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HIS 330 U.S. Military History
Watras, Kenneth A.


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

HIS 330 U.S. Military History

Semester

S1T 2012 DL

Faculty

Watras, Kenneth A.

Title

Adjunct Professor

Degrees/Certificates

M.A., Norwich University, Military History
M.A., Boston University, International Relations
B.A., Park University, History; Ohio State, Political Science

Office Location

Online

Office Hours

By appointment

Daytime Phone

623.935.6807 (Office)

Other Phone

623.694.1683 (Cell)

E-Mail

kenneth.watras@park.edu

Semester Dates

F2T 2011

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Chambers, John W. and G. Kurt Piehler. Ed. Major Problems in American Military
       History.
 Boston, MA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning, 1999. ISBN: 066933538X
Millett, Allan R. and Peter Maslowski. For the Common Defense: A Military History of the
      United States of America
. 2nd ed. New York: Free Press, 1994. ISBN: 0029215978
Articles:
 
 

WEEK 1

1. Title:  "The Militia of Colonial Massachusetts"

Author(s):  Jack S. Radabaugh

Source:  Military Affairs, Vol. 18, No. 1  (Spring, 1954), pp. 1-18

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/1982703

2. Title:  "Military Organisations and Military Change in Historical Perspective"

Author(s):  Jeremy Black

Source:  The Journal of Military History, Vol. 62, No. 4  (Oct., 1998), pp. 871-892

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/120181

WEEK 2

1. Title:  "Self-Governance and the American Citizen as Soldier, 1775-1861"

Author(s):  Ricardo A. Herrera

Source:  The Journal of Military History, Vol. 65, No. 1  (Jan., 2001), pp. 21-52

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/2677429

2. Title:  "The American Democratic Citizen Soldier: Triumph or Disaster?"

Author(s):  Peter Karsten

Source:  Military Affairs, Vol. 30, No. 1  (Spring, 1966), pp. 34-40

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/1985456

3. Title:  "Military Punishments in the War of 1812"

Author(s):  John S. Hare

Source:  The Journal of the American Military Institute, Vol. 4, No. 4  (Winter, 1940), pp. 225-239

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/3038685

WEEK 3

1. Title:  "Jomini and the Strategy of the American Civil War, A Reinterpretation"

Author(s):  Archer Jones

Source:  Military Affairs, Vol. 34, No. 4  (Dec., 1970), pp. 127-131

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/1986781

2. Title:  "A Study of Morale in Civil War Soldiers"

Author(s):  Pete Maslowski

Source:  Military Affairs, Vol. 34, No. 4  (Dec., 1970), pp. 122-126

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/1986780

3. Title:  "Drill, Training, and the Combat Performance of the Civil War Soldier: Dispelling the Myth of the Poor Soldier, Great Fighter"

Author(s):  Mark A. Weitz

Source:  The Journal of Military History, Vol. 62, No. 2  (Apr., 1998), pp. 263-289

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/120717

4. Title:  "Billy Yank and G. I. Joe: An Exploratory Essay on the Sociopolitical Dimensions of Soldier Motivation"

Author(s):  Thomas E. Rodgers

Source:  The Journal of Military History, Vol. 69, No. 1  (Jan., 2005), pp. 93-121

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/3397044

WEEK 4

1. Title:  "The United States Army as a National Police Force: The Federal Policing of Labor Disputes, 1877-1898"

Author(s):  Barton C. Hacker

Source:  Military Affairs, Vol. 33, No. 1  (Apr., 1969), pp. 255-264

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/1984485

2. Title:  "The American Military and the Principle of Civilian Control from McClellan to Powell"

Author(s):  Russell F. Weigley

Source:  The Journal of Military History, Vol. 57, No. 5, Special Issue: Proceedings of the Symposium on "The History of War as Part of General History" at the Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton, New Jersey  (Oct., 1993), pp. 27-58

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/2951800

Week 5

1. http://www.firstworldwar.com/origins/index.htm . Read Sir Michael Howard’s article: “World War One: The Crisis in European History--The Role of the Military Historian”
Author(s):  Michael Howard
Source:  The Journal of Military History, Vol. 57, No. 5, Special Issue: Proceedings of the Symposium on "The History of War as Part of General History" at the Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton, New Jersey  (Oct., 1993), pp. 127-138
Publisher(s): Society for Military History
Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/2951809

Week 6

1.     Title:  "Some Thoughts on World War II"
Author(s):  Gerhard L. Weinberg
Source:  The Journal of Military History, Vol. 56, No. 4  (Oct., 1992), pp. 659-668
Publisher(s): Society for Military History
Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/1986166

