Syllabus Entrance
Printer Friendly
Email Syllabus
Education Major Version

CA 115 Intro Electronic Communication
Youngblood, Steven


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

CA 115 Intro to Electronic Communication

Semester

FA 2012 HO

Faculty

Youngblood, Steven

Title

Assoc. Prof., Communication Arts

Degrees/Certificates

BA-KSU
BS-KU

Office Location

205 Copley

Office Hours

Will be distributed in class

Daytime Phone

584-6321

E-Mail

steve.youngblood@park.edu

Web Page

http://captain.park.edu/youngblood/ca115.htm

Semester Dates

fall 12

Class Days

m-w

Class Time

12-1:15

Prerequisites

none

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 

COURSE TEXTBOOK:

 

None, although there will be a number of required readings from handouts and web sites.

Additional Resources:

Will be provided in class.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:

 

This is a survey of the origins and operation of broadcast and computer media.

Intro to Electronic Communication is an introductory level class. This class will help you develop a basic understanding of the way broadcasters and internet providers operate, and how broadcasters, the public (the audience), and the government interact.

Educational Philosophy:
 

I believe learning should be hands-on process, and that teaching should be done using a variety of tools and approaches.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe, analyze and discuss the theory and history of radio, TV, and the Internet. This will be demonstrated in papers and projects describing and analyzing changes in the electronic media.
  2. Describe, evaluate, and analyze the role of government in regulating electronic media. This will be demonstrated in papers and projects describing and analyzing the interplay between government and electronic media, particularly in cases relating to indecency.
  3. Discuss analytically the changing role electronic media play in society, and the societal impact of the mass media.
  4. Develop and describe criteria for determining how, as parents, students will control their children's media consumption.
  5. List and discuss analytically the characteristics of quality journalism across many media, and the role journalists play in society.


Core Assessment:

Core Assessment


The core assessment for CA115 Introduction to Electronic Communication will be a take-home final examination. A copy of the exam is pasted below.


 


Directions:


You will be writing four two-page essays on the topics listed below. You will write both the essays in category A; then you will choose two from among those listed in category B.


 


An acceptable (B-C) essay must do the following:



  1. Address the question(s) posed;
  2. Use lecture notes and handouts from class as evidence to support your position;
  3. Be the appropriate length (1 ¾ pages to 2 ¼ pages);
  4. Provide some insight or analysis about the question;
  5. Be grammatically correct, use good spelling, etc. 

An exceptional (A) essay will do all the following listed above. It will also:



  1. Provide a more sophisticated analysis of the subject, showing originality of thought;
  2. Use 1-2 pieces of outside (student conducted) research to support the writer’s position. 

Essay topics—Category A. All students must answer both of these questions:



  1. What is indecency, by both your definition and the FCC’s? How has the Super Bowl incident changed the rules for indecency? What is the future for indecency enforcement?
  2. How would society be different if TV were banned? Would our kids, and our families, benefit from this? 
  3. Essay topics—Category B. Select and answer any two of these questions.
  4. What is the future for media in Iraq? Will media ever be free there?
  5. How have changes in media ownership changed the media landscape?
  6. Rate the effectiveness, now and in the future, of the Internet as a marketing tool and as an advertising medium.
  7. Discuss and evaluate the effectiveness of TV election coverage in November. Did TV learn from the mistakes of 2000?
  8. What is the future of broadcast radio, given the changes in media ownership and the competition from satellite radio?

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
 

Your grade will be based on a number of short papers and projects, three quizzes, on class attendance and participation, and on a take-home final. See details of grading plan in last section.

Grading:
   

10%-Radio log/War of the Worlds paper

10-Amos and Andy reaction paper

10-Three unit quizzes—based on lectures and readings

10-Short International media paper

10-Weekly news quizzes

10-Short ethics paper

10-Kids and TV paper

10-Web site critique

20-Take home final. More on this later.

Late Submission of Course Materials:
 

 

I will not accept late work. This applies to all daily work, papers, lab work, final projects, and so on. The only exception to this is if there is some extenuating circumstance, and you contact me IN ADVANCE to get an extension. If you have a problem that precludes you from turning a work in on time, call or e-mail me IN ADVANCE of the due date, let me know what’s going on, and we can make arrangements.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Respect one another, and be open to new ideas.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
 

 

COURSE TOPICS AND DATES:

Subject to change. In fact, count on it!!

