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MA 120 Basic Concepts of Statistics
Willcox, John


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

MA 120 Basic Concepts of Statistics

Semester

F1T 2012 DLD

Faculty

Willcox, John

Title

Senior Instructor

Degrees/Certificates

BS Mathematics
MA Industrial Management
MA Logistics Management

Office Location

On Line

Office Hours

Respond within 48 hours but prefer email.

Daytime Phone

509 276 9466 Please leave name and phone number, slowly.

Other Phone

FAX  509 276 9466

E-Mail

John.Willcox@park.edu

johnowx@peoplepc.com

Semester Dates

08/20/12 to 10/14/12

Class Days

Monday thru Sunday

Class Time

24 Hours per day, but prefer students in class through out week, and NOT Sunday only!

Prerequisites

None.  Should have a basic understanding of math concepts. If not, recommend College Mathematics or Algebra.

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Textbook:

Required Textbook

Required: Includes e-book version of the textbook.

Optional: Elementary Statistics, 11th Ed. w/Multimedia Study Guide
Authors: Mario F. Triola
Publisher: Addison-Wesley
ISBN: 
9780321500243

 

A fee for access to MyMathLab (MML) for students is now collected by Park at the time of enrollment into the course. The student pays regular tuition and a lab fee to Park. This streamlined payment method should eliminate many of the problems we have faced in the past with students purchasing the wrong MML Access Kit. In addition, this method allows access to MML to our students at a lower cost. A win-win situation!

With access to MML, the student has the e-book version of the textbook. Use of the e-book has been approved, and therefore, the only requirement for this course is access to MML, which is guaranteed with the required lab fee now in place. The student is responsible for making copies of applicable pages and charts for the final exam.
 
If a student wants to use a hardcopy textbook IN ADDITION to the e-book, they may do so, but it is NOT REQUIRED.

 

 

Supplemental Materials

 

You will need to have access to a scientific calculator. You will not be allowed to use a programmable, or graphing calculator on your final exam, nor will you be able to use a computer, so you will need to take a hand-held scientific calculator with you for the final exam. I suggest you use the same calculator throughout the course. Then you will be familiar with it and will avoid having to learn how to use a new calculator at final exam time.

I do not have a brand requirement, but the cost of most brands run about $10 - $15 and can be found in office supply stores or department stores.

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:
Student should have a basic Scientific Calculator such as a Texas Instrument or Casio. These calculators sell from $10-$15.  Park University does NOT allow programable calculators (TI 83 etc.) for the MA 120 Final, so please get a scientific for class use.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
A development of certain basic concepts in probability and statistics that are pertinent to most disciplines.  Topics include:  probability models, parameters, statistics and sampling procedures, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression.  3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:

The syllabus has priority.  If conflict exist with the Syllabus and Class instructions, the Syllabus has priority.  If you have any questions on conflicts then please post this in the instructors On line Office for resolution.

Each student is responsible for: •

 o Completing weekly reading assignments.

o Participating (during the week and NOT waiting until the weekend) in weekly discussions and study groups.

o Completing weekly homework and quizzes on time 

o Completing a proctored examination during Week 8.
 
 

