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PS 205 Child Psychology
Hovland, David


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

PS 205 Child Psychology

Semester

S1T 2012 DLA

Faculty

Hovland, David

Title

Senior Professor - Now Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

B.A. YALE UNIVERSITY - Culture & Behavior (Honors Interdisciplinary Major
M.A. HARVARD UNIVERSITY - PSYCHOLOGY
Ph.D. HARVARD UNIVERSITY - PSYCHOLOGY

Office Location

The Forked Brook Farm Library - Petersburgh, New York

Office Hours

Monday through Friday 2:00-3:00 p.m. and by appointment.

Daytime Phone

518-658-3699

E-Mail

David.Hovland@Park.edu

david.hovland@gmail.com

Semester Dates

January 16 - March 11, 2012

Class Days

ONLINE

Class Time

I will go ONLINE at least every other day - Early afternoon & evening

Prerequisites

PS101 (Introduction to Psychology)

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Discovering Child Development, 2nd Edition

Authors: Martin & Fabes
ISBN-10: 0-547-00361-7
ISBN-13: 978-0-547-00361-0
Publisher: Wadsworth/Centage learning
Publication Date: 2009
Additional Resources:
APA Style Manual

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

The McAfee Memorial Library is very valuable.
 
Some websites for American Psychological Association style (especially for CITATIONS):
 
Two "OWL" sites - one is administered by Purdue University and provides many examples.  The other is administered by Park University and is valuable for a set of varied examples in which students will not get "bogged down".  (OWL is Online Writing Laboratory.)
 
For citations, the best current examples are on "Son of Citation Machine ..."

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
PS 205 Child Psychology (ED 205) A study of biological, cognitive, and sociocultural development from the prenatal period through childhood. Attention will be given to theory and research, practical examples and policy implications. Prerequisite PS 101. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
     I do believe in "interactiveness."  I think 'disputatious' is a bit strong for my personal ideal.

     My undergraduate major ("Culture and Behavior") was an exceptional one - Five faculty members were present at each meeting of the weekly seminar, which had about 50 meetings - usually 13 per term for Fall of Junior Year, Spring of Junior Year, Fall of Senior Year, Spring of Senior Year. The faculty at these meetings were: an anthropologist, a psychologist, a sociologist, a zoologist, and a 'guest lecturer.'  There were eight students in the major each year, so the ratio was 5:8 ... not 1:40 (or even 1:350 at some places.)  It gave us lots of 'cross-cultural perspective, which is increasingly seen as important in Child Psychology.  
     I tell you this in advance to reassure you that none of you will be scored or evaluation on anthropological or zoological facts or theories - We may 'air some ideas', but will stick to the test on grading matters!

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Utilize the vocabulary of child psychology.
  2. Critically examine the principles of biological, cognitive and socio-cultural development.
  3. Explain the theoretical principles of child psychology.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of research method used to study children.
  5. Gather, evaluate, and communicate information effectively.
  6. Demonstrate high quality written and oral communication skills through interaction with other students and the instructor in a structured, flexible environment.
  7. Identify the effect public policy has on children.


Core Assessment:
·        Research Paper (Core Assessment).  Each student will write one research paper. Each student will conduct four 3 hour observations with children in various stages of their development. There will be three additional topic areas that each student will need to address. First the student will need to address prenatal development and birth. Secondly each student will need to address how public policy affects each period of development and finally they will need to examine different cultural influences during each developmental period. The following table will show what stages will be required:

Topic Area

Data Collection

Minimum Duration of Observation/Interview

Prenatal Development and Birth

Literature Review

NA

The First 2 Years

Observation

3 Hours

The Play Years

Observation

3 Hours

The School Years

Observation

3 Hours

Adolescence

Observation

3 Hours

Public Policy – Child Development

Literature Review

NA

Views of Child Development in different cultures.

Literature Review

NA

The observation can occur in any setting where children can be found. Each student needs to make an arguable claim (thesis statement) that will be the central theme of this research paper. They will then use the observations, class discussions, and literature as evidence to support their arguable claim. Each student will have to focus on the five different developmental periods, public policy, and cultural influences on development as they apply to their arguable claim. The 3 hours used for the observations need to be recorded in a student developed observation sheet. Each paper will need to have the completed observation sheets attached as an appendix. The paper will need to be double spaced. The paper will need to use APA style when citing references and will need an APA style references list. The paper will need to have 7 references including the textbook. 3 of the 7 references will need to be empirically based research reports from a refereed professional journal. The student will need to synthesize, analyze, and evaluate these observations and the literature that they have cited. They will propose a plausible developmental research question based on their observations. They will then suggest a possible developmental research design that they could use to investigate the research question and discuss why that design was selected. The research questions and design section needs to be a small part of the paper and does not need to be the central theme of the paper. It needs to be a seamless part of the paper and not a separate section.    The paper will be worth up to 300 points.  To see what is required and how the points will be distributed, see the rubric below and the Core Assessment Rubric at the end. See the graphic below for a list of paper requirements.

 

 

Research Paper Requirements

 

Differences and similarities between the 7 topic areas are outlined in comparison with the literature.

7 or more references are used from the literature. These references provide evidence from the literature on the topic being examined. Three of the references are empirical reports from a scientific journal.

Each paper consistently uses developmental terms appropriately with less than 5 errors.

The research paper contains the following sections: APA citations, Introduction, Analysis, Conclusion, and APA formatted references page. 

 

A student created graph (not a copy of someone else’s graph) is included to make a point to arguer for your arguable claim.

