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EN 232 Introduction to Poetry
Lapinel-Spincken, Jennifer


Mission Statement: The mission of Park University, an entrepreneurial institution of learning, is to provide access to academic excellence, which will prepare learners to think critically, communicate effectively and engage in lifelong learning while serving a global community.

Vision Statement: Park University will be a renowned international leader in providing innovative educational opportunities for learners within the global society.

Course

EN 232 Introduction to Poetry

Semester

F1T 2011 DL

Faculty

Lapinel-Spincken, Jennifer

Title

Adjunct Faculty of English

Degrees/Certificates

M.A. in English Literature from New York University
B.A. in English Literature and Creative Writing from New York University

Office Location

Virtual

Office Hours

Mondays, Wednesdays 10am-11am, ET (and by appointment)

E-Mail

Jennifer.LapinelSpincken@park.edu

JLSParkUniversity@live.com

Semester Dates

08/15/2011 to 10/09/2011

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Meyer, Michael. Poetry: An Introduction.  6th edition. Boston: Bedford, St. Martin's, 2010.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
EN232 Introduction to Poetry (MGE): A study of approaches to reading, understanding, and analyzing lyric poetry in English and American literature. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:

What impresses me most about literature is the way it cross references so many other aspects of culture, history, religion, morality, art and society. All of these are often reflected in literary works, and when read, help us to create a web of understanding that hopefully transcends our usual thinking.

My desire is to assist all of you in discovering that these aspects of study are important to the well-rounded, worldly mind. Through our experience we will all mature with a broader understanding and an ability to view literature through a variety of lenses.

Exploring literature exercises our thinking and helps us rise above our traditional day-to-day thought. The critical thinking involved in our analysis and exploration will prepare us with a comprehensive set of tools that will allow us to stand out from the masses in our chosen careers.

Probably the most critical element to our success this term is that we stay connected and promote communication. It is my wish that we create an environment where even the most tentative student feels comfortable in reaching out. Please feel free to email me with any questions and/or concerns as I check my email throughout each day and am always happy to hear from all of you.

Of equal importance in learning, online or otherwise, is that we maintain an environment of respect. All correspondence with peers, including feedback and critiques, need to be delivered with the utmost regard for upholding the principles of kindness and respect. We are all working our way through life with our own unique difficulties; flexibility and adaptability are essential to creating the most fruitful learning environment.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify the definitive features of poetry as a literary genre
  2. Discuss a representative range of poetic texts
  3. Articulate a response/ interpretation of a single text or body of related texts


Core Assessment:

All Park University courses will include a Core Assessment with rubric. This will include ¾ of the Core LearningOutcomes listed above. The Core Assessment in this course will be a major critical paper of no fewer than 5 pages, which will include research and MLA documentation. The project will be completed in the final quarter of the term.


 The rubric for this assignment is published so the student can see the expectations. 

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Discussion Thread Rubric

Points

Measurement of Discussion Thread

15

a) Posting shows a clear and insightful analysis of question, lengthy in response (350 words or more), with specific examples from the text. Application of poetic terminology from assigned chapters shows firm grasp of concepts.
b) Additional response to fellow student is also clear and insightful with ample detail, excellent use of poetic terminology, and collegial disputation. Response is a minimum of long enough to show deep engagement. Suggested length: about 100 words or more). NOTE: Word count does NOT include copying the question.

13

a) Thoughtful insight, complete in length (250-300 words), with references to the text and a strong sense of how the poem works. Application of poetic terminology from assigned chapters is good, with only occasional gaps.
b) Additional response to fellow student is satisfactory, with meaningful detail, very good use of poetic terminology, and collegial disputation. Focus is clearly on the poetry. Length is long enough to show ample engagement. Suggested length: 75-100 words.

11

a) Acceptable analysis, minimal in length (under 200 words). Main ideas are presented clearly, though more detail is needed. Application of poetic terminology from assigned chapters is generally good, but may reveal occasional gaps in understanding.
b) Additional response to fellow student is clear but minimal. Comments tend to be collegial, but lack rigorous critical analysis or disputation. Use of poetic terminology is slight. Suggested length: 50-75 words or more.)

