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EDE 378 Science for ECE & Elem Tchrs
Benjamin, Michele J


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

EDE 378 Science for ECE & Elem Tchrs

Semester

FA 2012 HO

Faculty

Benjamin, Michele J

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

Master of Science in Teaching Secondary Education/Biology
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration/Accounting

Office Hours

By appointment only

Daytime Phone

512-517-4837

E-Mail

michele.benjamin@park.edu

thebenjamins@kc.rr.com

Semester Dates

August 20-December 14

Class Days

-M-----

Class Time

10:00 - 11:30 AM

Prerequisites

EDE 359A and admission to the school of Education

Credit Hours

2


Textbook:

Martin, Ralph et al.  Teaching Science for All Children.  Fifth Edition ONLY.  Boston, MA:  Allyn an Bacon, 2009

Echapter download Chapter 3: The Processes of Science, Elementary Science Methods:  A Constructivist Approach, 6th edition- Author David Jerner Martin (to purchase echapter please go to http://www.cengagebrain.com/shop/isbn/9781111305437 )

E-Chapter download Chapters 1- An Invitation to Teaching Science and Chapter 8:  Explorations of Density, Science Stories, 5th edition- Author: Janice Koch  (to purchase echapter, please go to http://www.cengagebrain.com/shop/isbn/9781111833435 )

Please Note: All Park University School for Education candidates seeking a degree in Education (certification and non-certification tracks), must purchase Foliotek, the School for Education’s electronic portfolio system. As purchasing and accessing Foliotek is a multi-step process, please follow these instructions: 

1.      Decide the Contract Period and fee for which you will be paying. Minimally, you must purchase a contract which extends to the year you expect to graduate, however some students purchase a contract extending one year beyond graduation. 

 Contract Period    

 Contract Fee

Per Student (Prepaid)

Cost Breakdown

Per Student, Per Year

 1 year

 $30.00

$30.00

 2 years

 $59.00

$29.50

 3 years

 $87.00

$29.00

 4 years

 $112.00

$28.00

 5 years

$120.00

$24.00

6 years

$125.00

$20.83

2.      Send an email to Carol Williams (carol.williams@park.edu) with the following information:

a.      Your Name

b.      The Contract Period you wish to purchase

c.      Your student identification number

d.             Note: Students on a non-certification early childhood track, Teaching Young Children or Early Childhood and Leadership, need to request purchase of the NAEYC portfolio).

3.      Within a few days, you will receive from Foliotek an email with online purchasing information. Upon receipt of this email, purchase your Foliotek contract.

4.      Upon receipt of your payment, you will receive your login information. You must then send a final email to Carol Williams (carol.williams@park.edu), requesting she provide your current education professors and a academic advisor (list them) access to view your portfolio. It is imperative you complete this final step.

 




 


Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:
See additional PDF readings which will be accessible on E-companion.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
EDE378 Science for Early Childhood and Elementary Teachers: A course designed to explore how children develop an interest in scientific exploration. Students will observe, design,implement and evaluate activities appropriate for early childhood programs and elementary classroom. Prerequisites: EDE359 and admission to the School for Education. 2:0:2.

Educational Philosophy:
The instructor and the students will work together to establish a foundation for effective standards based inquiry science instruction.  This course will include experiences that engage the students through active learning.  Active learning is developed by acquiring knowledge, understanding thoughtful discussion, interactive examples of effective teaching, collaborative groups, portfolio development and reflective practice.  

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate confidence and understanding in the methods for teaching science
  2. Successfully construct, instruct, and evaluate diverse science lessons and/or units and include appropriate assessments
  3. Understand, demonstrate, and apply the science inquiry process in a variety of learning experiences.
  4. Creates vibrant and engaging learning environments when teaching and planning science instruction for the unifying concepts and process that are used in each of the science disciplines.
  5. Examine and evaluate resources available to assist the classroom teacher in science instruction
  6. Investigate resources available in the community that can be used as support to the classroom curriculum and develop a standard-specific lesson utilizing those resources


Core Assessment:
personal philosophy of teaching science

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

ALL ASSIGNMENTS ARE DUE in the DROPBOX BY 10am  the DAY OF CLASS.

If for any reason there is a problem submitting to the drop-box, I expect it in my email inbox by the same time:   michele.benjamin@park.edu

All written assignments must be typed in Times New Roman 12 font, double spaced, with 1 inch margins and checked for grammar and spelling errors.  Please proof-read your work- spell check alone is not sufficient.