The student develops a plausible research question that is a natural extension of the literature reviewed in the paper. This does not have to be the major theme of the paper, but should be included seamlessly in the paper.

The research paper will also include the following: Focus (arguable claim, original idea, & clear controlling idea), Development (full discussion, smooth style, & personal experiences), Organization (smooth transitions, clear paragraphing, & logical sequence of topics), Mechanics (proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling).

The research paper identified cultural variations found in adult development in relation to the first four topic areas.

The research paper identified public policy issues that affect the first four topic areas.

 

 

PS205-Core Assessment Rubric

 

Competency

Exceeds Expectation                    (2)

Meets Expectation                   (1)

Does Not Meet Expectation (0)

Critical Thinking

 

 

 

Analysis & Evaluation          Outcomes - 1, 2, 5

Compared and contrasted 5-6 topic areas and corresponding literature. 9 or more references from the literature. The student cited references that provide evidence from the literature on the topic being examined in the research paper. Three of the references should be empirical and refereed research articles.

Compared and contrasted 3-4 topic areas and corresponding literature. 7-9 references from the literature. The student cited references that provide evidence from the literature on the topic being examined in the research paper. Three of the references should be empirical and refereed research articles

Compared and contrasted 1-2 topic areas and corresponding literature. 1-4 reference(s) from the literature. The student cited references that provide evidence from the literature on the topic being examined in the research paper.

Content

 

 

 

Application          Outcomes - 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Research paper identified public policy issues and culture variations in views of adult development in the first 4 topic areas.

Research paper identified public policy issues and culture variations in views of adult development in 2-3 of the first 4 topic areas.

Research paper identified public policy issues and culture variations in views of adult development in one of the first 4 topic areas.

Technical Skills

 

 

 

Whole Artifact          Outcome - 5

The research paper meets expectations while including a student developed graphic or table.

The research paper contains the following sections: APA citations, Introduction, Analysis, Conclusion, and APA formatted references page. The research paper will also include the following: Focus (arguable claim, original idea, & clear controlling idea), Development (full discussion, smooth style, & personal experiences), Organization (smooth transitions, clear paragraphing, & logical sequence of topics), Mechanics (proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling).

 

The research paper contains the following sections: Cover page, Abstract – summary of Project, Introduction, Analysis, Conclusion, APA formatted references page.

 

 

 

 

Class Assessment:
The exam is fairly heavily 'weighted' and students MUST arrange a PROCTORED EXAM. You may not take exams on your own computer.  Only under circumstances which the student explains, will a QUIZ be granted an exception - i.e. a permission to take it after the due date.


The sum of all points available in the course is   470, divided as follows (bold if many pts.)
Discussions - Eight discussions, one each week     80  points total for Discussions
Final Exam - One session near end of the course 100  points
Midterm Test - One session in mid-course    50  points
Powerpoint Presentation - One time toward end    20  points
Quizzes - Six quizzes (20 points each)                   120 points
Research Paper #1 (mid-course, good practice)     50 points
Research Paper #2 (toward end)                             50 points

                                                  (checking total ..   470 points - correct !)


Grading:

The full "rubric" was not certainly "set in stone."  But now there is a good guideline (above) for the "Core Assessment" (in our PS 205 course essentially a "term paper."  APA style must be used, and there are requirements about length and number of citations.  Follow these!

Notice that for several considerations, there are categories of "Exceeds Expectation", "Meets Expectation", "Does Not Meet Expectation" with some examples of what is considered (and what provides bases for judgment scores.)  Try to "Exceed Expectation" as often as possible to receive a high grade score.
The Core Assessment and the Final Exam are the 'big items' but FREQUENT GOOD INTERACTIONS WITH CLASSMATES AND THE TEACHER "mount up." 
 

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Late submissions will sometimes be accepted, but students must have some REASON for the lateness.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
"No biting, no fighting!" 


Be polite to your classmates and never ridicule them.  You could state a strong disagreement clear but "diplomatically."

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

The textbook (Discovering Child Development  2nd ed., by Martin, C. L. & Fabes, R.) provides a sequence of topics, with the exception that there will be some consideration of an "evolutionary" perspective in our very first week - i.e. we will begin by considering human beings in the context of 'The Animal Kingdom.'  There will also be discussion of different types of experimental designs (see Chapter 2 of Child Development.)

Then, there will be descriptions and questions about development, in a sequence which is often used in other textbooks as well - Infancy is the first phase considered, then 'the toddler stage', and then early childhood, followed by late childhood.  The book concludes with Social and Emotional Development in Adolescence (Chapter 16.)  It is worth noting that a different major sort or strategy of explanation enters in Chapter 6 - 'Cognitive and Language Development' differs in terms used and research done compared to the biological and 'physical development & health' used in Chapters 3 through 5.

We will consider behavioral development, with attention to what can be expected at different ages.

We will discuss cultural differences.

We will describe, and attempt to account for, abnormalities in children.

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93
Each student should be able to say "On my honor as a 'gentleperson', I have neither given nor received aid on this assignment - for all assignments.

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 93
PLAGIARISM IS TAKEN VERY SERIOUSLY IN ACADEMIC SETTINGS - NEVER DO IT!

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: Students must participate in an academically related activity on a weekly basis in order to be marked present in an online class. Examples of academically-related activities include but are not limited to: contributing to an online discussion, completing a quiz or exam, completing an assignment, initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a courserelated question, or using any of the learning management system tools.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 96
Please try hard to take part in all discussions!

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:




Bibliography:

Copyright:

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Last Updated:1/2/2012 4:08:38 PM