8

a) Spotty discussion of text, minimal in length, lacks full understanding or does not express ideas clearly. Lacks specific examples. Uses little poetic terminology from assigned reading, or does not apply terminology in any meaningful way. Tends to over focus on personal feelings without explaining how the poem evokes such feelings.
b) Additional response to fellow student is minimal, unclear, or does not provide relevant observations. The response may wander from the question or suggest lack of careful reading of assignment.

6

a) Spotty discussion with minimal length of under 150 words. Response shows little or no evidence of clear understanding of poetic concepts. Application of poetic terminology is weak.
b) Additional response to fellow student is minimal or garbled, lacks detail, or simply states, “I like what you said” without any attempt at disputation or analysis.

0

Does not meet expectations because of lack of length, lack of detail, poorly expressed, does not participate, does not apply poetic terminology, or does not meet deadlines.

See Grading Rubric for Week 1 Response Paper (20 points) below:

Points

Focus

Organization

Detail

Mechanics

19-20

Title and introductory paragraph set up sharp focus on a fresh idea with a clearly stated purpose.

Organization is logical, relevant, easy to follow and compelling to read. Transitions are smooth and lead the reader effortlessly through the paper.

Uses well-chosen quotes from the poems; explanations are logical and convincing. Personal perspectives provide are convincing and to the point.

The paper skillfully and artfully employs Standard Written English in a strong personal voice. Use of quotes are skillfully documented using MLA. Meets or exceeds length requirement and follows all instructions.

17-18

Well chosen and appropriate focus, with only occasional lapses from primary purpose.

Organization is easy to follow though sometimes lacks needed transitions.

Good use of detail, and analysis, with appropriately chosen quotes. Strong sense of personal exploration.

The paper shows a strong command of Standard Written English with only occasional gaps. Follows instructions. Adequate use of MLA documentation for quotes. Meets length requirement without apparent struggle.

14-16

The paper begins with a good focus, but strays from the point.

The organization is mostly clear, though occasional digressions are not explained and distract the reader.

Detailed examples are good, though connections are not always clear; explanations are adequate but repetitive with little new insight. Personal voice is evident, though sometimes gets lost.

The paper shows a basic command of Standard Written English, but is often wordy or awkwardly phrased. Documentation of quotes shows some problems with format.
May fall short of length requirement; may not follow all instructions.

12-13

The paper lacks a strong, clear focus. The point is vague and unclear.

The organization is difficult to follow, lacks helpful signposts, or fails to provide logical and convincing rationales.

Detail is vague, with little or no explanation. More specific examples are needed or connections lack explanation. Personal insights are irrelevant, inadequately explained, or unconvincing.

The paper does not follow the conventions of SWE and contains many surface errors, preventing the reader from understanding the point. Quotes lack adequate documentation. Either falls short of length requirement or wanders with no clear direction. May not follow all instructions.

10-11

The paper lacks a coherent point, presents puzzling claims, and exhibits lack of understanding of assignment.

The organization shows confusion and lack of direction.

Detail is vague, quotes are missing or irrelevant, or paper does not respond to requirements of the assignment. Personal insights are irrelevant or puzzling.

The writing shows a lack of attention to SWE and documentation, and uses an inappropriate voice. Disregards instructions and requirements.

0

Does not turn in assignment or paper is insufficient in all areas.




 

 

See Grading Rubric for Week 3 Response Paper (25 points) below:

Points

Focus

Organization

Detail

Mechanics

23-25

Title and introductory paragraph set up sharp focus on a fresh idea with a clearly stated purpose.

Organization is logical, relevant, easy to follow and compelling to read. Transitions are smooth and lead the reader effortlessly through the paper.

Uses well-chosen quotes from the poems; explanations are logical and convincing. Personal perspectives provide are convincing and to the point.

The paper skillfully and artfully employs Standard Written English in a strong personal voice. Use of quotes are skillfully documented using MLA. Meets or exceeds length requirement and follows all instructions.

