/index.jsp
Contains hundreds of links to research studies, statistical reports, articles, grants, policy statements, and other documents related to all aspects of education, including topics such as early childhood education, ethnicity, poverty and education, and early reading.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
http://www.os.dhhs.gov
Contains links to studies, articles, statistical reports, and information on current initiatives of the largest government agency that supports the health and welfare of children and families.

Special Education Sites

 Council for Exceptional Children (CEC)
http://www.cec.sped.org/
Advocates for individuals who are gifted and for those with disabilities. Has been instrumental in the successful passage of laws that have guaranteed the educational rights of students with disabilities. Has divisions (e.g., talented and gifted [TAG]) that focus on different groups of exceptional individuals.

ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education
http://ericec.org/
The official ERIC clearinghouse addressing matters on giftedness and disabilities, operated by the Council for Exceptional Children. Contains links, fact sheets, bibliographies, parent information, and other useful information.

National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY)
http://www.nichcy.org/
Provides information on disabilities and disability-related issues for families, educators, and other professionals. Has a special focus on children and youth (birth to age 22). Provides links to many articles, questions and answers, information on IDEA, and a Spanish version.

United Cerebral Palsy (UCP)
http://www.ucp.org/
One of the oldest and largest disability-related organizations, with the mission to advance the independence, productivity, and full citizenship of people with cerebral palsy and other disabilities through UCP's commitment to the principles of independence, inclusion, and self-determination.

American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)
http://www.afb.org/
Founded in 1921, a leading national resource for people who are blind or visually impaired, the organizations that serve them, and the public. Provides links in the area of visual impairments; includes a section on talking books.

Multicultural/Culture Sites

 National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME)
http://www.nameorg.org/
The leading organization in the country addressing multicultural education. Has links to articles, resources, publications, and other areas relevant to multicultural education.

University of Southern California Center for Multilingual Multicultural Research
http://www.usc.edu/dept/education/CMMR/
Provides links to Asian American, African American, Native American, and Latino/Hispanic resources; articles and audiovideo materials, including a video portion of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech.

Population Reference Bureau
http://www.prb.org/
Offers a wide range of demographic data.

U.S. Census Bureau
http://www.census.gov/
Contains demographic data, projections, links, and a wealth of information from poverty statistics to ethnic census data.

National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS)
http://www.socialstudies.org/
The largest association in the country devoted solely to social studies education.

Council of the Great City Schools
http://www.cgcs.org/
Offers many helpful resources and links (e.g., "What Works in Urban Education"), describing 155 successful urban programs.

U.S. Office for Civil Rights (OCR)
http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/index.html?src=oc
Provides numerous links to other agencies in the government; federal laws, such as ADA; information on sex, racial, age, and disability discrimination; and many other sites.

League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC)
http://www.lulac.org/
Advances for the economic condition, educational attainment, political influence, health, and civil rights of the Hispanic population of the United States. Contains links to issues such as education, census, legislation, and other Hispanic organizations.

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
http://www.naacp.org/
Addresses issues of school desegregation, fair housing, employment, and voter registration, as well as elections,

National Congress of American Indians
http://www.ncai.org
Works to inform the public and Congress on the governmental rights of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Includes a directory of tribes in the United States.

The National Urban League
http://www.nul.org/
Emphasizes greater reliance on the unique resources and strengths of the African American community to find solutions to its own problems. It has strong roots in the community that are focused on the social and educational development of youth, economic self-sufficiency, and racial inclusion. Provides several helpful links.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
EDC220: Child Growth and Development for Early Childhood and Elementary Teachers: A study of the growth and development of children, birth through the years of middle childhood. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary multicultural dimensions of development and child rearing, and their implications for teachers. Students will spend five contact hours in each of three early childhood settings: Infants/Toddler, Pre-primary and Early Elementary (K-3). 3:0:3.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Examine the typical sequence of development during the first eight years of life, as well as the wide variations in development of individual children
  2. Examine the social and cultural contexts of development
  3. Observation and record behaviors of young children


Core Assessment:
Core Assessment:
Weekly Observations with Analysis and Reflection

 


 

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
Core Assessment:

  • Observations/Interviews               10 points each = 160 total
  • Reflections                                    10 points each = 160 total
  • Portfolio Standard 1 NAEYC         30 points

Other:

  • Threaded Discussion                  10 points each = 80 total
  • Final Exam                                 50 points

Grading:
A = 432-480 points  90-100%

B = 384-431 points  80-89.9%

C = 336-383 points  70-79.9%

D = 288-335 points  60-69.9%

F =  000-287 points   00-59.9%

Late Submission of Course Materials:
A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday and Sunday.  The first week begins the first day of the semester.  Assignments must be submitted by 11:59 pm CST on Sunday of each week to receive credit. Writing assignments must be completed and successfully submitted to the Discussion thread or Drop Box (as directed by me).  If you have any problems posting your assignments, contact me immediately by Email or by phone and we'll get the problem solved. 

