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ED 595 Play in Early Child Curriculum
Choi, Dong Hwa


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

ED 595 Play in Early Child Curriculum

Semester

F2P 2011 DL

Faculty

Choi, Dong Hwa

Title

Associate Professor

Degrees/Certificates

Ph.D. Early Childhood Education and Urban Leadership & Policy Studies in Education
M.A.  Educational Psychology
B.S. Elementary School Education

Office Location

911 Main, Suite 819 Kansas City, MO 64105

Office Hours

Monday 12-5 pm: Additional office hours are available by appointment. available 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. M-Sat by cell phone

Daytime Phone

816-559-5604

Other Phone

816-820-7950

E-Mail

dong.choi@park.edu

Semester Dates

Oct 17-Dec11

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 

Rogers, S. (2011). Rethinking play and pedagogy in early childhood education: Concepts, contexts, and cultures. Routledge. ISBN: 978-0-415-48076-5

D. P. Fromberg & D. Bergen (2006). Play from birth to twelve and beyond: Contexts, perspectives, and meanings. 2nd Ed. Routledge ISBN: 0-415-95112-7

Additional Resources:

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Course Description:
ED595 Play in the Early Childhood Curriculum: This course offers an in-depth exploration of play as an integral component of early learning. Emphasis is placed on the roles of the teacher in observing play, developing and refining teaching strategies that support and extend childrens play, and advocating for play in the early childhood curriculum.

Educational Philosophy:
Developing as a teacher is a complex process that occurs most effectively in learning communities that provide rich opportunities for inquiry and reflection, and that cultivate a sense of curiosity, integrity, social justice, and professionalism.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Conduct in-depth studies of play in early childhood settings.
  2. Analyze the contributions of play to children's development.
  3. Examine and apply various analytical models for understanding the complexity of play.
  4. Develop strategies for effectively observing, supporting, and extending children's play.
  5. Communicate a child's progress to families.
  6. Critically review issues related to the influence of popular culture and violence in play.
  7. Advocate for the central role of play in the early childhood curriculum.


Core Assessment:

Class Assessment:
 

COURSE ASSESSMENTS


I. Class Discussion (20pts x 8wks=160pts) :

The purpose of the Class Discussion  is to develop critical thinking abilities to promote students’ teaching practices. (NAEYC Standards 1, 3, 4, 5; Professional Tools 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8).

II. Weekly Reflection ( 20pts x 8 wks=160 pts)

The purpose of the weekly reflection is to encourage a synthesis of the thinking of various authors and to promote a reflective stance on the part of the reader. Readings should be specifically referenced with a well-developed discussion of the provocations the authors are providing to your own thinking. Journals should be submitted weekly for a total of five entries for the session. (NAEYC Standards 1, 3, 4, 5; Professional Tools 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8).

III. Core Assignment Part A—Case Study(35pts x 3 times =105 pts)

If you are a PreK and Kindergarten Classroom Teacher, complete the following assignment.
Case Study: Conduct case studies of a child(ren)’s play. Your study should include videotapes or anecdotal records of the play with an analysis of each session, including a discussion of the contributions of the play situation to the child’s development and learning. The purpose of the case study is to understand how children’s play contributes to their developments. Analyzing children’s play behaviors by videotaping will lead teachers to investigate how children set up their theories and strategies, and solve problems in a play situation. By analyzing children’s play behaviors, and their interaction with peers and teachers in a play situation, you will learn roles and dynamics of children’s play which contributes to their development. Also, the microanalysis will provide an opportunity for teachers to examine their scaffolding strategies and to investigate ways of providing effective scaffolding for maximizing children’s learning through play.