20-22

Well chosen and appropriate focus, with only occasional lapses from primary purpose.

Organization is easy to follow though sometimes lacks needed transitions.

Good use of detail, and analysis, with appropriately chosen quotes. Strong sense of personal exploration.

The paper shows a strong command of Standard Written English with only occasional gaps. Follows instructions. Adequate use of MLA documentation for quotes. Meets length requirement without apparent struggle.

17-19

The paper begins with a good focus, but strays from the point.

The organization is mostly clear, though occasional digressions are not explained and distract the reader.

Detailed examples are good, though connections are not always clear; explanations are adequate but repetitive with little new insight. Personal voice is evident, though sometimes gets lost.

The paper shows a basic command of Standard Written English, but is often wordy or awkwardly phrased. Documentation of quotes shows some problems with format.
May fall short of length requirement; may not follow all instructions.

14-16

The paper lacks a strong, clear focus. The point is vague and unclear.

The organization is difficult to follow, lacks helpful signposts, or fails to provide logical and convincing rationales.

Detail is vague, with little or no explanation. More specific examples are needed or connections lack explanation. Personal insights are irrelevant, inadequately explained, or unconvincing.

The paper does not follow the conventions of SWE and contains many surface errors, preventing the reader from understanding the point. Quotes lack adequate documentation. Either falls short of length requirement or wanders with no clear direction. May not follow all instructions.

13 and below

The paper lacks a coherent point, presents puzzling claims, and exhibits lack of understanding of assignment.

The organization shows confusion and lack of direction.

Detail is vague, quotes are missing or irrelevant, or paper does not respond to requirements of the assignment. Personal insights are irrelevant or puzzling.

The writing shows a lack of attention to SWE and documentation, and uses an inappropriate voice. Disregards instructions and requirements.

0

Does not turn in assignment or paper is insufficient in all areas.




 

See Grading Rubric for Week 5 Response Paper (35 points) below:

Points

Focus

Organization

Detail

Mechanics

32-35

Title and introductory paragraph set up sharp focus on a fresh idea with a clearly stated purpose.

Organization is logical, relevant, easy to follow and compelling to read. Transitions are smooth and lead the reader effortlessly through the paper.

Uses well-chosen quotes from the poems; explanations are logical and convincing. Personal perspectives provide are convincing and to the point.

The paper skillfully and artfully employs Standard Written English in a strong personal voice. Use of quotes are skillfully documented using MLA. Meets or exceeds length requirement and follows all instructions.

28-31

Well chosen and appropriate focus, with only occasional lapses from primary purpose.

Organization is easy to follow though sometimes lacks needed transitions.

Good use of detail, and analysis, with appropriately chosen quotes. Strong sense of personal exploration.

The paper shows a strong command of Standard Written English with only occasional gaps. Follows instructions. Adequate use of MLA documentation for quotes. Meets length requirement without apparent struggle.

24-27

The paper begins with a good focus, but strays from the point.

The organization is mostly clear, though occasional digressions are not explained and distract the reader.

Detailed examples are good, though connections are not always clear; explanations are adequate but repetitive with little new insight. Personal voice is evident, though sometimes gets lost.

The paper shows a basic command of Standard Written English, but is often wordy or awkwardly phrased. Documentation of quotes shows some problems with format.
May fall short of length requirement; may not follow all instructions.

19-23

The paper lacks a strong, clear focus. The point is vague and unclear.

The organization is difficult to follow, lacks helpful signposts, or fails to provide logical and convincing rationales.

Detail is vague, with little or no explanation. More specific examples are needed or connections lack explanation. Personal insights are irrelevant, inadequately explained, or unconvincing.

The paper does not follow the conventions of SWE and contains many surface errors, preventing the reader from understanding the point. Quotes lack adequate documentation. Either falls short of length requirement or wanders with no clear direction. May not follow all instructions.

18 and below

The paper lacks a coherent point, presents puzzling claims, and exhibits lack of understanding of assignment.

The organization shows confusion and lack of direction.

Detail is vague, quotes are missing or irrelevant, or paper does not respond to requirements of the assignment. Personal insights are irrelevant or puzzling.