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  • Compute descriptive statistics for raw data as well as grouped data.
    MoSTEP
    1.1.1 The general studies include the arts, communications, history, literature, mathematics, philosophy, sciences, and the social sciences.
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    SPAs
    • NCTM: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 12.2
    • NAEYC: 4c
    • ACEI: 2.3
    • NMSA: 3.k1-3.k12
    • MoSTEP UNIFIED SCIENCE 1.4; NSTA 1.B. C.1 & C.2; NSTA 2; NSTA 3
  • Determine appropriate features of a frequency distribution.
    MoSTEP
    1.1.1 The general studies include the arts, communications, history, literature, mathematics, philosophy, sciences, and the social sciences.
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    SPAs
    • NCTM: 1.2, 12.2
    • NAEYC: 4c
    • ACEI: 2.3
    • NMSA: 3.k1-3.k12
    • MoSTEP UNIFIED SCIENCE 1.4; NSTA 1.B. C.1 & C.2; NSTA 2; NSTA 3
  • Apply Chebyshev's Theorem.
    MoSTEP
    1.1.1 The general studies include the arts, communications, history, literature, mathematics, philosophy, sciences, and the social sciences.
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    SPAs
    • NCTM:  1.2, 12.2
    • NAEYC: 4c
    • ACEI: 2.3
    • NMSA: 3.k1-3.k12
    • MoSTEP UNIFIED SCIENCE 1.4; NSTA 1.B. C.1 & C.2; NSTA 2; NSTA 3
  • Distinguish between and provide relevant descriptions of a sample and a population.
    MoSTEP
    1.1.1 The general studies include the arts, communications, history, literature, mathematics, philosophy, sciences, and the social sciences.
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    SPAs
    • NCTM: 12.2
    • NAEYC: 4c
    • ACEI: 2.3
    • NMSA: 3.k1-3.k12
    • MoSTEP UNIFIED SCIENCE 1.4; NSTA 1.B. C.1 & C.2; NSTA 2; NSTA 3
  • Apply the rules of combinatorics.
    MoSTEP
    1.1.1 The general studies include the arts, communications, history, literature, mathematics, philosophy, sciences, and the social sciences.
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    SPAs
    • NCTM: 1.2, 12.3
    • NAEYC: 4c
    • ACEI: 2.3
    • NMSA: 3.k1-3.k12
    • MoSTEP UNIFIED SCIENCE 1.4; NSTA 1.B. C.1 & C.2; NSTA 2; NSTA 3
  • Differentiate between classical and frequency approaches to probability.
    MoSTEP
    1.1.1 The general studies include the arts, communications, history, literature, mathematics, philosophy, sciences, and the social sciences.
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    SPAs
    • NCTM: 12.4
    • NAEYC: 4c
    • ACEI: 2.3
    • NMSA: 3.k1-3.k12
    • MoSTEP UNIFIED SCIENCE 1.4; NSTA 1.B. C.1 & C.2; NSTA 2; NSTA 3
  • Apply set-theoretic ideas to events.
    MoSTEP
    1.1.1 The general studies include the arts, communications, history, literature, mathematics, philosophy, sciences, and the social sciences.
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    SPAs
    • NCTM: 1.2, 12.2, 12.3
    • NAEYC: 4c
    • ACEI: 2.3
    • NMSA: 3.k1-3.k12
    •  MoSTEP UNIFIED SCIENCE 1.4; NSTA 1.B. C.1 & C.2; NSTA 2; NSTA 3
  • Apply basic rules of probability.
    MoSTEP
    1.1.1 The general studies include the arts, communications, history, literature, mathematics, philosophy, sciences, and the social sciences.
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    SPAs
    • NCTM: 1.2, 12.3
    • NAEYC: 4c
    • ACEI: 2.3
    • NMSA: 3.k1-3.k12
    • MoSTEP UNIFIED SCIENCE 1.4; NSTA 1.B. C.1 & C.2; NSTA 2; NSTA 3
  • Apply the concepts of specific discrete random variables and probability distributions.
    MoSTEP
    1.1.1 The general studies include the arts, communications, history, literature, mathematics, philosophy, sciences, and the social sciences.
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    SPAs
    • NCTM: 1.2, 12.2, 12.3
    • NAEYC: 4c
    • ACEI: 2.3
    • NMSA: 3.k1-3.k12
    • MoSTEP UNIFIED SCIENCE 1.4; NSTA 1.B. C.1 & C.2; NSTA 2; NSTA 3
  • Compute probabilities of a normal distribution.
    MoSTEP
    1.1.1 The general studies include the arts, communications, history, literature, mathematics, philosophy, sciences, and the social sciences.
    1.2.1.1 knows the discipline applicable to the certification area(s) as defined by Subject Competencies for Beginning Teachers in Missouri;
    SPAs
    • NCTM: 1.2, 12.2, 12.3
    • NAEYC: 4c
    • ACEI: 2.3
    • NMSA: 3.k1-3.k12
    • MoSTEP UNIFIED SCIENCE 1.4; NSTA 1.B. C.1 & C.2; NSTA 2; NSTA 3  
  • Compute confidence intervals of means and percentages.
  • Perform hypothesis tests involving one population.
  • Compute regression and correlation of Bi-variate data.

      Instructor Learning Outcomes
    1. Able to calculate standard deviations from Grouped Data
    2. Calculate Linear Regression Projections
    3. Understand Use of Normal Curve and t Curve Distribution
    4. Become familiar with how hypothesis testing relates to quality control
    Core Assessment:

    Description of MA 120 Core Assessment


     


    One problem with multiple parts for each numbered item, except for item #3, which contains four separate problems.