2.     Title:  "Franklin Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief In World War II"
Author(s):  William Emerson
Source:  Military Affairs, Vol. 22, No. 4  (Winter, 1958-1959), pp. 181-207
Publisher(s): Society for Military History
Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/1985429

3.     Title:  "Women in Uniform: The World War II Experiment"
Author(s):  D'Ann Campbell
Source:  Military Affairs, Vol. 51, No. 3, Fiftieth Year--1937-1987  (Jul., 1987), pp. 137-139
Publisher(s): Society for Military History
Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/1987516

4.     Title:  "The Power of Victory: Munitions Output in World War II"
Author(s):  Raymond W. Goldsmith
Source:  Military Affairs, Vol. 10, No. 1  (Spring, 1946), pp. 69-80
Publisher(s): Society for Military History
Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/1983105

5.     Title:  "American Military Psychiatry and Its Role among Ground Forces in World War II"
Author(s):  Paul Wanke
Source:  The Journal of Military History, Vol. 63, No. 1  (Jan., 1999), pp. 127-146
Publisher(s): Society for Military History
Stable URL:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/120336

Week 7

1. Title: "American Strategy in Vietnam: The Postwar Debate"

Author(s): George C. Herring

Source: Military Affairs, Vol. 46, No. 2 (Apr., 1982), pp. 57-63

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1988113

2. Title: "Toward a Better Understanding of Attrition: The Korean and Vietnam Wars"

Author(s): Carter Malkasian

Source: The Journal of Military History, Vol. 68, No. 3 (Jul., 2004), pp. 911-942

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3396732

Week 8

1. Title: "'An Inward Looking Time': The United States Army, 1973-1976"

Author(s): Richard Lock-Pullan

Source: The Journal of Military History, Vol. 67, No. 2 (Apr., 2003), pp. 483-511

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3093465

2. Title: "The "Long Pull" Army: NSC 68, the Korean War, and the Creation of the Cold War U.S. Army"

Author(s): David T. Fautua

Source: The Journal of Military History, Vol. 61, No. 1 (Jan., 1997), pp. 93-120

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2953916

3. Title: "The Duality of the American Military Tradition: A Commentary"

Author(s): Edward M. Coffman

Source: The Journal of Military History, Vol. 64, No. 4 (Oct., 2000), pp. 967-980

Publisher(s): Society for Military History Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2677263

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

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FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
HIS 330 U.S. Military History: This course is an overview of the U.S. military experience from pre-Revolutionary to the present with a focus on how the nation thinks about, prepares for, and conducts warfare. The course will examine the interaction of the military, cultural, social, institutional, and international factors that have shaped U.S. military history. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
Course material is presented using various methods including lectures, required readings and research, and discussions. Students are evaluated based on competency standards and demonstrated improvement in written assignments, discussion, and exams.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Interpret and analyze the “American way of war”
  2. Describe and compare American military models
  3. Analyze changing American military policies and goals
  4. Examine American military use of technology
  5. Analyze American relationship with, preparation for, and application of war


Core Assessment:

Core Assessment Grading Rubric: Due at the end of Week 6

Abstract (10 points): The abstract should be 40-60 words in length.

Thesis Statement (10 points): introduction with clear thesis statement

Your Analysis (50 points):

1. America’s paradoxical love-hate relationship with war

2. How this relationship influences American warfare

Conclusion (10 points): conclusion paragraph that reiterates key points

Writing Mechanics (20 points):

Grammar, Punctuation & Spelling, Length, Paper format, Chicago Style OR MLA Style for non-History Majors

Communication Skills covered by these "writing mechanics" are part of the class rubric - see the course syllabus. This is also important to the discipline of History so that you can clearly convey your ideas to your reader. Keep in mind, however, that the large majority of the paper's point value (80%)  is based on the content.

Total Possible: 100 points

Link to Class Rubric

Grading:


Weekly Discussions
: Weekly discussions involve responding to two of three questions based upon the readings and responding to two classmates. Discussion posts are to be thorough and thoughtful - and are to be mostly your critical thinking and analysis and not largely borrowed materials. Please do reference the course readings (and only the course readings) but only enough to support your argument. Appropriate documentation is required for references. You choose two of three possible discussion questions each week. For each question, you will post an initial discussion of 200 words by Wednesday and a response post of 50 words to another student’s initial post by Sunday. Each initial discussion is worth from 1 to 3 points; each response to a classmate is worth 1 or 2 points, for a total of 10 points per week and a total of 80 points for the term. The Discussion Rubric is below:

Initial Post

Response Post

3 points: Post contains exceptional critical thinking and analysis which answers the question, integrates the discussion into the broader scope of the course, and properly synthesizes course materials for support.  Post has no errors in grammar and punctuation.  Post is the required length.