  1. Videotape a child(ren)’s play behavior(s) and teacher(s)’ scaffolding strategies or interactions with the child(ren) about 2-3 minutes. You can videotape your interaction or scaffolding with children or other teachers’ interaction or scaffolding with children. Either case is fine.
  1. Analyze your video clip as follows.

a.       Analyze the child(ren)’s behaviors in terms of their own theories, reasoning, problem-solving strategies, social skills, peer relationships, feelings, fine or gross motor skills, or play types. Do not miss any subtle verbal or non-verbal behaviors videotaped. In order to analyze the children’s behaviors, watch the video clip repeatedly. Discuss the following questions: Why do(es) the child(ren) demonstrate(s) the behaviors in the play situation? What makes the child(ren) behave that way? Do(es) the child(ren) fully understand an operating logic of a certain toy or play material? Do(es) the child(ren) fully understand what the teacher asks to do? Do(es) the child(ren) consider others’ point of views? Of course, you can analyze your child(ren)’s behavior(s) from your own perspectives by asking other questions that are not listed above.

b.      Analyze the teachers’ scaffolding strategies in the play situation. Watch the video clip repeatedly. Find out the teacher(s)’ scaffolding strategies, the teachers’ assumptions of the children’s logics, social skills, reasoning, feelings, or physical abilities. Also, analyze teacher(s)’verbal or non-verbal interaction with the child(ren). Discuss the following questions: Why does the teacher use a particular scaffolding strategy? What does the teacher encourage the child to achieve in that play situation? What is the teacher’s reasoning in the play situation?

c.       Evaluate the child(ren)’s learning in the play situation. After you analyze the play scene, evaluate what the child(ren) learn(s). How does the play episode contribute to the child(ren)’s development in what aspects? How does this play episode facilitate children’s problem-solving abilities? How does this play episode facilitate the child(ren)’s learning according to Piaget’s classification of knowledge (i.e., physical knowledge, logical-mathematical knowledge, and social knowledge)? Can you observe the child(ren)’s learning processes in terms of Piaget’s theory (i.e., assimilation, accommodation, cognitive conflicts, and equilibrium)?

d.      Evaluate the teachers’ scaffolding strategies in terms of effectiveness. Does the teacher use appropriate scaffolding strategies in the play situation and why? Does the teacher over-direct or misdirect the child(ren)’s play episode and why? How could you use different strategies in the play situation and why? How does the teacher’s scaffolding contribute to children’s development in what aspects? Does the teacher understand the child(ren)’s previous learning experience and understanding level? Does this teacher collaboratively construct ZPD with the child(ren)?

*** Discuss the four parts of the assignment in details. Microanalysis of children’s behavior and teachers’ scaffolding strategies in details will give you ideas how children’s play can contribute to their learning. Do NOT discuss children’s learning without pointing out the actual contents of your video clip. That means that your discussion of children’s behaviors and teachers’ scaffolding should be discussed based upon your observation. General assumptions of how children’s play contributes to their development without discussing the detailed information of analysis of children’s behaviors does not provide any insight to us. 

 (NAEYC Standards 1, 3, 4, 5; Professional Tools 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)

If you are a Primary Classroom Teacher, complete the same assignment that is described for preK and Kindergarten teachers with an emphasis of creating play situation for children. Thus, complete the four part of the assignment and explain how the play time which is the “unofficial” world in primary grades was created or initiated by you or your children. (NAEYC Standards 1, 3, 4, 5; Professional Tools 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)

IV. Core Assessment Part B--Advocacy Plan (30 pts)

1.                  After you analyze children’s play behaviors and teachers’ scaffolding strategies, what do you learn about children’s play? Do you believe that children’s play contributes to their development, and in what aspects, and why?

2.                  Describe how your school, school principal, school district, and parents view children’s play as a curriculum or children’s learning processes. While professional policy statements promote play as the centerpiece of the early childhood curriculum, opportunities for child-initiated play are being compromised by an increasingly academic focus for many children in publicly funded PreK programs, and relegated to the peripheries of the daily life of the kindergarten classroom. For example, NCLB or standard-based learning curriculum may affect your classroom to integrate children’s play into children’s learning processes. Based upon your learnings and the needs of your teaching community, develop a strategy for taking a leadership role in advocating for play and/or teacher research about play in children’s learning. This project may include but not be limited to

·         A plan for a presentation/workshop for families, coworkers

·         A plan for a well-developed strategy for working with administrators.