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
General online participation rules:

  • You should use Email for private messages to me and/or to your classmates.  The class conference area is to be used for public messages only.
  • You must participate in all conference area topics and discussions.  Conventions of "online etiquette," which include courtesy to all users, will be observe.
  • Assignment will be given each week, and discussion questions will be presented.  You are expected to complete all assignments and actively participate in all weekly online discussions.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
WEEK ONEYoung Children in Multicultural Perspective

Reading Assignment: 

Your reading assignment lays the foundation for the course of study. During this class, we will cover introductions, the syllabus and activities to help you get ready for actual observation assignments. 

Reading Assignment:

Trawick-Smith:

Chapter 1: Studying early Childhood Development in a Diverse World

Chapter 2: Historical Perspectives and Research in Early Childhood Development

Chapter 3: Theories of Child Development

            DAP-NAEYC:

                        Chapter 2: Development in the First three Years of Life

                                    Supplemental readings from the CD in your DAP text:

#16: Cultivating Good Relationships with Families Can Make Hard Times Easier

 

                         

 Field Work Assignment: NAEYC 1b, 3b, MoSTEP 1.2.3.1, 1.2.4.1

You will submit this assignment in "Dropbox” for week 1.   You will find, in the "DOC Sharing" at the top of the page, the  Observation/Interview Rubric to guide your content.

 

Interview two separate families of a young child who are distinctly different (i.e. cultural, special needs, socioeconomic) groups. Ask questions about what children are like and how they should be educated. The following questions might be considered: 

  1. What learning and behaviors should be expected of preschool-age children?
  2. What learning and behaviors should be expected of elementary school-age children?
  3. What should teachers and parents do when children of these two ages misbehave?

Take notes on your interview. Later, write an analysis guided by the following questions:

    1. How were the answers of the two parents different? How were they alike?
    2. What sources of information does the adult use to answer these questions (i.e. does this adult rely on research? on systematic observation? on personal opinion?)
    3. To what degree do answers reflect family background, culture, or other life experiences? (i.e. does this adult rely on beliefs passed down from parents or other family members? Does this adult refer to conditions in the neighborhood or community which influence thinking about children?)
    4. What can you conclude about differences in parenting beliefs and practices? How can these concepts negatively influence professional practice?

REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page. 

Grade Book- Week One

Interview                                            10 points

Interview Reflection                          10 points

Threaded Discussion                         10 points

WEEK TWO: Prenatal Development, Childbirth, and Infancy

Reading Assignment:

            Trawick-Smith:

Chapter 4: Genetics, Prenatal Development, and Birth

                        Chapter 5: The Newborn

                        Chapter 6: Infant Physical Growth and Brain Development

Fieldwork Assignment: NAEYC 1a, 3b, MoSTEP 1.2.2.1

You will submit this assignment in the Dropbox for Week 2.  You will find, in the "Doc Sharing" at the top of the page, the  Observation/Interview Rubric to guide your content. 

Observation #1:

Observe a newborn baby in a home or child care center. Write a narrative description of all behaviors you see guided by the following questions:

  1. How would you describe the baby’s general appearance (i.e. skin color, hair or lack of it, body proportions)?
  2. How would you describe this newborn’s movements? What kinds of “global wiggles” or other whole-body actions did you observe? What caused the baby to wiggle in these ways?
  3. What single body-part movements did you see (i.e. kicking a single leg, grasping with a hand)? What caused these movements to occur?
  4. How attentive was this newborn to you and the outside world? Did the baby look at you or other objects? Did the baby turn toward noises or in other ways show that he or she could hear well?
  5. Based on these observations, what can you conclude about newborn appearance, movement and perception?

REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page.