All work must be the original work of the student. 

Late work will lose 20% of the grade value per day late.  (including late submission beyond 10am the day of class). 

All readings assigned must be completed before arriving to class.  Class discussions will revolve around details of the various readings.  Being unprepared for class will greatly affect your class participation grade.  

 

Assignment Descriptions:  

1.  Reflection Questions:  Each week there will be readings from the reading list and reflections questions that must be answered.  Only typed assignments will be accepted the day they are due. 

 2.  Science Philosophy Draft 1-  This is your personal philosophy of Science in the elementary classroom.  How do you see yourself teaching?  What does your classroom look like?  What role will science play in your planning for other disciplines?  During a science lesson in your class, what would a visitor see?  What do you want your students to walk away with?     This is to be a minimum of two, double spaced pages.  It is not a research-based document and citations are not necessary. 

 3.  Science Philosophy Draft 2-  This draft will be included in your Unit Plan final project.  This should reflect your NEW understandings of science instruction and build upon your first draft, now that you have taken this course.  What has changed about your thinking?  How can you improve upon your original philosophy?  Here you will cite your sources and refer to theories and practices we have learned about in our readings and in class.

 4.  Mini Lesson Plan and Presentation for Class-  Each student is responsible for using the Missouri Grade Level Expectations and Curriculum Frameworks to create a short (no more than 15 minutes) discrepant event/mini lesson they will present to the class.  The lesson must use the learning cycle format for inquiry.  Please have enough materials for each student in the class to complete the activity.  Use the lesson plan template to develop your lesson.  Create a handout sheet to distribute to the members of the class so they can successfully recreate the activity in their own classroom.  You will turn in the lesson plan and handout the day you present your lesson.  Your lesson will be anonymously peer reviewed.  You will receive the peer reviews on the day the lesson is presented.  The following class period, you are to turn in a reflection of the lesson presentation.  What went well?  What would you change?  What type of feedback did you receive?  Be sure to access the discrepant event/mini lesson rubric.  Students will sign up for a topic and presentation date on 2/6.

 5.  Literature Based Lesson Plan-  In class, there will be a selection of children’s books that you can choose from to tie in to a science lesson (or you may choose your own).  The lesson plan should follow the Science Lesson Plan format discussed in class, and be inquiry based 5E Learning Cycle Plan.  This plan will also be included in your final Unit Plan project and count as one of the 4 lessons required.  

 6.  NSTA Journal Article Reflection- The reflection papers you will be handing in to me are your chance to add your own thoughts and analysis to what you have read. I do NOT want you to summarize the readings - I already know the content of the readings.  What you SHOULD do is use the readings as a “jumping off” point to write on your thoughts about the reading (see list of tips below).   Reflection papers are worth 15 points each and are used for discussion during the class they are due. As such, you need to have your reflection paper printed and in front of you on the day it is due (as well as emailed to me by 10am). This is part of being prepared for class and your class participation grade will be lowered if you aren’t prepared to share your ideas with the class when a reflection paper is due.  To get full credit for your journal reflection papers:

     • Make sure everything is grammatically correct, spelled correctly and makes sense.

• Go into detail in explaining yourself and your ideas. Show me you truly understand the concepts in the reading.

• Don’t summarize the readings. Instead, comment on your thoughts regarding the reading - do you agree or disagree with what was written? Why or why not? Did the reading make you question or think about something else? What questions were you left with after doing the reading? Can you relate the reading to something going on in the media today? Does the author of a given reading have a valid and logical argument?

• Length of reflection papers should be at least 1 page long. A one-page paper should be extremely well-written and concise.  Most students tend to write about 2 pages.

 

7.  Mid Term Case Study Analysis- You will receive a case study detailing an actual classroom science lesson.  It will be your job to analyze the case applying the concepts we have discussed up to that point.  The case analysis has four main parts.  The four parts are not to be separated out, but rather incorporated into one flowing paper that connects the four parts cohesively. 

ü  The first part is a summary of the situation-  the teacher, his or her background, the student make-up, type of district, type of lesson and any other important information that needs to be mentioned. 