Not applicable

2 points: Analysis answers the question.  Post contains very few errors in grammar and punctuation.  Post is as much as 50 words below required length.

2 points: Response contains exceptional critical thinking and analysis which addresses the initial post, integrates the discussion into the broader scope of the course, and synthesizes course materials for support.  Response has no errors in grammar and punctuation.  Response is the required length.

1 point: Post only partially answers the question and contains numerous errors in grammar and punctuation.  Post is as much as 100 words short of required length.

1 point: Response only partially addresses the initial post and contains errors in grammar and punctuation. Response is as much as 20 words short of required length.

Week 6 Core Assessment:
The final paragraph from For the Common Defense Introduction (xiv) says:

“Americans have had a peculiar ambivalence toward war.  They have traditionally and sincerely viewed themselves as a peaceful, unmilitaristic people, and yet they have hardly been unwarlike.  Statistics alone testify to the pervasive presence of war in the nation’s history, for tens of millions of Americans have served in wartime and more than a million have died in uniform.  Understanding both this paradoxical love-hate attitude toward war and the relationship among military institutions, war, and society is essential in comprehending America’s past, its present, and, perhaps, its future.”
CLOs:
  • Interpret and analyze the “American way of war”
  • Describe and compare American military models
  • Analyze changing American military policies and goals
  • Examine American military use of technology
  • Analyze American relationship with, preparation for, and application of war

Use each of the five Core Learning Outcomes to address the issues highlighted in the final introductory paragraph of For the Common Defense. What evidence from our readings suggests that Americans consider themselves essentially peaceful?  What evidence shows Americans as warlike?  Explain this "paradoxical love-hate attitude toward war" and how this relationship is reflected in America’s military history.  Finally, why is understanding this important?
This analytical essay should be:

  • Double-spaced, font size of 10-12, Times New Roman.
  • Footnotes and Bibliography in Chicago Style for history majors; for non-history majors, parenthetical citations & Works Cited in MLA or parenthetical citations & References in APA style.
  • Use margins of one-inch on all four sides
  • Contain a proper page header with numbered pages.
  • Length: 1,000 to 1,500 words (approximately 4 to 6 pages).
  • Include an abstract of 40-60 words.
  • Include an introduction paragraph with a clear statement of thesis or purpose, and a conclusion paragraph that reiterates your key points.
  • Be placed as a MS Word or Rich Text format (RTF) document by midnight on Sunday of week 6.

Papers will be evaluated for both content (evidence and argument) and style of presentation. Proofread, Proofread, Proofread!   



Core Assessment Grading Rubric: Due at the end of Week 6

Abstract (10 points): The abstract should be 40-60 words in length.

Thesis Statement (10 points): introduction with clear thesis statement

Your Analysis (50 points):

1. America’s "paradoxical love-hate relationship with war"

2. How this relationship influences American war

Conclusion (10 points): conclusion paragraph that reiterates key points

Writing Mechanics (20 points):

Grammar, Punctuation & Spelling, Length, Paper format, Chicago Style OR MLA Style for non-History Majors

Communication Skills covered by these "writing mechanics" are part of the class rubric - see the course syllabus. This is also important to the discipline of History so that you can clearly convey your ideas to your reader. Keep in mind, however, that the large majority of the paper's point value (80%) is based on the content.

Total Possible: 100 points

Midterm Exam: The midterm exam will be administered online during week 4 and will be worth 40 points.  This exam will cover materials from weeks 1, 2, 3, and 4.  It will include short answer questions.  The exam is open book; however, you will only have a 1-hour time limit.  You can only make up a missed midterm if I receive notice ahead of time that you need an extension.

Proctored Final Exam
: The proctored final exam is a comprehensive, 2-hour, closed-note, closed-book exam worth 100 points. It  includes short answer questions. This exam covers material from Weeks 1-8. For proctored examinations, photo identification is required at the time of the test. You will also need to check with your proctor to see if they will need for you to bring paper to the exam since this is a short answer and essay exam. Guidelines for selecting an acceptable proctor can be found on the Park University Website.

Grading Philosophy:
A is exceptional and an uncommon achievement.
B is above the average in fulfillment of course standard.
C is average fulfillments of course standards.
D is below average and marginally meets the course standard.
F is obviously failing to meet the course standard.