Discuss what contents, message, and plan you would deliver to children’s families, coworkers, or school administrators. Your plan should be presented in the form of a detailed plan including rationale and strategies. (2-3 pages, double space, 12 font letter)

** APA style, 2-3 references

V. Final Test : 45 pts

Grading:
 

Total point :500 pts

A=100-90%

B=89-80%

C=79-70%

Late Submission of Course Materials:
 

·   All assignments should be typed. No handwritten assignment will be accepted.

·   All assignments must be turned in on the dates indicated, unless date is changed by instructor.

·   Each assignment has point deductions. See the rubric for each assignment.

·   Any absence does not excuse students’ responsibility to get assignments turned in on or before due day.

·   Extreme emergency absences and/or due date situation will be handled case by case at the instructor’s discretion. Instructor’s decision is final. Keep instructor informed of any potential personal situations that might necessitate an absence. 

·   I reserve the right and responsibility to evaluate the quality of your work. Completion of an assignment does not guarantee the awarding of all possible points.

·   For your own protection, always save a copy of any assignment you complete.

 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

Week1: Teacher Researchers I

 Class Discussion

Read the chapter assigned for this week and answer two questions which are raised by the instructor.

 Chapter 1: Play and pedagogy: A conflict of interests? by Sue Rogers

Dues

Original post: Wednesday, Midnight CST

Responses to classmates: Sunday, Midnight CST

Weekly Reflection

Select two chapters from the chapters listed and complete the form given for the weekly reflection.

Due: Sunday, Midnight CST

Chapter 1: Play development from birth to age four

Chapter 2: Play development from ages four to eight

Chapter 3: Play development from ages eight to twelve

Week 2 : Teacher Researchers II

 Class Discussion  

Read the chapter assigned for this week and answer two questions which are raised by the instructor.

Dues

Original post: Wednesday, Midnight CST

Responses to classmates: Sunday, Midnight CST

 Chapter 3: The challenge of play for early childhood educators by Sue Dockett

Weekly Reflection

Select two chapters from the chapters listed and complete the form given for the weekly reflection.

Due: Sunday, Midnight CST

Chapter 9: Social and nonsocial play 

Chapter 10: Sociodramatic play pretending together 

Chapter 11: Constructive play 

Week 3 Historical and cultural contexts of play

 Class Discussion  

Read the chapter assigned for this week and answer two questions which are raised by the instructor.

Dues

Original post: Wednesday, Midnight CST

Responses to classmates: Sunday, Midnight CST

Chapter 6: Exploring culture, play, and early childhood education practice in African contexts   by Kofi Marfo and Linda Biersteker

Weekly Reflection

Select two chapters from the chapters listed and complete the form given for the weekly reflection.

Due: Sunday, Midnight CST

Chapter 26: Play in historical and cross-cultural contexts

Chapter 27: Influences of race, cultures, social class, and gender: Diversity and play

Chapter 28: Parent-child and child-child play in diverse cultural contexts

Chapter 29: Can I play too? Reflections on the issues for children with disabilities

Core assignment #1

Upload your video clip with a brief explanation in this section.

Drop off your core assignment paper #1 in the drop box of week 3.

Dues

Video Clip: Thursday, Midnight CST

Case Study Paper: Sunday, Midnight CST

Week 4: Social contexts of play in US settings

 Class Discussion  

Read the chapter assigned for this week and answer two questions which are raised by the instructor.

Dues

Original post: Wednesday, Midnight CST

Responses to classmates: Sunday, Midnight CST

Chapter 5: Revisiting Vygotskian perspectives on play and pedagogy by Elena Bodrova and Deborah J. Leong

 Weekly Reflection

Select two chapters from the chapters listed and complete the form given for the weekly reflection.

Due: Sunday, Midnight CST

Chapter 32: City play

Chapter 33: Children’s outdoor play: An endangered activity

Chapter 34: Perspectives on play and playgrounds

Chapter 36: Clinical perspectives on play

Week 5: Theories and categories of play

 Class Discussion

Read the chapter assigned for this week and answer two questions which are raised by the instructor.