ü  The second part is where you begin to analyze the issues of the case.  You may begin with the good things that you saw going on in the classroom.  For everything you feel he/she did that demonstrates inquiry based science teaching, solid classroom management, effective questioning strategies, etc. you must cite a source that says that this is good practice.  Your citations must follow proper APA citation rules.  A great summary for citation basics can be found at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/02/

ü  The third part is where you analyze the situations that you think need improvement.  Where did the teacher fall short?  Again, you must apply the situation to our sources of study.  Don’t just say that the teacher only used closed questioning strategies.   Use sources to support your claim that this is not the best practice in a science classroom.  (and then cite those sources)

ü  The fourth part is where you make recommendations for improvement.  If you were in this classroom, what would you do differently?  This can be difficult and there is not always a “right” answer, but your recommendations should tie in to the previous parts where you cited sound science teaching theories and assessments. 

8.  The Alligator Experiment-  The student will take home materials to conduct their own experiment using growing alligators.   Details will be given in class and a detailed lab write up will be required. 

9.  Lesson Plan Critique-  This is a reflective piece where you read through a textbook lesson plan and evaluate the following:

ü  Does the plan meets the learning objectives of the Missouri Grade Level Expectations for the age level in which you hope to teach.  If so, which Strand?

ü  Does the plan have some way to assess what student’s already know on the topic?  If not, what would you add?

ü  Does the plan build upon student’s prior knowledge and scaffold their new knowledge?  How?  If not, what could you do to construct meaning for the students?

ü  Is the plan simple enough for you to reproduce with readily available materials

ü  Which DOK levels are evaluated?

ü  Is the assessment suggested for the lesson adequate in your opinion?

ü  Would you use actually use this? 

ü  How could you expand this lesson even further?

ü  Can you think of a way to tie in literature to this lesson (or another discipline)?

10.  Concept Maps-  You will be required to construct two concept maps that will ultimately be included in your Unit Plan.  The 1st Concept Map is an overview of the topics of study for the grade level you hope to teach and plan to base your Unit Plan upon.  The 2nd Concept Map should be based on the Unit topic.  See Concept Map Rubric and class discussion for more guidance. 

11.  Science Unit Plan-  This will be your final assessment for the course.  It must include- (minimimum)

§  Cover page with your name, name of the unit, intended grade for the unit, and the date

§  Two concept maps- one of the grade level content in which you hope to teach and one of the unit topic itself

§  AT LEAST Four Learning Cycle lesson plans containing inquiry based experiments and activities

§  One must be a Literature based science lesson plan; one must incorporate technology

§  Philosophy of Science Teaching (final Draft)  

  • An additional Checklist of requirements will be posted on e-companion

 

12.  Class Participation and Attendance-  Class participation is necessary and must be demonstrated as described in the Rubric for Evaluating Class Attendance and Participation.  It is the expectation of the Professor that all assignments are completed and read thoroughly enough to participate in class discussion on the readings.  

Grading:

Assignments                                                                                     Point Value

Reflection Questions (6)       60                                                                       

Science Philosophy Draft 1                                                                      10           

Science Philosophy Draft 2                                                                      30

Concept Maps of Curriculum (2)                                                              20

Literature Based Lesson *to be included in Unit                                     50

Science Journal Article Reflection                                                          10

Case Study Analysis Mid Term                                                              100

Alligator Lab (done at home)                                                                   90

Lesson Plan Critique                                                                                10

Mini Lesson Plan and Presentation for Class                                          70

Class Participation                                                                                  52

Unit Plan                                                                                               160

                                                             TOTAL                                    662

A= 90-100%; 

B= 80-89%; 

C= 70-79%; 

D= 60-69%; 

F= 59%  and below 

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Late assignments will lose 20% credit per day late unless arrangements have been made in advance with the instructor.  Full or partial credit may be awarded at the discretion of the instructor depending on the circumstances that resulted in the assignment being turned in late.  

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
1.  Please demonstrate respect to your peers, the instructor, the material covered, and any visitors to the classroom.  Respect includes listening when the instructor, guest or peer is speaking or has the floor.  Remember that respect is something you earn.  