The writing shows a lack of attention to SWE and documentation, and uses an inappropriate voice. Disregards instructions and requirements.

0

Does not turn in assignment or paper is insufficient in all areas.




RUBRIC FOR FIRST DRAFT of ANTHOLOGY PROJECT:

Points


10

Includes all required components for First Draft:

1. Title Page with name of anthology and name of editor;

2. Table of Contents with titles of poems to be discussed;

3. Clear rationale for anthology;

4. Draft discussion of poems with ample detail;

5. Evidence of a clear direction and thoughtful planning.

5

First draft submitted, but lacks all required components, or does not provide enough evidence of a clear direction, although it is possible to see what the writer has in mind..

0

Does not submit, or submits a paper that is too undeveloped or unclear to shed light on writer’s plans for the anthology. Essential detail is missing.

RUBRIC FOR FINAL DRAFT OF CRITICAL PAPER: ANTHOLOGY PROJECT

 Points

Focus

Rationale

Organization

Analysis/

Close Reading

SWE and Documentation

63-70

Sharp, well defined and innovative.

Anthology’s theme is innovative and explained clearly and thoroughly.  Choice of poems is thoughtful with innovative connections.

Organization is logical, relevant, easy to follow and compelling to read. Transitions are smooth and lead the reader effortlessly through the paper.

Sustained attention to elements of poetry with skilled use of close reading techniques that convincingly assesses meaning and shows creative insight. Details are relevant and fully explained.

The paper skillfully and artfully employs Standard Written English in a strong personal voice. Use of quotes skillfully documented using MLA style. Meets or exceeds length requirement. Includes all components, going beyond the minimum.

56-62

Clear focus, with only occasional lapses from primary purpose.

Approach to anthology’s theme is innovative. Explanation  is not always clear. Rationale for selection of poems good.

Organization is easy to follow though sometimes lacks needed transitions.

Good attention to elements of poetry with good use of close reading; evidence of exceptional insight. Use of detail is good and relevant to central argument.

Strong command of Standard Written English with only occasional gaps. Adequate use of MLA. Meets length requirement documentation.

Follows instructions.

49-55

Good initial focus, but paper strays from the point.

Approach is acceptable but predictable with little new insight;  thematic grouping of poems is good but lacks full rationale.

The organization is mostly clear, though occasional digressions are not explained and distract the reader.

Spotty attention to elements of poetry, with weak or incomplete use of close reading. Detail is vague, though connections are acceptable despite lack of full discussion.

Adequate command of Standard Written English. Documentation problematic.

May fall short of length requirement, or may not include all required components.

41-48

The paper lacks a strong, clear focus. The point is vague and unclear.

Does not make a convincing argument for why the poems chosen belong together, or relies on ideas that are obvious or overdone.

The organization is difficult to follow, lacks helpful signposts, or fails to provide logical connections.

Little attention to elements of poetry, with incomplete and unconvincing interpretation. No sufficient evidence of skill in close reading.

Detail is vague, irrelevant, or unexplained.

Lacks understanding of the conventions of SWE. Contains many surface errors, Inadequate documentation. Does not meet length requirement. May not include all required components.

30-40

The paper lacks a coherent point, presents puzzling claims, and exhibits poor understanding of assignment.

The thematic approach is minimally explained and choice of poems remains obvious or simplistic.

The organization shows confusion and lack of direction.

Puzzling use of poetic terms without appropriate examples. Detail is scattered, with no coherent discussion, and leaves the reader dissatisfied.

The writing shows a lack of attention to SWE and documentation, and uses an inappropriate voice. Disregards assignment requirements.

0

Does not turn in assignment or paper is insufficient in all areas.





Grading:

Core Assessment: Critical Paper

The Core Assessment for this course is a critical paper consisting of 5-8 pages. The paper will include research in addition to personal statements; internal MLA documentation; Works Cited page.

A draft will be due in week 7. The final, polished paper will due in Week 8. The due date for this paper will be Sunday night at 11:59 of Week 8.