Dues

Original post: Wednesday, Midnight CST

Responses to classmates: Sunday, Midnight CST

Chapter 4: We are hunters and gathers of values: Dramatic play, early childhood pedagogy, and the formation of ethical identities by Brian Edmiston

Weekly Reflection

Select two chapters from the chapters listed and complete the form given for the weekly reflection.

Due: Sunday, Midnight CST

Chapter 12: Rough-and-tumble play from childhood through adolescence: Differing perspectives 

Chapter 13: Games with rules 

Chapter 3: Play as children see it

Core assignment #2

Upload your video clip with a brief explanation in this section.

Drop off your core assignment paper #2 in the drop box of week 5.

Dues

Video Clip: Thursday, Midnight CST

Case Study Paper: Sunday, Midnight CST

Week 6: Play and the ECE curriculum

 Discuss thread

Read the chapter assigned for this week and answer two questions which are raised by the instructor.

 Dues

Original post: Wednesday, Midnight CST

Responses to classmates: Sunday, Midnight CST

 Chapter 10: Deconstructing the metaphysics of play theories : Toward a pedagogy of play aesthetics by Hae-Ryung Yeu

Weekly Reflection

Select two chapters from the chapters listed and complete the form given for the weekly reflection.

Due: Sunday, Midnight CST

Chapter 17: Adults influences on play: The Vygotskian approach

Chapter 18: Social play in school

Chapter 20: Play and mathematics at ages one to ten

Week 7: Play and Literacy Development

Class Discussion

Read the chapter assigned for this week and answer two questions which are raised by the instructor.

Dues

Original post: Wednesday, Midnight CST

Responses to classmates: Sunday, Midnight CST

Chapter 11: Digital play in the classroom: A twenty-first century pedagogy? by Tim Waller

Weekly Reflection

Select two chapters from the chapters listed and complete the form given for the weekly reflection.

Due: Sunday, Midnight CST

Chapter 4: Language and play: Natural partners

Chapter 19: Play as a medium for literacy development

Chapter 21: Scientific inquiry and exploratory representational play

Core assignment # 3

Upload your video clip with a brief explanation in this section.

Drop off your core assignment paper #3 in the drop box of week 7.

Dues

Video Clip: Thursday, Midnight CST

Case Study Paper: Sunday, Midnight CST

Week 8: Issues in Contemporary US society

 Class Discussion  

Read the chapter assigned for this week and answer two questions which are raised by the instructor.

Dues

Original post: Wednesday, Midnight CST

Responses to classmates: Sunday, Midnight CST

 Chapter 8: Learning through play in Hong Kong by Doris Cheung Pui-Wah

Weekly Reflection

Select two chapters from the chapters listed and complete the form given for the weekly reflection.

Due: Sunday, Midnight CST

Chapter 38: Sociocultural influences on gender-role behaviors in children’s play

Chapter 39: Play and violence: Understanding and responding effectively

Chapter 40: Attaining the protean self in a rapidly changing world: Understanding chaos through play

Advocacy paper

Drop the paper in the drop box in week 8.

Due: Sunday, Midnight CST

 

Final test


Academic Honesty:
As a learning community, the University upholds the highest standards of academic integrity in all its academic activities, by faculty, staff, administrators and students. Academic integrity involves much more than respecting intellectual property rights. It lies at the heart of learning, creativity, and the core values of the University. Those who learn, teach, write, publish, present, or exhibit creative works are advised to familiarize themselves with the requirements of academic integrity and make every effort to avoid possible offenses against it, knowingly or unknowingly. Park University 2011-2012 Graduate Catalog Page 21

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism is the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct.  Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2011-2012 Graduate Catalog Page 21


Attendance Policy:

Students must participate in an academically related activity on a weekly basis in order to be marked present in an online class. Examples of academically-related activities include but are not limited to: contributing to an online discussion, completing a quiz or exam, completing an assignment, initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a courserelated question, or using any of the learning management system tools.Park University 2011-2012 Graduate Catalog Page 25

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

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Last Updated:10/10/2011 11:41:21 PM