2.  Students must recognize that technology can create problems such as printers that run out of ink or hard drives that crash.  Students must be responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines in spite of technology.  Be sure to save copies of your work to a USB, hard drive AND print out paper copies for back up purposes.  Technology malfunctions do not excuse late assignments.  
3.  When absences do occur, you must inform your instructor through email before the next class session in order to receive an excused absence.  It is at the discretion of the instructor whether the reason warrants an excused absence or not.  It is your responsibility to obtain any missed work and turn in any assignments that were due.  
4.  All bibliography and internet searches must be annotated giving specific information as to what is found at each site.  If a lesson plan is found on the internet that may be used, you must 1.  Attach the original lesson plan.  2.  Carefully detail what adaptations you have made to the plan.  If you are found plagiarizing a web site's lesson plan or any other work from another source, a grade of an F will be given. 
 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

EDE  378 Fall 2012

Syllabus

** This syllabus is subject to change at the discretion of the Professor.

Class Date

Topics

Reading List to be Covered in Class

Assignments Due

By 10:00am the day of class in DROPBOX

Class #1

Aug 20, 2012

-Syllabus,

-The Nature of Science

-Mystery Box Investigation

Teaching Science for all Children, pg. 1-30

 

 

Class # 2

Aug 27,

2011

 

 

-Constructivist Science Teaching

-Brain Basics

- Penny Predictions

- Density

- Mini lesson topics chosen

 

 

Teaching Science for all Children, pg. 1-30

Teaching Science for all Children, pg. 32-61

 

Science Stories, echapter 1 (free when purchased with e chapter 8 at www.cengagebrain.com

 

“Seasons Change and Conceptions Shift- But Not Always as Expected” by John Settlage, Learning From Cases: Unraveling the Complexities of Elementary Science, pg. 103-112; (PDF)

 

“Skin of Water”, Pg. 82-90, Science Stories by Janice Koch (PDF)

Reflection Questions Assignment #1;

 

Class #3

Sept 3, 2012

Labor Day

No Class

 

 

Class #4

Sept 10, 2012

-Inquiry

-5E Learning Cycle

-Lesson Plan   template

-Alligator Experiment assigned

-5E Task Card Activity

-Mini Lessons assigned

Teaching Science for all Children, pg. 124-159; 

 

“Looking at Liquids”,  pg 200-208, Science Stories by Janice Koch (PDF)

 

“Ch-Ch-Ch-Chia Seeds for Inquiry”, Science Scope, April/May 2011, pg. 20-24 (PDF)

Science Philosophy, Draft 1

 

Reflection Questions Assignment #2

 

Class #5

Sept 17, 2012

-Questioning Strategies

-Bonnie Bradley Case Study

-How to Write a Case Study Analysis

 

Bubbleology

Teaching Science for all Children, pg. 160- 191;

 

“How Full is Full”, by Denise S. Mewborne; Learning From Cases: Unraveling the Complexities of Elementary Science, pg. 25-30; (PDF)

 

Bonnie Bradley Case Study, By Rita Silverman- Center for Case Studies in Education, Pace University, NY (PDF)

 

Reflection Questions Assignment # 3

 

Class #6

Sept 24 2012

Science Process Skills

 

Elementary Science Methods, Martin- Chapter 3 The Processes of Science, edownload from www.cengagebrain.com

 

Teaching Science for all Children, pg. 16- 21

 

 

Reflection Questions Assignment # 4

Class #7

Oct 1, 2012

Mini Lesson Presentations

Mid term Case Analysis assigned

“Process Skills Practice and Standardized Tests” by Ryan Capp, Science and Children, pg 28-30 (PDF)

 

“Science 101: What is the best way to represent data?”, by Bill Robertson, Science and Children, pg 66-68 (PDF)

 

Lesson Plan Critique #1

 (You choose any lesson plan you wish to review from Part 2 in our main text)  See guidelines for Lesson plan critique in Assignment descriptions section of syllabus and grading rubric

Class # 8

Oct 8,

2012

Mini Lesson Presentations

Concept maps

 

Curriculum Planning/

Unit Plan overview

 

 

Teaching Science for all Children, pg. 100-123

 

“Never too Young for a Concept Map” by Nancy Gallenstein, Science and Children, September 2005, pg 44-47 (PDF)

 

“Using Concept Maps in the Science Classroom”, by Vanides, Yin, Tomita & Ruiz-Primo, Science Scope, Summer 2005, pg 27-31 (PDF)

 

Alligator Lab Write up due

Class # 9

Oct. 15, 2012

No Class Fall Break

 

 

 

Class #10 Oct 22,

2012

Assessment

Tracy Lewis Case Study

-Photosynthesis

Tracy Lewis Case Study, by Rita Silverman, Center for Case Studies in Education, Pace University, NY