Grading:

Course Grading Scale: These points are non-negotiable.  In other words, 314 points is a B, not an A.
A = 90 - 100% (or 315 to 350 points)
B = 80 - 89% (or 280 to 314 points)
C = 70 - 79% (or 245 to 279 points)
D = 60 - 69% (or 210 to 244 points)
F = < 60% (209 or fewer points)

Late Submission of Course Materials:
All work is due on the due date unless students make prior arrangements.  If you need an extension, contact the instructor before the requirement's due date via e-mail or phone, explain the circumstances, and request an extension. You may be required to document your problem or emergency. Course requirements submitted after the deadline without an extension may incur a late penalty.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

The fundamental objective of this course is to learn. That means we must all work together and learn from each other. In order to accomplish this, we must treat each other with respect. Everyone will have the opportunity and freedom to express their ideas. Be sure to review the Park Student Code of Conduct.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

Brief Course Schedule:

Weeks

     Topics

     Assignments

·         See each weekly unit home page for more specific discussion of weekly assignments and topics.

·         All assignments and exams are due by midnight (Central) on Sunday of the week in which they are assigned.

Week 1

·        American military history

·        Colonial warfare

  • Lecture
  • Readings
    • Major Problems, ch. 1, 2
    • Common Defense, ch. 1, 2
    • Linn and Weigley article
    • Radabaugh article
    • Black article
    • Sheffer excerpt of Chambers
  • Discussions

 

Week 2

·        The Revolutionary Era

·        Preserving Independence

·        Military expansion to the Civil War

  • Lecture
  • Readings:
    • Major Problems, ch. 3, 4, 5
    • Common Defense, ch. 3, 4, 5
    • Herrera article
    • Karsten article
    • Hare article
  • Discussions
  • Paper 1 

Week 3

·        The Civil War era

·        The American Way of War

  • Lecture
  • Readings:
    • Major Problems, ch. 6, 7
    • Common Defense, ch. 6, 7
    • Jones article
    • Maslowski article
    • Weitz article
    • Rodgers article
  • Discussions
  • Paper 2

Week 4

·        Post-Civil War America

·        Birth of an Empire

·        World Power status

  • Readings:
    • Major Problems, ch. 8
    • Common Defense, ch. 8, 9, 10
    • Hacker article
    • Weigley article
  • Discussions
  • Midterm Exam

Week 5

·        World War I

·        Inter-war years

Week 6

·        World War II

  • Readings:
    • Major Problems, chs. 11, 12
    • Common Defense, chs. 13, 14
  • Two of the following articles:
    • Weinberg article
    • Emerson article
    • Campbell article
    • Goldsmith article
    • Wanke article
  • Discussions
  • Core Assessment Essay (Includes Abstract) 

Week 7

·        Post-World War II

·        The Cold War

·        Korea

·        Vietnam

  • Readings:
    • Major Problems, ch. 13, 14
    • Common Defense, ch. 15, 16,17
    • Herring article
    • Malkasian article
  • Discussions
  • Brief paper

Week 8

·        Cold War

·        1993 Gulf War

  • Readings:
    • Major Problems, ch. 15
    • Common Defense, ch. 18, Epilogue
    • Lock-Pullan article
    • Fautua article
    • Coffman article
  • Discussions
  • Proctored Final Exam

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: Students must participate in an academically related activity on a weekly basis in order to be marked present in an online class. Examples of academically-related activities include but are not limited to: contributing to an online discussion, completing a quiz or exam, completing an assignment, initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a courserelated question, or using any of the learning management system tools.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 96

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation and synthesize information from sources                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Outcomes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Superior selection of source information to answer the question



 
Adequate selection of source information to answer the question Inadequate selection of source information to answer the question  
Content of Communication: grammar/punctuation/spelling/typing/sentence structures/readability/paragraphing                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
Park Mission Statement: communicate effectively                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
0 errors in grammar/punctuation/spelling/typing/sentence structures/documentation.  Superior organization and readability.  Superior thesis with support. 1 to 3 errors in grammar/punctuation/spelling/typing/sentence structures/documentation.  Adequate organization and  readability.  Adequate thesis with support. 4 to 6 errors in grammar/punctuation/spelling/typing/sentence structures/documentation.  Inadequate organization and readability.  Inadequate thesis and support.  
Community and Civic Responsibility                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Outcomes
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Superior analysis of community and civic responsibility as applied to two military models Adequate analysis of community and civic responsibility as applied to two military models Inadequate analysis of community and civic responsibility as applied to two military models  

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Last Updated:12/29/2011 10:11:41 AM