     


    1.         Compute the mean, median, mode, and standard deviation for a sample of 8 to 12 data.


     


    2.         Compute the mean and standard deviation of a grouped frequency distribution with 4 classes.


     


    3.         Compute the probability of four problems from among these kinds or combinations there of:


                a.         the probability of an event based upon a two-dimensional table;


                b.         the probability of an event that involves using the addition rule;


                c.         the probability of an event that involves conditional probability;


                d.         the probability of an event that involves the use of independence of events;


                e.         the probability of an event based upon permutations and/or combinations;


                f.          the probability of an event using the multiplication rule; or


                g.         the probability of an event found by finding the probability of the complementary event.


     


    4.         Compute probabilities associated with a binomial random variable associated with a practical situation. 
      
    5.         Compute probabilities associated with either a standard normal probability distribution or with a non-standard normal probability distribution.

    6.         Compute and interpret a confidence interval for a mean and/ or for a proportion.

    Link to Class Rubric

    Class Assessment:

    The class will be assessed primarily by discussion/participation, homework, quizzes and the final assessment will be the Final Examination which will open book, notes and non programable calculator.  This will assure the student understands the basic concept of solving and understanding statistical data gathering in order to accomplish follow on University classes.

    Grading:

    The following events will take place each week of class and the student will be responsible for accomplishing each item during that week time for full credit.  The student may receive ONLY a 2 day grace period after the week of assignment then after that, no credit. The student is responsible for accomplishing assignment during the week assigned.  If a student knows about situations that could preclude meeting assignment, the student will make arrangement to complete the work prior to missing class.  For instance, if a student is deployed in week 4, then let the instructor know, so other plans may be made.  The overall objective in an Internet class is to have connection, then if you cannot meet this requirement your grade could be affected.

    The weeks or units follows:

    Unit 1  Chapter 1, Discussion, Homework Problems, Quiz Due

    Unit 2  Chapter 2 , Discussion, Homework Problems , Quiz Due

    Unit 3  Chapter 3, Discussion, Homework Problems , Quiz Due

    Unit 4  Chapter 4, Discussion, Homework Problems , Quiz Due

    Unit 5  Chapter 5, Discussion, Homework Problems , Quiz Due,
    Unit 6  Chapter 6, Discussion, Homework Problems Due., Quiz  Deadline for Proctor Form (if this is not accomplished, 20 points will be deducted from your final)

    Unit 7  Chapter 7, Discussion, Homework Problems, Quiz  Due

    Unit 8  Chapter 8 and 10, Discussion, Homework Problems Due, , Quiz  Final Examination

    Weekly Discussion will be required which will total 15 points each week. Week one which includes an introduction of 10 points along with the discussion of 15 point which will total 25 points.  On line discussions will be graded according to the following rubric. Basically class participation grades are based on the total student and how well he/she uses the class tools. For those that just post (on Week Ends) and meet the requirements expect a satisfactory grade and those that go far beyond, (actively posting throughout the week) then expect a full point grade.
     
    Post your answer by midnight (Mountain Time Zone) Wednesday (NOT Saturday evening)  and please post your response to another student's answer by midnight (Mountain Time Zone) Saturday.  Posted responses by Sunday are unsatisfactory. In conclusion, weekly discussion is 7 days a week, and if you post your discussion requirements on the week end only, then expect only a satistfactory grade.
    9 - 10 pts

    Discussion is clear, relevant and insightful. Interactions go beyond a basic response to the question to provide a critical examination of the issue and/or stimulate critical thinking. Posts show a strong mastery of the content and promote ongoing dialog.

    7 – 8 pts

    Discussion is clear and relevant. Interactions convey the basic information and show strong content knowledge. Postings would benefit from incorporation of critical analysis and insight; need to expand on the reasoning and logic.

    4 – 6 pts

    Discussion addressed the main points but lacks explanation or elaboration. Interactions provide minimal information; need to include justification, support and additional content. Writing needs significant improvement to adhere to professional guidelines.

    0 - 3 pts

    Discussion is vague, irrelevant or off-topic. Interactions are missing or fail to encourage continued dialog.