 

Teaching Science for all Children, pg. 192-225

 

“ ‘A’ is for Assessment” by Shannon McNair, Science and Children, September 2004, pgs 24-27 (PDF)

 

“Formative Assessment Probes:  How Far did it Go?” by Page Keely, Science and Children, January 2011, pg. 24-26. (PDF)

Tracy Lewis Mid-Term Case Analysis Due

 

 

Be prepared to tell me the topic of study for your unit plan final project

Class #11

Oct 29

2012

Mini Lesson Presentations Wrap up

Literacy in Science

Picture Perfect Science Lesson Practice

 

Teaching Science for all Children, pg. 248-269

 

“What is the Shape of a Star?”, by Molly Weinburgh, Learning from Cases, pg. 113-116 (PDF)

 

“No Bones About it!”, by Stacey Neuhath-Pritchett and Jennifer Bellnap, Learning from Cases, Tippins et al., pg. 116-120(PDF

 

“Perspectives: Children’s Literature in the Science Classroom”, by Sandra Abell, Science and Children, November 2004, pg. 54-55.  (PDF)

Concept Map of Science Curriculum for Grade you wish to teach

Class #12

Nov 5, 2012

Diverse Learners


Teaching Science for all Children, pg. 62-99,

 

“Who’s Teaching Whom?”  by Bradford Lewis and Nancy Wagner, Learning From Cases, by Tippins, Koballa, & Payne, pg. 34-38. (PDF)

 

“I Do Not Understand”, by Julie Luft, Learning From Cases, by Tippins, Koballa, & Payne, pg. 85-89.(PDF)

 

“El Secreto De las Ninas” by Cynthia, Jessica, and Angela Calabrese Barton, Learning From Cases, by Tippins, Koballa, & Payne, pg. 147-151 (PDF)

Reflection Questions Assignment #5

 

Concept Map for the UNIT you wish to teach

Class # 13

Nov 12,

2012

No Class -Veterans Day

 

 

Class #14

Nov 19, 2012

Classroom Management and Cooperative Learning Groups

 

Classroom Safety

Field Trips

 

 

- Owl Pellets

 

 

Teaching Science for all Children, pg. 270-313

 

 

“The Strongest Mountain” by Colleen Monnes, Science and Children, October 2004, pg. 35-37 (PDF)

 

To Group or Not to Group, by Melissa A. Warden, Learning From Cases, by Tippins, Koballa, & Payne, pg. 39-42 (PDF)

 

Science-Literature Lesson Plan due

 

Reflection Questions Assignment #6

Class #15

Nov 26 23, 2012

Technology in the Science Classroom

- Electricity

 

 

Teaching Science for all Children, pg. 227-247

 

“Twenty Ways to Assess Student Using Technology” by Sara Aronin and Michael O’Neal, Science Scope, Summer 2011, pg. 25-31 (PDF)

 

“Clash of the Titans” by Karthigeyan Subramamaniam, Science and Children, pg. 38-43 (PDF)

 

“Batteries, Bulbs and Wire” by Janice Koch, Science Stories, pg 254- 268 (PDF)

 

“Matter and Energy” by Janice Koch, Science Stories, excerpts from pgs 339-356 (PDF)  Optional Science Background Reading

NSTA Journal Reflection Due

 (your choice from these two PDF readings)

Class #16

Dec 3, 2012

Being a Reflective Teacher

Professional Development

Teaching Science for all Children, pg. 314-344

“Searching for Professional Development” by Peggy Ashbrook, Science and Children, Summer 2010, pg 44-46 (PDF)

Unit Plan Due (including Science Philosophy Draft 1 & 2, Gr. Level Concept Map, Unit Concept Map, Literature-based lesson, technology based lesson plan and at least two other lessons of your choosing)

 

 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95-96

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 98

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:



























Bibliography:



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
MoStep Standards Knowledge Unit Assessment Selection and evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Science Unit Resources:




1. Effectively gathers and evaluates diverse resources and lessons and adapts these sources in the construction of a science unit.




2. Create appropriate assessment strategies and materials for evaluating the effectiveness of the lessons in the unit.




Unit Assessment Materials and Procedures:




3. Explain in detail how the selected assessments align with learning objectives and outcomes.




4. Clearly explain how the assessment strategies selected are appropriate and will help proficient and struggling learners meet each outcome.