Week 1

Theme: Media trends and convergence

Topics: New media, technology, digital, media ownership and economics

Week 2

Theme: International media studies

Topics: Overview, Peace Journalism, Islam in U.S. media, International Press Freedom

Week 3

Theme: FCC

Topics: Background, regulations, indecency

Week 4

Theme: Radio

Topics: History, trends, formats, programming, ratings, shock radio

Week 5

Theme: Radio shows, old time dramas, sports and talk radio

Topics: History, trends, formats, programming, ratings

Week 6

Theme: TV overview

Topics: TV history, technology, trends, ratings/Arbitron

Week 7

Theme: TV overview

Topics: Cable TV, TV programming, TV and the Internet

Week 8

Theme: TV and kids

Topics: Government regulations, sex/violence, TV and talk

Week 9

Theme: Intro to the Internet

Topics: The basics, net as research tool, entertainment, porn, online education

Week 10

Theme: Broadcasting, and broadcasters, on the net; Web site design

Topics: Introduction to, search, goals, web site design basics

Week 11

Theme: Newspaper web sites

Topics: Introduction to, search, goals, more design, site critiques

Week 12

Theme: Internet and society; Advertising; Media and the Election

Topics: Net effects on society, advertising trends, ads by medium, FTC, Media impact on election, voter turnout

Week 13-14

Topics: Ethics, Libel, Invasion of Privacy on radio, TV, net. Also, journalism ethics.

Week 15

Topics: Media and society, antisocial behavior, etc.

Week 16

Topic: Media criticism and analysis

Topics: Student analysis of media coverage of current issues and topics

Supplemental-

Topics: The future; employment in the electronic media, future of radio, TV, net; employment opportunities.

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95-96

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 98

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The final critically discusses four or more tenants of good broadcasting and Internet journalism The final critically discusses three tenants of good broadcasting and Internet journalism The final critically discusses one or two tenants of radio broadcasting and Internet journalism The final does not address tenants of good broadcasting and Internet journalism 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The final demonstrates student's ability to use four or more sources The final demonstrates student's ability to use three or more sources The final demonstrates student's ability to use one or two or more sources The final does not use outside sources. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The final demonstrates student's ability to thoughtfully, creatively critique the mass media and its effect on society The final demonstrates student's ability to critique the mass media and its effect on society The final demonstrates student's ability to critique the mass media and its effect on society, but those ideas lack original thought The mass media critique is inconsistent with the assignment,  not original and/or not creative 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The final demonstrates student's ability to thoughtfully, creatively analyze the economic principles of  mass media The final demonstrates student's ability to thoughtfully analyze the economic principles of mass media The final demonstrates the student's ability only to regurgitate materials presented in class related to the economic principles of mass media The final does not demonstrate knowledge of materials presented in class related to the economic principles of mass media 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Final specifically addresses the questions, using strong evidence and statistics, and demonstrates a sophisticated understanding of mass media theory. Final is specifically address the questions, and demonstrates an understanding of mass media theory. Final addresses the questions but without specifics, and demonstrates a peripheral understanding of mass media theory. Final does not address the questions, and does not demonstrate any understanding of mass media or mass media theory. 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The final is clearly and creatively written, is concise, and grammatically correct. The final is clearly written, is concise, and grammatically correct. The final is clear in most places, but occasionally wordy, and contains some grammatical and spelling errors. The final is unclear and wordy, and contains many grammatical and spelling errors. 
Disciplinary Literacy: FCC and Broadcasting                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
On the final, students will precisely define and provide sophisticated, insightful analysis of the role of the FCC as it relates to broadcasting in general and specifically to indecency. On the final, students will define and insightfully analyze the role of the FCC as it relates to broadcasting in general and specifically to indecency. On the final, students will define and analyze the role of the FCC as it relates to broadcasting in general and specifically to indecency, though these definitions and analysis may be incomplete or only partially correct. Students will fail either to define or to analyze the role of the FCC as it relates to broadcasting in general and specifically to indecency; or, these definitions or analysis may be incorrect. 
Disciplinary Literacy: TV and Kids                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Outcomes
4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
On the final, students will discuss and analyze, in a sophisticated manner, the role TV plays in children's lives, and develop insightful guidelines for their own children with regards to TV viewing. On the final, students will discuss and analyze the role TV plays in children's lives, and develop guidelines for their own children with regards to TV viewing. On the final, students will discuss and analyze the role TV plays in children's lives, and develop guidelines for their own children with regards to TV viewing; however, this discussion and analysis may be incomplete, or may be only a regurgitation from other sources. Students will fail to discuss the role TV plays in children's lives, or will provide only limited analysis, or will provide incorrect analysis indicating a lack of understanding of the subject. 

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:7/30/2012 9:15:52 AM