**NOTE: A DRAFT of the final paper must be submitted no later than SATURDAY at 11:59 of WEEK 7.

Students who do not submit a DRAFT of the final paper will earn 0 points for the critical paper, and may not submit a final draft paper. This means a grade of “F” will be assigned to the core assessment, which is 30% of the final grade.

What is a draft? As you no doubt learned in your Freshman writing courses, a draft is a rough exploration of your project. A draft is not perfect; it does not include everything. However, it should be focused enough, and include enough detail to illustrate to your reader your topic, your point of view, and how you I intend to develop the paper. It should include the Works Cited page, and the quotations you intend to examine.

Why do I ask for a draft? I require a draft so that I can see what you intend to do, and can offer suggestions and advice. You will receive feedback on your draft by Sunday evening. You will then have a week to revise the draft and submit it the following week.

Click on the link below to go to the Syllabus site to select and view the Core Assessment Rubric for this course:

Core Assessment Rubric

Weekly Learning Activities and Assessments: Discussion Threads, Response Papers, and Quizzes

Students will be asked to respond to course readings, prompts, and materials by posting weekly Discussion Threads, by writing Response Papers, and by taking occasional quizzes and exams. Each of these assignments is described below, and more detail is provided for each specific weekly assignment.

a. Discussion Threads: Due Wednesday and Friday of each week.

Each week, each of you will post a response to a prompt or question based on the week’s reading. Your first posting is due no later than Wednesday 11:59 CT; the second posting is due no later than Friday 11.59 CT.

Points possible for Discussion Threads: 10 points are rewarded for discussion postings that are fully developed with detail according to the Rubric for Discussion Threads. (See Rubric under “Discussion Threads” button for each week.)

b. Response Papers: Due on Sunday evenings no later than 11:59.

A total of 3 short Response Papers will be submitted throughout the term. These papers will explore one or more of the poems in the assigned reading. Each will be progressively longer as we progress through the term.

Although response papers analyze the poetry with attention to specific features of poetry addressed in that week’s reading assignment, these papers are not “research papers.” They are your reactions to a question provided by the professor, or to an assigned “Considerations” question following the poem in your textbook. They should be written in your own voice (using “I”), not in the voice of an unidentifiable “research persona.” Poetry is personal; your reactions are personal. Therefore, your writing will be personal. At the same time, you are learning in this course how to analyze poetry.

Being personal in this course does not mean you are writing to your best friend. It means that you are writing as a real student of poetry to another reader of poetry (in this case, yes, your professor). Audience and purpose are important; pretending to be an unidentifiable (and perhaps pompous) academic is not the goal. Learning to analyze what is important to you is the goal, as is learning to document specific lines from the poem(s) you are analyzing.

More detail for each Response Paper is provided with each specific assignment.

c. Quizzes: Submitted no later than Sunday at 11:59.

When you are not asked to write a Response Paper, you will be asked to take a short-answer quiz over the readings for that week. (These are planned for Weeks 2, 4, and 6). These will be short-answer quizzes, or based on the readings for that week.

Points for these exams may vary from week to week depending on the demands of the quiz/exam.

d. Final Exam:

A final, written exam worth 60 points will be given during Finals Week. You should be prepared to write a short critical essay, which will include some personal response (just as you have done in the response papers), based on a question and a poem you will be given at the time of the exam.

If you keep up with the work in the course, including the Discussion Threads, the Response Papers, the critical paper, and all the reading, this exam should actually present you with work that will be intellectually stimulating and rewarding. You might even enjoy it!

Participation:

Students are expected to participate in all class activities. This includes checking in weekly and responding to discussion thread questions; keeping up with the reading; submitting assignments; etc. If you conscientiously keep up with weekly reading and writing assignments, the question of participation will not even arise as a problem.

You must realize that passing this course is impossible unless you keep up with weekly reading and writing assignments. Participation is a given: you must submit postings to Discussion Threads, and submit all other work on time in order to earn enough points to pass this course. Grades on all these assignments indicate participation, the most significant indicator being your timely presence, and depth of response, in class Discussion Threads.