5. Detail strategies for student self -evaluation and the accommodations for special needs students that are specific to the lessons objectives and outcomes




 
Science Unit Resources




1. Gathers and evaluates diverse resources and lessons in the development of a science unit.









2. Develop materials for evaluating the effectiveness of the lessons in the unit.




Unit Assessment Materials and Procedures:









3. Explained how the learning objectives and outcomes are aligned with assessments in four to three of the lessons.









4. The assessment strategies are adequate to evaluate the performance of proficient and struggling learners to meet each outcome.









5. Strategies for student self-evaluation and accommodations for special needs students are listed.




 
Science Unit Resources









1.  Gathered  some resources and lesson for the science unit.









2.  Some evaluation of lesson effectiveness suggested.









Unit Assessment Materials and Procedures




3.  Assessments vaguely aligned to objectives in two of the five required lessons.









4.  Some assessment strategies are suggested for performance but no strategies are included for struggling students who are not meeting the outcomes.









5.  Strategies for student self-evaluation and special needs students are implied in two of the lessons.




 
Science Unit Resources









1 and 2 No evidence of effective evaluation of resources or materials for use in the science unit.









Unit Assessment Materials and Procedures









3 - 5 Assessments strategies and or materials not included in the unit.




 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1,2,4,5  MoSTEP Performance Standards 1.1.1,1.1.2, 1.1.4, 4.4.1 Unit Development. sections                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Incorporates the following criteria to create a meaningful science unit:









1.  The unit is an original synthesis with carefully documented resources in the appropriate format.









2.  The work demonstrates creativity and expansion throughout the lessons in the unit and appropriate for curriculum goals that are relevant to the learners.









a. The 17 or more elements listed in the unit requirements are developed thoroughly.









b. The teaching strategies are constructivist, original, demonstrate effective instruction, are well organized, and appropriate for the age or grade level intended.









c. The original author(s) of the lessons included in the unit are identified correctly referenced in APA format.  









d. Artifacts are included, labeled, and are excellent quality.












































 
1.  The unit is an original synthesis with documented resources in the appropriate format.









2.  Most of the lessons demonstrate creativity and expansion.









 a. At least 14 of the listed elements in the unit are well developed.









b. Most of the teaching strategies are original, and organized and appropriate for the age or grade level intended.









c. The original author(s) of the lessons included in the unit are referenced.  









d. Artifacts are included and labeled.










































































 
1.  The unit lacks originality with limited synthesis, but resources are documented.









2.  The unit demonstrates a lack of creativity and expansion in the majority of the lessons.









 a. Ten of the seventeen or more listed elements required in the unit are somewhat developed.









 b. Most of the teaching strategies lack originality, but have some organization. Age or grade level appropriateness is questionable









 c. The original author(s) of the lessons included in the unit are referenced.  









  d.  Artifacts are included but are of poor quality. 
1.  Majority of the unit is copied directly from another author or source. The source or author is not referenced or credited with the work.









a. The unit has 5 or less listed elements.









b. Lacks teaching strategies are missing.









c. The unit is unorganized and not developmentally appropriate for the grade level intended.














 d. Artifacts are missing.



































































































 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
2,4 Learning Goals/objectives MoStep Performance Standards 4.4.1, 4.4.2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Selects and creates goals/outcomes for the science unit that are aligned with National and State Standards:









1.  Five or more lessons are aligned with National and State Standards.









2  .Five outcomes /goals for the unit are explained at the beginning of the unit and identified in each related lesson.









3.  The evaluation(s) have the appropriate outcome/goal cited.









4.  Two measurable behavior objectives that include various levels of Bloom's Taxonomy for identified for each lesson.









5.  Objectives are developmentally appropriate for the age group intended 
1.  Five or more lessons are aligned with National and State Standards.