Observation #2: NAEYC 1a, 3b, MoSTEP 1.2.2.2, 1.2.4.1

Observe a group of infants of varying ages (0-12 months) in a child care setting. Select two infants who are at least 4 months apart in age. Write descriptions of their physical growth, motor abilities, and perceptual development of each, contrasting the two infants. Write a report on your observations guided by the following questions:

  1. What specific differences did you observe in physical growth, motor ability and perceptual development between the two infants you observed?
  2. What can you conclude about changes in motor abilities during these periods of infancy?

REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page.

Observation #3 NAEYC 1a, 3b, MoSTEP 1.2.2.2, 1.2.4.1

Observe two 6-12 month-old babies in child care who are of different ages. Write down descriptions of interesting behaviors they perform that show thinking or problem solving? Write a report on your observations guided by the following questions:

  1. What kinds of circular reactions were observed? Did babies perform these using their own bodies? Objects or toys? Vocalizations?
  2. Generally, how would you characterize the babies’ causal thinking? Did either baby set out to cause something to happen?
  3. What did babies do with objects? Did you see behaviors that show object permanence (i.e. Searching for a toy that was out of sight or dropping a toy and retrieving it)?
  4. What kinds of problems did you see babies solve? How did they get basic needs met? How did they retrieve toys or other desired objects?
  5. What types of imitation were observed? 
  6. Did babies emulate one another’s actions?
  7. Did babies emulate actions of adults?
  8. Did you see pseudo-imitation or deferred imitation?

REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page.

Grade Book- Week Two

 

Observation One                    10 points

Reflection One                       10 points

Observation Two                    10 points

Reflection Two                       10 points

Observation Three                 10 points

Reflection Three                    10 points

Threaded Discussion             10 points

WEEK THREE: Prenatal Development, Childbirth, and Infancy (cont)

Reading Assignment:

            Trawick-Smith:

Chapter 7: Cognitive Development in Infancy

                        Chapter 8: Infant Language and Literacy

                        Chapter 9: Infant Social and Emotional Development

            DAP- NAEYC:

                        Supplemental Reading from CD in your DAP text:

                                    #19: Developmental Milestones of Children from Birth to Age 3

                                    #22: Diversity and infant/Toddler Caregiving

                                    #58: Significance of Touch in Young Children’s Lives

Fieldwork Assignment: NAEYC 1a, 3b, MoSTEP 1.2.2.1

You will submit this assignment in the "Dropbox"for week 3 .   You will find, in  "Doc Sharing" at the top of the page, the  Observation/Interview Rubric to guide your content. 

Observation #1:

Observe an infant (0-6 months). Write down descriptions of interesting behaviors that show the following:

  1. What signs of attention or memory do you observe?
  2. What signs of receptive language do you observe
  3. How does the baby react to sudden noises or textures
  4. Interview the parent/caretaker to determine the babies temperament

 REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page

 Observation #2:

Observe as child care providers interact with infants or toddlers. Take notes on their responsiveness and warmth, as described in your readings. Write a report on these behaviors guided by the following questions:

  1. What specific responding behaviors did you see? What effect did these responses have on the infants or toddlers?
  2. What warm or nurturing behaviors did you see? What effect did they have?
  3. If you observed more than one caregiver, did you see differences in how each interacted with infants or toddlers in these areas? To what would you attribute caregiver differences in warmth or responsiveness?

 REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page

Grade Book – Week Three

Observation One                                10 points

Reflection One                                   10 points

Observation Two                                10 points

Reflection Two                                   10 points

Threaded Discussion                         10 points

WEEK FOUR: Development in the Preschool Years

Reading Assignment:

            Trawick-Smith:

                        Chapter 10: Preschool Physical and Motor Development

                        Chapter 11: Cognitive Development in the Preschool Years

            DAP-NAEYC:

Chapter 4: Developmentally Appropriate Practice in the Preschool Years—Ages 3-5: An Interview

Fieldwork Assignments: NAEYC 1a, 1b, MoSTEP 1.2.2.2, 1.2.4.1

You will submit this assignment in the “Dropbox"for week 4.  You will find, in "Doc Sharing" at the top of the page, the  Observation/Interview Rubric to guide your content.  

Observation #1:

Observe a preschool boy or girl of approximately the same age as they engage in motor play in a child care center or preschool. Take notes on their motor activities. Write a report comparing their play, guided by the following questions:

1.      What types of play did you observe which were common to both children (i.e. climbing games, throwing, and running)?