We will move quickly through the term; don’t stop or hesitate. Just do the best you can do, and keep up with the work.

Late Assignments:

Because of the nature of this online, 8-week course, late assignments are not an option. Discussion Threads may not be posted late for obvious reasons: your lack of participation directly affects the entire class, since you will not be responding to the questions of the week, or to the comments of your classmates.

The best advice about submitting assignments is this: never wait until the deadline to submit your work. Things happen: computers break down; internet connections don’t work or are interrupted; you get sick. So: Plan Ahead. Manage your time. Even if you can’t do it all, do what you can. Submit something rather than nothing. Don’t panic, and don’t give up. You are smart, and you can do this.

Class Assessment:

The following student projects will be assessed:

  • Discussion Threads
  • Response Papers
  • Quizzes
  • Critical Paper (Core Assessment)
  • Final Essay Exam

Grading Scale:

Assignment

Points

Percent

Final Grading Scale

Discussion Threads
10pts and 5pts

120

30%

A  360 – 400

3 Response Papers
20, 25, and 35pts.

90

20%

B  320 - 359

3 Quizzes
20pts. ea.

60

15%

C  280 - 319

Critical Paper*
Draft 10pts Final 70 pts

80

20%

D  240 - 279

Final Essay Exam**

60

15%

F 239 and below

TOTAL POINTS

400

100%


NOTE:
*Failure to turn both draft and final draft of the critical paper will result in a failing grade for the course.
**Failure to take the final essay exam will result in a failing grade for the course.

Late Submission of Course Materials:

There are no extensions or make-ups for discussion threads for any reason.

Work must be written in Microsoft Word and double-spaced using Times New Roman, 12 point font.  Extra Credit will not be offered.

Work submitted to previous courses are not to be submitted to this course. All work for this course must be original.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

We are about to embark on an exciting journey together. This journey will be challenging at times and will allow you to flex your cognitive muscles as you try things you may have never attempted before in analysis and writing.

Before we get started, I would like to give you a few guidelines for our work together as a good, trusting, collaborative environment is built through mutual respect and careful, meditative action.

When responding to peer posts, please use full sentences, proper Standard English (with correct grammar) and always address peers by name. Posts should never belittle or address personal issues, but should always pertain to the work at hand and have a professional, respectful tone. Your posts should add comprehensively to the discussion and, in some way, aid your peers in their learning process, as it will undoubtedly help you in yours. Please avoid using capital letters and exclamations as these can both be perceived as shouting. I also expect all students to avoid slang or any offensive language.

When posting to the discussion board, or question area, please avoid discussing personal issues, including grades. These types of exchanges should be carried out privately through email.

These same standards apply when corresponding with me, or any of your fellow students, through email. Please always maintain a respectful and professional tone. When emailing, please also introduce yourself each time and include the course number in your reference line (Re:). 

I look forward to working with you all through the coming weeks. Please never hesitate to contact me as I very much enjoy hearing from my students.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1:           Getting Started: how do we read poetry?

                        Introduction: “Reading Imaginative Literature”

                        Chapter 1, “Reading Poetry”

                        Chapter 2, “Writing about Poetry”

                        Discussion Thread (15pts)

                        Response Paper on assigned poem (20pts)

Week 2:           Chapter 3, “Word Choice, Word Order, and Tone”

                        Chapter 4, “Images”

                        Chapter 5, “Figures of Speech”

                        Discussion Thread (15pts)

                        Quiz on tone, imagery, and figures of speech (20pts)

Week 3:           Chapter 6, “Symbol, Allegory, and Irony”

                        Chapter 7, “Sounds”

                        Chapter 12: “A Study of Emily Dickinson”

                        Discussion Thread (15 pts)

                        Response Paper on Dickinson (25pts)

Week 4:           Chapter 8, “Patterns of Rhythm”

                        Chapter 9, “Poetic Forms”

                        Chapter 10, “Open Form”

                        Discussion Thread (15pts)

                        Quiz on poetic forms (20pts)

           

Week 5:           Chapter 11, “Combining the Elements of Poetry:

                        A Writing Process”