2. Five outcomes /goals for the unit are explained at the beginning of the unit.









3.  One measurable objective that make use of Bloom's Taxonomy for each lesson...









4.  Objectives are developmentally appropriate for the age group intended


















































































































 
1. Four to three of the lessons are aligned with National and State Standards









2.  Four to three outcomes /goals for the unit are listed, but not clearly connected to the specific lessons.









3.  One measurable behavior objective for each lesson.









4.  Some of the objectives are not developmentally appropriate for the age group intended.























































































































 
1. Two or less of the lessons are aligned with National and State Standards.









2. Two or less outcomes /goals for the unit are not listed at the beginning of each lesson.









3. Each lesson does not have a measurable behavior objective lesson.









4.  Objectives are inappropriate for the age group intended 
Concepts Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
Outcomes
1,2,3,4,5,6 Unit lessons Effective Instruction MoSTEP PerformanceStandards 2.2.1,2.2.4,3.1.1,3.1.2, 3.1.3,5.1..1, 5.1.2,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Applies the required criteria to create a constructivist standards based science instructional unit:




1. Construct a neatly organized concept map(based on Missouri GLE's) with directional arrows that show the flow of the ideas and logical connections between concepts and terms.




2. Select a developmentally appropriate science strand to construct a science unit for the grade level intended.




3.  The learning goals/objectives are described, measurable, aligned with Missouri Science Grade Level Expectations.




4. Applies a variety of detailed and creative formative assessments strategies. Summative assessment products are appropriate for the intended grade level (experimental design, portfolio, performance assessment, learning logsā€¦).  




5.  Four or more constructivist lessons that are creative, exciting, motivating and contain the required criteria describe in the syllabus




6.  The Field Trip Lesson Plan demonstrates the 4-e learning cycle, connects to the unit goals, utilizes the diverse community resources to enhance the instruction and contains:.




a. Parent and Principal letters




b. Trip agenda




c. Rationale for the trip. (objectives connection)




d. Trip location the GKC area.




e. Plan has all required elements in the syllabus.




 
1. Organized concept map(based on Missouri GLE's) with directional arrows adequately connect some ideas with concepts and terms.




2. The unit strand mostly developmentally appropriate for the grade level intended.




.




3.  The learning goals/objectives are described, measurable, aligned with Missouri Science Grade Level Expectations.









4. Adequate formative and summative assessments are included for the each lesson.









5.  Three of the lessons are constructivist lessons that are creative and contain the required criteria describe in the syllabus









6.  The Field Trip Lesson Plan connects to the curriculum goals in the unit by utilizing the diverse community resources to enhance the instruction. The plan contains most of the required elements described in the syllabus.




 
1. Concept map does not show the flow of the ideas or logical connections between words and terms.









2. The unit strand is not developmentally appropriate for the grade level intended. instruction procedures.









3.  Several of the learning goals/objectives are not measurable or aligned with Missouri Science Grade Level Expectations.









4. Assessments are not included with the lessons or are not appropriate.









5.  One lesson plan is  constructivist and  contains the required criteria describe in the syllabus.









6.  A Field Trip Lesson Plan is included but does not include most of the required elements listed in the syllabus.




 
Concept map missing.









Alignment with the with the Missouri GLE"S missing









Unit is not developmentally appropriate for the indicated grade level.









Lesson plans lack:




Standards









Required elements listed in the syllabus.









Clarity of procedures for instruction and are not constructivist.  









Lessons are copied directly from internet or other sources.









Proper format (4-E lesson components)









Formative and summative assessments.









Field trip plan not included.




 
Content of  Unit Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
1, 2,3, 4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
1. Concept map logical organized, with directional arrows, and error free.




2.  Scientific inquiry processes are presented so that children are discovering the concepts through exploration and experimentation.




3.  Required lessons (5) are communicated in the 4-e learning cycle format.




4.  All synthesized work referenced in APA format..




5. Written instructions and expectations are precisely communicated.




6.  Classroom safety described and logical.




7. Activity sheets and other assessment tools are high quality and error free.




 
1. Concept map organized and error free.




2.  Scientific inquiry processes are adequate for teaching concepts through exploration and experimentation.




3.  Required lessons (5) are communicated in the 4-e learning cycle format.




4.  All synthesized work referenced in APA format..




5. Written instructions and expectations are communicated.




6. Classroom safety discussed.




7. Activity sheets and other assessment tools are of adequate quality and error free.









 
1. Concept map un-organized contains some error.




2.  Scientific inquiry processes vaguely presented.  Very traditional approach with few hands on opportunities for children.




3.  Required lessons have elements of  the 4-e learning cycle missing.




4.  Synthesized work not correctly referenced.




5. Written instructions confusing and contains error.




6. Classroom safety ignored.




7. Activity sheets and other assessment tools poor with error.




 
1. Concept map poor quality or missing




2.  Scientific inquiry processes missing.




3.  Required lessons missing learning cycle.




4.  References missing




5. Written instructions poorly communicated.




6. Classroom safety ignored




7. Activity sheets and other assessment tools poor quality many errors.




 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
1,2,3,5,6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Well written science unit, free of grammatical and typographic errors. All required components are included and clearly identified.