2.      What differences did you observe in the two children’s play preferences?

3.      Did you observe differences in activity level or rough and tumble play?

4.      Did you see motor activities that appeared to be influenced by gender? Generally, to what degree you think that gender explains differences in motor play of the two children.

REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page.

Observation #2

Observe a preschool child for at lease one hour in a classroom. As you observe, record any evidence of a developing theory of the mind. Watch for indicators of the child’s theories about emotional states, intentions and motives, and knowing and remembering. Pay special attention to the words the child uses. Later write a report on your observation guided by the following questions.

1.      What language or social behaviors did you observe, if any, which indicate that this child understands internal emotional states?

2.      What indicators were there, if any, that the child was aware of motives and intentions?

3.      What behaviors did you observe that showed the child was aware internal processes of learning, remembering, and knowing?

 REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page

Grade Book – Week Four

Observation One                                  10 points

Reflection One                                       10 points

Observation Two                                  10 points

Reflection Two                                     10 points

Threaded Discussion                             10 points

WEEK FIVE: Development in the Preschool Years (cont)

 

Reading Assignment:

            Trawick-Smith:

Chapter 12: Symbolic Thought: Play, Language, and Literacy in the Preschool Years

Chapter 13: Social and Emotional Development of Preschoolers

            DAP- NAEYC

Chapter 6: Developmentally appropriate Practice in the Kindergarten year – Ages 5-6: An Overview

Supplemental Reading can be found on your CD in your DAP text

#68: What the Research Says about Young Children’s Listening and language Learning

Field Work Assignments: NAEYC 1a, 1b, MoSTEP 1.2.2.2, 1.2.4.1

You will submit this assignment in the "Dropbox" for week 5 .  You will find, in "Doc Sharing" at the top of the page,  the  Observation/Interview Rubric to guide your content. 

Observation #1

Observe a preschool classroom in which children of diverse cultural backgrounds are enrolled. Take notes on any sociodramatic episodes which you see, based on from your readings. Later, write a report describing this form of play, guided by the following questions:

1.      What kinds of make-believe did you see (i.e. pretend use of objects, role playing, and make-believe situations)? Give at least three examples from your observations.

2.      How would you characterize the social interactions you observed during sociodramatic play episodes? Give examples from your observations..

3.      Describe the language, which you heard during sociodramatic play episodes. Did children assume adult-like intonations and sentences? Did they use pretend voices? How much verbalization occurred?

4.      How did boys and girls differ in their play theses and roles? Did children of different cultural backgrounds play in different ways?

REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page.

Observation #2

Observe a teacher of young children (Pre-K or Kindergarten) and take notes on classroom interaction. Later, write an analysis of your observation guided by the following questions:

  1. What elements of a maturationist perspective did you see in the teacher’s interactions with children (i.e. tolerance of immature behavior, postponing tasks, or activities for some children until they are “ready”)?
  2. What elements of a behaviorist perspective did you see (i.e. using praise or rewards, ignoring misbehavior, “catching children being good”, modeling positive behaviors)?
  3. What elements of a psychoanalytic theory did you observe (i.e. promoting attachment, encouraging autonomy and initiative)?
  4. What elements of a cognitive-development did you see (i.e. encouraging children to construct their own learning through action, helping children to interpret/understand social situations)?
  5. What elements of sociocultural perspectives did you observe (verbal theory, self directed speech, scaffolding, or periods of zone of proximal development)?

REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page.

Observation #3

Observe an entire classroom of preschool-age children. Watch for examples of the social and emotional development as reviewed in your readings. Write a description of each of the following behaviors you observe (you might not see ALL of them)

  1. Altruistic behavior (acts of kindness, sharing, helping, comforting, etc)
  2. Empathy (vicarious feelings of emotion or physical pain)
  3. Aggression (teasing, hitting, reaction to peer aggression, unprovoked aggression, or bulling, etc.)
  4. Nonaggressive behaviors (rough and tumble play, teasing play, assertiveness, conflict and arguments).

INTERVENTIONS: Write an essay based on your observations to address what interventions you might use to meet good social emotional development in your classroom.

REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page

Grade Book – Week Five

Observation One                                10 points

Reflection One                                   10 points

Observation Two                                10 points

Reflection Two                                   10 points

Observation Three                             10 points

Reflection Three                                10 points

Threaded Discussion                         10 points

WEEK SIX: The Primary Years in Cultural Context

Reading Assignment:

            Trawick-Smith:

Chapter 14: Physical Growth and Motor Development in the Primary Years

                        Chapter 15: Cognition and Schooling

DAP- NAEYC:

Chapter 8: Developmentally Appropriate practice in the Primary Grades— Ages 6-: an Overview

Field Work Assignments: NAEYC 1a, 3b MoSTEP 1.2.2.2, 1.2.4.1

 

Observation #1

You will submit this assignment in the "Dropbox”for week 6.  You will find, in "Doc Sharing" at the top of the page, the  Observation/Interview Rubric to guide your content. 

Observe a classroom of first, second OR third-graders. Take notes on the diversity and stature and activity level of children. Later, write a report on your observations guided by the following questions:

  1. To what degree did children’s height and weight vary? Did you observe culture or gender differences in stature?
  2. How well were children able to sit still and attend to classroom activities?
  3. To what degree did motor development vary?
  4. What cultural or gender differences in abilities did you observe?

REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page.

Observation #2

 Ask a primary-grade child to make a map of the school, their home or neighborhood. As the child draws, ask about the locations and objects depicted on the map, the distances between places, and other map space questions. Later, write a report on your observations guided by the following questions:

  1. How would assess the child’s performance in map-making? In what ways was the child’s map different from the way an adult might draw?
  2. Was the map drawn to scale? Were landmarks depicted? Which details were included in the map? Which important landmarks were omitted?
  3. What can you conclude about the development of map space in children of this age?

REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page.

Presentation: For the map assignment, you must post your map (you may do this either by scanning the map or taking a digital icture of it) and write your narrative in threaded discussion.  Rubric link.Please respond to at least one of your classmates.  

 

WEEK 7 The Primary Years in Cultural Context (cont)

Observation #1

Observe social language and literacy of two children in a classroom. Later write a report based on the following questions:

Language:

  1. Were the children effective in communicating with and persuading peers? Were both children equally competent in language-to-peers?
  2. What examples did you observe in the rules of school language described in your readings? Did the two children use polite, formal language? Were they effective in asking or answering questions in class? What differences did you observe?

Literacy:

  1. What stage of writing do you believe each child to be in and what evidence supports your decision?
  2. What state of reading do you believe each child to be in and what evidence supports your decision?

Correlations: What correlations did you observe between each child’s language and literacy development?

REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page

Observation #2

 

Observe primary-age children interacting in a classroom or playground. Make careful notes. Write a report based on the following questions:

  1. What evidence did you use to identify social acceptance or rejection?
  2. What evidence did you use to identify competence?
  3. What evidence did you use to identify moral self worth?
  4. What evidence did you use to identify control?
  5. If you interviewed the teacher, do you think s/he would support your speculations? What further evidence might you need to make more accurate assessments?
  6. What interventions might you use in your classroom for supporting positive peer relationships?

REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1 page

 Grade Book – Week Seven

 

Observation One                    10 points

Reflection One                       10 points

Observation Two                    10 points

Reflection Two                       10 points

Threaded Discussion             10 points

 

WEEK EIGHT                    
Chapter 17: Social and Emotional Development in the Primary Years

Field Work: NAEYC 1a, 3b, MoSTEP 1.2.2.2, 1.2.4.1

You will submit this assignment in the "Dropbox" for Week 8.    You will find in “Doc Sharing", at the top of the page, the  Observation/Interview Rubric to guide your content.

 

Reading Assignment:

             Trawick-Smith:
                        Chapter 18: Parents, Families, and Children: A Multicultural Perspective

INTERVIEW- Family Communication in Quality Child Care

 

Interview the director of a child care center accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. Ask the director to share with you the methods used for family–center communication. If the center serves families of different cultures, inquire as to methods for communicating with families who may be non–English speaking. If possible, share references of samples of print materials with your classmates.

 

This interview will be posted as a threaded discussion. It is important that you share ideas with your classmates so you all will have a list of strategies for your classroom or center.