     

    Grading Rubric

     

    Assignment

    Possible Points

    Total Points

    Total %

    Introduction 5 pts

    5

    0.9

    Introduction Response

    5 pts

    5

    0.9

    Discussion Answer  

    10 pts each

    80

    13.7

    Discussion Response 5 pts each

    40

    6.8

    Homework 15 pts each

    120

    20.5

    Quiz

    20 pts each

    160

    27.4

    Final Exam

    175 pts

    175

    29.9

    TOTAL

    585


    Letter Grade

    Letter

    Number of Points

    Percentage

    A

    524 - 585

    90 - 100%

    B

    466 - 523

    80 - 89.9%

    C

    407 - 465

    70 - 79.9%

    D

    349 - 406

    60 - 69.9%

    F

    000 - 348

    00 - 59.9%

    PROCTORED FINAL EXAM

    • You must follow the Park University procedures for obtaining an approved proctor. Please refer to the Help and Resources page to review the requirements for locating a proctor and the procedure for completing a Proctor Request Form.
    • For proctored examinations, photo identification is required at the time of the test.
    • A proctor request form will be made available to you during the first week of class so that you can send your requested proctor to your instructor for approval. It will be the responsibility of the student to arrange for a proctor, who is accepted and approved by the course instructor, by the 6th week of the term. FAILURE TO MEET THIS DEADLINE WILL RESULT IN 20 POINTS BEING DEDUCTED FROM YOUR FINAL. NO EXCEPTIION SO WORK THIS ISSUE NOW!
    • Approval of proctors is at the discretion of the instructor.
    • Failure to take a final proctored exam (or submit your final project for some on line graduate courses) will result in an automatic "F" grade.

    Late Submission of Course Materials:
    • Submission of Late Work: All work should be completed by the end of each course week.  Students need to insure they do the assignments during that week, and NO excuses will be accepted. The student is required to obtain a proctor and if the proctor is not obtained during the time frame that is required, 20 points may be deducted from the students final.

    REQUIREMENTS YOU MUST FOLLOW IF YOU WILL BE OR ANTICIPATE USING A NON-PARK PROCTOR
    Students, This is an important issue, so if you are going to use a Non Park Proctor, please comply within the SECOND WEEK OF CLASS. 
     
    "If you do not reside within a 1-hour proximity to a Park University Campus, alternative proctors and locations are acceptable as long as I approve your choice of proctor. Park University Campus Center Note: DO NOT complete the Park University Proctor Request Form unless I have approved your non-Park proctor. After you receive MY approval, you then MUST complete your proctor request form before the end of Week 4 of the course.

    In order for me to consider approving anyone using a non-Park proctor please send me an Email proposal in week 2 for a non-Park proctor candidate and answer the following four questions in that email:

     

    1. Why you cannot test at a Park Campus.

     

    2. The name, contact info (phone, fax, Email address) of your proposed [proctor] candidate. Please triple check to insure the address is correct for the proctor.

     

    3. I will need to know the relationship you have with your proposed [proctor] candidate.

     

    4. I will also need to be assured (which means you have to find out) that:

     

    (A) This person is willing to proctor your exam, and can provide a suitable testing environment free from noise, distraction, etc. After all, you are the one who is taking the test - you should make sure you are going to test in an environment which will provide you the best opportunity to do well.

     

    (B) This person has an unimpeded (e.g. free from firewalls) Email delivery system which will allow that person to receive and download a Microsoft Word document sent in Rich Text Format (.rtf) or in Word format (.doc). Often, government Email addresses have fire walls that will not allow direct contact.

     

    (C) This person is willing to, and has the capability to print a Microsoft Word document saved in Rich Text Format (.rtf) or in Word format (.doc).

     

    (D) This person is willing to, and has the capability to email or fax the completed examination/a single page Answer Sheet.

     

    Be advised that I will not approve any non-Park proctor if you have not sent the above requested information to me, so if there is a possibility that you will require the services of a non-Park proctor, it is suggested that you begin the process now, so there are no surprises later.

    If any problems occur with this process beyond the Park University due date, I may take point 20 points off your final