1. Cover page/references




2.MLO/GLE/outcomes/objectives




3.  Concept map




4.  Blooms Level




5.  Five constructivist lesson plans (4-e learning cycle).




6.  Assessment strategy




7.  Essential vocabulary




8.  Children's literature.




9. Integration with other disciplines.




10.  Science safety planned in unit.




 
There are a few minor grammatical or typographic errors.




All of the required components are included and identified.









 
Unit lacks proof reading.




Three of the required components are missing or not identified.









 
Poorly written with many grammatical errors.




Four or more of the required components are missing or not identified.




 
Science Literacy                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
MoSTEP 1.2.1.1; 1.2.1.2 Unifying Concepts and Processes SSC: 1.2;CR Gen Ed; ACEI: Standard 2b.NSTA Standard 1NSES: UCP-1-5)(1.1 systems, order, and organization; 1.2 evidence, models, and explanation; 1.3 change constancy, and measurement; 1.4 evolution and equilibrium; 1.5 form and function.)                                                                                                                                                                                                               
1 .  High quality application of the unifying concepts and processes are easily identifiable in each required lessons in the unit.  




2. Science knowledge and processes are clearly described in each of the required lessons in the unit.  




3. Excellent strategies for teaching the major science concepts and principles are relevant to the theme and how students learn. The is scientific information included in the strategies accurate and developmentally appropriate for the intended grade level




 
1. The unifying concepts and processes are identified in each required lesson in the unit.  




2. Science knowledge and processes are described in most of the required lessons in the unit.  




3.  Strategies for teaching the major science concepts and principles related to the theme included. The information included in the strategies is scientifically accurate and developmentally appropriate




 
1. Some reference to the unifying concepts and processes with minimal application in the lessons.




2.  Science knowledge and processes are listed.




3.  Strategies for teaching the major science concepts and principles are not developed or are not grade level appropriate




 
1. Did not apply or reference the unifying concepts and processes in the unit.  









 
Science As Inquiry                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Outcomes
SSC: 1.1,1.4; CR SSC: 1.2;CR Gen Ed; ACEI: Standard 2b.NSTA Standard 3 NSES: e-A1, A2;S7; ETS 0011: 111. 3- 4)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
1.  Required lessons provided opportunities for students to participate in scientific inquiry as a result of the lessons and experiences designed in the unit.




2.  Planned expansion of the lessons lead to students (a) asking questions that lead to investigations; (b) use of appropriate tools to gather data appropriate to the investigation; (c) develop descriptions, explanations, predictions and models; (d) think critically /logically using the data to explain results of observations/experimental results, draw conclusions.




 
1. The required lessons provided some opportunities for students to participate in scientific inquiry as a result of the lessons and experiences designed in the unit 1. Opportunities for students to participate in scientific inquiry are vaguely alluded to but not described. 1. Opportunities were not developed the unit to involve children in scientific inquiry. 
Instructional Strategies                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
Outcomes 1-6--Common Core: (1997  SSC: 4.1-4; 2002 CEC: CC4S1-6; CR: III A-C;--Praxis: see designated test on category-specific competencies docs) Cross-CAT: (1997 SSC: 4.1-7, 5.4, 5.5; 2002 CEC: GC4K1-7, GC4S1-16; CR: III A-C; Praxis 0353: I-C, II-A, II-C; 0542: II-A,C,D)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Required lessons provide strategies to teach individuals how to use self-assessment, problem solving and other cognitive strategies to meet their needs. ----Required lessons involve the selection, adaptation, and use of research-based instructional strategies and materials based on the learning needs of the student.----Required lessons utilize procedures to increase the individual's self-awareness, self-management, self-control, self-reliance, and self-esteem. The required lessons provided some strategies to teach individuals how to use self-assessment, problem solving and other cognitive strategies to meet their needs. Strategies to teach individuals how to use self-assessment, problem solving and other cognitive strategies to meet their needs are vaguely alluded to but not described. Strategies to teach individuals how to use self-assessment, problem solving and other cognitive strategies to meet their needs were not developed in the unit. 

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Last Updated:7/25/2012 1:03:21 AM