                        Chapter 17, “Critical Case Study: T.S. Eliot’s

                        ‘The Lovesong of J. Alfred Prurock’”

                        Discussion Thread (15pts)

                        Response Paper on J. Alfred Prufrock (35pts)

Week 6:           Chapter 18, “A Thematic Case Study: Love and Longing”

Also read the following additional poems on the theme of love and longing:

“Bonny Barbara Allen”
William Blake,”The Garden of Love”
Robert Burns, “A Red, Red Rose”
A.E. Housman, “Is my team ploughing?”
Ben Jonson, “To Celia”

Chapter 21, “A Thematic Case Study: Border Crossings”

Chapter 23, “An Album of World Literature”

                        Discussion Thread (15pts)

                        Quiz on poems from Chapter 18 (20pts)

Week 7            Chapter 16, “A Study of Julia Alvarez: Five Poems”
Note especially “Sometimes the Words Are So Close”, along with comments by Alvarez, “On Writing ‘Sometimes the Words Are So Close". Following the poems are drafts of the poem.

Chapter 23, “A Collection of Contemporary Poems”

Chapter 26, “Critical Strategies for Reading”

Chapter 27, “Reading and the Writing Process””

                        Discussion Thread on Julia Alvarez (15pts)

                        DRAFT OF CRITICAL PAPER DUE by Saturday midnight (10pts)

 

Week 8:           Chapter 14, “A Study of Langston Hughes”

                        Discussion Thread on Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance (15pts)

                        FINAL DRAFT OF CRITICAL PAPER DUE  Saturday midnight (70­pts)

Proctored Final Essay Exam (60pts)

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: Students must participate in an academically related activity on a weekly basis in order to be marked present in an online class. Examples of academically-related activities include but are not limited to: contributing to an online discussion, completing a quiz or exam, completing an assignment, initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a courserelated question, or using any of the learning management system tools.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 96

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
1, 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Offers clearly stated personal and critical insights to interpretation of poem or poems. Makes adequate personal and critical statements, which are relevant and interpretive. Provides only plot summary, biographical information, or fails to retain focus on poem or poems. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Incorporates primary and secondary sources using MLA documentation style perceptively and creatively in ways that provide new insights into the poem or poems. Incorporates primary and secondary sources using MLA documentation style adequately without particularly fresh insights, but still retains personal voice. Primary and secondary sources used rarely if at all and without adequate MLA documentation. Insights are predictable. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1, 2, 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Provides convincing and innovative connections between texts through careful close reading of poem(s). Provides connections between texts that are obvious but nonetheless plausible and interesting. Connections between texts remain vague and undeveloped. Critique not supported by close readings. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Poetic and critical terminology applied skillfully throughout paper. Poetic and critical terminology used adequately throughout much of the paper. Rarely employs appropriate poetic and critical terminology, misuses it, or omits it altogether. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
2, 3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Skillfully interweaves passages from poem(s) and critical texts as well as strong personal statements that illustrate main point of essay. Adequately incorporates passages from poem(s) and passages from critical texts as well as some personal statements to prove thesis. Rarely provides specific passages from poem(s) or critical theory for analysis, or does so without making connections clear. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Employs conventions of Standard Written English with grace and style in a well organized, fully developed essay. Employs conventions of Standard Written English adequately in a reasonably well organized and developed essay. Writing shows persistent problems with the use of Standard Written English. Statements are often illogical, incomprehensible; organization and development of ideas do not support thesis. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 
Multicultural Component                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Outcomes
1, 2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Gracefully incorporates discussion of the work of one or more multicultural issue and shows relevance to theme of paper. Incorporates discussion of the work of at least one multicultural issue and provides relevant analysis. May mention work of a multicultural issue, but not in any meaningful way. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 
Provides links among a range of poetic texts                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Outcomes
1, 2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Analysis includes full discussion of a range of poetic texts. An attempt is made to include discussion of a range of texts. Paper does not address a range of texts. Does not submit assignment or does not respond appropriately to assignment. 

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Last Updated:7/19/2011 5:28:20 PM