    Classroom Rules of Conduct:
    Online Course Policies: Policy #1:   Submission of Work: • A class week is defined as the period of time between Monday 12:01 am EST and Sunday at 11:59 PM EST. The first week begins the first day of the term/semester. Assignments scheduled for completion during a class week should be completed and successfully submitted by the posted due date. • Create a back up file of every piece of work you submit for grading. This will ensure that a computer glitch or a glitch in cyberspace won't erase your efforts. • When files are sent attached to an email, the files should be in either Microsoft Word, RTF, ASCII, txt, or PDF file formats. Policy #2: Ground Rules for Online Communication & Participation • General email: Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. When sending email other than assignments, you must identify yourself fully by name and class in all email sent to your instructor and/or other members of our class. • Online threaded discussions: are public messages and all writings in this area will be viewable by the entire class or assigned group members. • Online Instructor Response Policy:  Online Instructors will check email frequently and will respond to course-related questions within 24-48 hours. • Observation of "Netiquette": All your Online communications need to be composed with fairness, honesty and tact.  Spelling and grammar are very important in an Online course.  What you put into an Online course reflects on your level of professionalism.  Here are a couple of Online references that discuss writing Online http://goto.intwg.com/ and netiquette http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html. • Please check the Announcements area before you ask general course "housekeeping" questions (i.e. how do I submit assignment 3?).  If you don't see your question there, then please contact your instructor. Policy #3: What to do if you experience technical problems or have questions about the Online classroom.    • If you experience computer difficulties (need help downloading a browser or plug-in, you need help logging into the course, or if you experience any errors or problems while in your Online course, click on the Help button in your Online Classroom, then click on the helpdesk menu item, and then fill out the form or call the helpdesk for assistance. • If the issue is preventing you from submitting or completing any coursework, contact your instructor immediately.

    Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
    You have heard Benjamin Disraeli's assertion: "There are three types of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics." By learning the concepts expressed in this course, you should be able to sort out how the information in collections of data is interpreted (as well as misinterpreted). Each week we'll focus on different aspects of the general properties of data sets, methods of collecting data, ways of analyzing and expressing ideas about data sets, and problem-solving methods based on information contained in our text.

     

    Welcome to Basic Concepts of Statistics. This course provides an introduction to the world of statistical analysis. Each week we'll focus on different aspects of the general topic.

     

    In Unit 1 we'll learn what the topic of statistics entails. We’ll discuss some ways to collect the needed data for a statistical study. By the end the unit we’ll have a view of how the two distinct divisions of statistics, descriptive and inferential, are related.

     

    In Unit 2 we'll discover how to convert pure data into corrupted data, also referred to as ungrouped data into grouped data. Then we will examine some of the many ways data can be visually displayed. We will finish with a consideration of a method matching and graphing two sets of data to analyze the possibility of a relationship. We will return to this analysis graph again in Unit 8 when we discuss correlation and regression.

     

    In Unit 3 we will examine ways to describe data by looking at its central tendency, its variation from its center, and how to determine the location of an element within a data set. A method of finding the proportions of variation a data set possesses will also be covered.

     

    In Unit 4 we'll explore the basic concepts of probabilities, the branch of mathematics that allows us to take a sample and make predictions about the population from which it was derived. We’ll strive to gain a fundamental understanding of probability through its addition, multiplication and counting rules.

     

    In Unit 5 we combine the probability concepts and the statistical concepts we previously learned to construct discrete probability distributions. Then we'll learn how to find statistics of the distribution. The unit ends with a discussion on a specific discrete probability distribution called the binomial distribution.

     

    In Unit 6 the discussion changes from discrete distributions to continuous random variable distributions. We begin looking at the Normal distribution and then quickly moving on the the Standard Normal distribution. We conclude the unit by learing how the Central Limit Theorem can be applied to sample data sets.

     

    In Unit 7 we move into inferential statistcs. We learn how to use a sample mean to estimate the population mean, and how we can confidently report its value within a specific interval.

     

    In Unit 8 we will examine the basics of hypothesis testing by using one-sample procedures for the hypothesis test of the population mean. In addition we will conclude our examination of topics in statistics by discussing the purpose of regression and correlation analysis. First, we'll examine some introductory terms, then focus on simple linear regression analysis and simple linear correlation analysis. During this final week of the course you will also complete the proctored Final Exam and the Course Evaluation.

     

    Academic Honesty:
    Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95-96

    Plagiarism:
    Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

    Attendance Policy:
    Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

    1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
    2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
    3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
    4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
    5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
    6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
    ONLINE NOTE: Students must participate in an academically related activity on a weekly basis in order to be marked present in an online class. Examples of academically-related activities include but are not limited to: contributing to an online discussion, completing a quiz or exam, completing an assignment, initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a course related question, or using any of the learning management system tools.

    Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 98

    Disability Guidelines:
    Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

    Additional Information:

    Questions about assignments or problems?







     

    This is a group class and private instruction will not occur.  If you have any questions that relate to statistics problems, then please post them in the weekly study groups.  These questions can be about the homework, concepts, or even a quiz questions using My Math Lab.  If a student sends me an email, I will ask the student to paste the question in the weekly study group.  The reason for this, is I want to share these with the whole class.  If for some reason the student does not post the email question, I may post the question with answers in the weekly annoucements. 