 

REFLECTION: Complete your assignment with a well-developed reflection that connects your observations to the reading and considers your learning from this assignment. This part of the assignment is important and should be at least ½ to 1

 

Grade Book- Week Eight

 

Interview                      10 points

Reflection                     10 points

Threaded Discussion     10 points

 

 

Project FINAL: Write to the NAEYC Standard 1 for portfolio. The rubric for this standard is provided to help you with your content. This will be submitted to the instructor through “doc sharing” with artifacts. 30 points

 

 PROCTORED FINAL -  50 points- 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: Students must participate in an academically related activity on a weekly basis in order to be marked present in an online class. Examples of academically-related activities include but are not limited to: contributing to an online discussion, completing a quiz or exam, completing an assignment, initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a courserelated question, or using any of the learning management system tools.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 96

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .


Attachments:
Rubric for Observations and Interviews

NAEYC Portfolio Rubric

BAEYC rubric for Standard 1

Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Analysis (1)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Outcomes
1, 2, 3______points NAEYC 1a, 1b 3a MoSTEP 1.2.2, 1.2.3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Provides descriptive and objective accounts of the setting, teaching strategies, and learning experiences observed Brief accounts of teaching strategies and learning experiences Little effort to help reader visualize setting, interactions or learning experiences No Evidence 
Analysis (2)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Outcomes
1, 2, 3______points NAEYC 1a, 1b, 3a MoSTEP 1.2.2, 1.2.3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Provides descriptive and objective accounts of the children's participation, responses, initiative, etc. Brief accounts of the children's responses Little if any attention to children's responses No Evidence 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 5 ______points NAEYCc 1a, 1b, 3aMKoSTEP 1.2.2, 1.2.3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Responses are well developed with explanations of two or more relevant examples (for each question) from fieldwork.




How are these learnings helping you know and understand young children's  characteristics and needs?  How are these learnings helping you know and understand to multiple influences on development and learning.




 
Responses address questions with reference to at least one example from fieldwork (for each question)  How are these learning helping you to know and understand young children's characteristics and needs?  How are these learnings helping you know and understand the multiple influences on development and learning Responses are well developed with explanations of two or more relevant examples (for each question) from fieldwork.  How are these learning helping you know and understand younhg children's characteristics and needs?  How are these leranings helping you know and understand the multiple influences on development and learning? No Evidence 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 2, 3______points NAEYC 1a, 1b 3a MoSTEP 1.2.2, 1.2.3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Reflections:  Clearly explain the purposes of the interview or observation in the field site, include graphic representation and/or samples of children's work Reflections Briefly reference the purposes of the interview or observation in the field site, including graphic representation and/or samples of children's work. Reflections: Little if any explanation is given for the purposes of the interview or observation in the field site including graphic representation and/or samples of children's work No Evidence 
Technical Skill in Communicating (1)                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 5______points                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Careful attention to spelling and grammar Several minor errors in spelling and grammar (305) Substantial errors in spelling and grammar (more than 5) No Evidence 
Technical Sill in Communicating (2)                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 5______points                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Explicit connections are made to course readings Well organized paragraphs help the reader follow your thinking Some connections to reading but often not explicit




Organized paragraphs but some difficulty in following your thinking




 
Readings are not referenced




Construction of paragraphs is confusing




 
No Evidence 
Disciplinary Competency (1)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
2, 5 MoSTEP 1.2.2, 1.2.3 NAEYC Standard 1- Candidates use their understanding of young children's characteristics and needs, and of multiple interacting influences on children's development and learning to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for all children.1a: Knowing and understanding younr children's characteristics______points                                                                                                                              
Examines and documents the typical sequence of development during the first eight years of life, (Infant/toddler, pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten through 3rd. grade) as well as a wide variations in development of individual children. Examines and documents the typical sequence of development during the first eight years of life in 2 out of 3 of the stages (infant/Toddler, Pre-Kindergarten and K-3) in development of individual children Examines and documents the typical sequence of development during the first eight years of life in at least 1 of the 3 stages (infant/toddler, pre-kindergarten and K-3) in development of individual children No Evidence 
Disciplinary Competency (2)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
5 MoSTEP 1.2.2, 1.2.3 NAEYC Standard 1 (above) 1b: Knowing and understanding the multiple influences on development and learning ______points                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Examines and documents at least 3 different examples of the multiple influences on development and learning. (i.e. social, cultural, medical, etc) Examines and documents at least 2 or the multiple influences on development and learning. Examines and documents at least 1 of the multiple influences on development and learning. No Evidence 

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Last Updated:7/13/2011 11:03:30 AM