     

    For sure if the question is of a  personal nature, then this will not be shared with the class.

    Bibliography:
    Instructed for Park University as an Adjunct (Part Time Faculty) Instructor since 1988. Presently at Fairchild AFB Washington teaching for Park University on site and on line in Math and Logistics Disciplines. Courses include Statistics, Quality Control, College Mathematics, Algebra, Pre Calculus, Calculus and Linear Algebra.


    Retired as a Rocket Scientist for Northrop Grumman. Designed and upgraded guidance systems for nuclear Inter-Continental Ballistic Missiles. Spent 20 years in the Air Force as an officer working in Operations, Maintenance, Design, and Acquisition of Communications Electronics Systems in support of communications electronic medians deployed in world wide fixed and tactical environments.



    Rubric

    CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
    Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
    Outcomes
    10                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
    Can perform and interpret a hypothesis test with 100% accuracy. Can perform and interpret a hypothesis test with at least 80% accuracy. Can perform and interpret a hypothesis test with less than 80% accuracy. Makes no attempt to perform a test of hypothesis. 
    Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
    Outcomes
    10                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
    Can compute and interpret a confidence interval for a sample mean for small and large samples, and for a proportion with 100% accuracy. Can compute and interpret a confidence interval for a sample mean for small and large samples, and for a proportion with at least 80% accuracy. Can compute and interpret a confidence interval for a sample mean for small and large samples, and for a proportion with less than 80%  accuracy. Makes no attempt to compute or interpret a confidence interval. 
    Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
    Outcomes
    10                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
    Can apply the normal distribution, Central limit theorem, and binomial distribution to practical problems with 100% accuracy. Can apply the normal distribution, Central limit theorem, and binomial distribution to practical problems with at least 80% accuracy. Can apply the normal distribution, Central limit theorem, and binomial distribution to practical problems with less than 80% accuracy. Makes no attempt to apply the normal distribution, Central Limit Theorem, or binomial distribution. 
    Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
    Outcomes
    4,5,7                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
    Can explain event, simple event, mutually exclusive events, independent events, discrete random variable, continuous random variable, sample,  and population with 100% accuracy. Can explain event, simple event, mutually exclusive events, independent events, discrete random variable, continuous random variable, sample,  and population with at least 80% accuracy. Can explain event, simple event, mutually exclusive events, independent events, discrete random variable, continuous random variable, sample,  and population with less than 80% accuracy. Makes no attempt to explain any of the terms listed. 
    Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
    Outcomes
    1,6                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
    Can explain mean, median, mode, standard deviation, simple probability, and measures of location with 100% accuracy. Can explain mean, median, mode, standard deviation, simple probability, and measures of location with at least 80% accuracy. Can explain mean, median, mode, standard deviation, simple probability, and measures of location with less than 80%  accuracy. Makes no attempt to define any concept. 
    Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
    Outcomes
    1,2,3,8,9                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
    Compute probabilities using addition multiplication, and complement rules and conditional probabilities. Compute statistical quantities for raw and grouped data. Compute probabilities using combinatorics, discrete random variables, and continuous random variables. All must be done with 100% accuracy. Compute probabilities using addition multiplication, and complement rules and conditional probabilities. Compute statistical quantities for raw and grouped data. Compute probabilities using combinatorics, discrete random variables, and continuous random variables. All must be done with at least 80% accuracy. Compute probabilities using addition multiplication, and complement rules and conditional probabilities. Compute statistical quantities for raw and grouped data. Compute probabilities using combinatorics, discrete random variables, and continuous random variables. All are done with less than 80% accuracy. Makes no attempt to compute any of the probabilities or statistics listed. 
    Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
    Outcomes
    7,8                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
    Can apply the concepts of probability and statistics to real-world problems in other disciplines with 100 % accuracy. Can apply the concepts of probability and statistics to real-world problems in other disciplines with at least 80 % accuracy. Can apply the concepts of probability and statistics to real-world problems in other disciplines with less than 80% accuracy. Makes no attempt to apply the concepts to real-world problems. 
    Components                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
    Outcomes
    1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
    Can use a calculator or other computing device to compute statistics with 100% accuracy. Can use a calculator or other computing device to compute statistics with at least 80% accuracy. Can use a calculator or other computing device to compute statistics with less 80% accuracy. Makes no attempt to use any computing device to compute statistics. 

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    Last Updated:7/18/2012 1:02:39 PM