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PK 107 Mathematics in Review
Brown, Forrest S.


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

PK 107 Mathematics in Review

Semester

S1T 2013 DL

Faculty

Brown, Forrest S.

Title

Senior Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

BSEET - DeVry Institute of Technology
MBA - University of Phoenix

Daytime Phone

801-558-1401

Other Phone

801-745-0501

E-Mail

forrest.brown@park.edu

forrest.brown@hill.af.mil

brownfamily09@msn.com

Semester Dates

January 14- March 8

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Prerequisites

None

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Basic College Mathematics, 8th Edition

The required textbook, Basic College Mathematics, 8th Edition, is an e-book, which is included in the required lab fee you paid in addition to the tuition you paid for the course.

If you wish to have a hardcopy version of the text in addition to the e-book you may order it from MBS, the Park online bookstore at http://direct.mbsbooks.com/park.htm.

OPTIONAL:
Hardcopy Text:
Basic College Mathematics, 8th Ed. Text
Authors: Lial, Salzman, Hestwood
Publisher: Addison-Wesley
ISBN: 9780321557124

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Additional Resources:
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
PK 107 Mathematics in Review: A developmental course for the student who needs review and further practice in the basic arithmetic operation needed in pre-algebra and algebra, including calculations involving whole numbers, fractions, and decimals. Elementary geometry and problem-solving techniques will also be covered. VA benefits might not be available for this course. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
My educational philosophy for online courses is based on interactiveness with each student emphasizing lectures, readings, quizzes, dialogues, examinations, internet, videos, web sites and writings. I will engage each student in what is referred to as disputatious learning in order to encourage the lively exploration of ideas, issues and contradictions.  I also believe in the love of learning principle which is where the student aquires a strong desire to learn as much as possible of the specific subject being taught and then develops ways to apply what they are learning to solving everyday problems.

Class Assessment:

Introductions - By the end of the first week of the course submit a short paragraph to introduce yourself, and respond to someone else's introduction

Each week you will have these regular learning activities:

Reading – Read the assigned chapter sections in your textbook

Lecture –
Read the Content Lecture Files contained within the course

Media - View videos, flash files, and PowerPoint presentations

Webliography - Enhance the learning experience with varying presentations and examples of the weekly topics beyond the course lectures, textbook, and MyMathLab

Discussions - Answer one question for each week, and post a response to someone else's answer (graded activity)

Homework - Complete the MyMathLab weekly homework assignment (graded activity)

Quiz - Complete the MyMathLab weekly quiz (graded activity)

Final Exam - Complete the final exam in week 8 (graded activity)

Grading:

Assignment

Possible Points

Total Points

Total %

Introduction 5 pts

5

0.9

Introduction Response

5 pts

5

0.9

Discussion Answer

10 pts each

80

13.7

Discussion Response 5 pts each

40

6.8

Homework 15 pts each

120

20.5

Quiz

20 pts each

160

27.4

Final Exam

175 pts

175

29.9

TOTAL

 

585

 


Letter Grade

Letter

Number of Points

Percentage

A

524 - 585

89.5 - 100%

B

466 - 523

79.5 - 89.4%

C

407 - 465

69.5 - 79.4%

D

349 - 406

59.5 - 69.4%

F

000 - 348

00 - 59.4%

Late Submission of Course Materials:

It is unfair to other students to allow some individuals to submit assignments after the scheduled due date. Therefore, all assignments are expected to be completed by set deadlines. An exception to the rule is a 24 hour extension provided only for thread postings; but using it will mean you will be assessed with a 50% penalty on earned points for the assignment. The only other considerations for allowable late assignments are limited to the following valid list of emergency reasons. Please note even these reasons are only acceptable at the discretion of your instructor.

  • A medical emergency or a serious acute illness. All medical emergencies and illnesses must be verified by a note on letterhead by an M.D., D.O., P.A., or R.N. I will not normally accept a note from other health professionals (e.g., Ph.D., MSW, D.C., Physical Therapist) because their professional functions rarely involve medical emergencies or acute illnesses. I will accept late work for students who can provide evidence of a verified medical emergency (but not acute illness) involving a child, spouse, parent, sibling, or grandparent.
  • An Accident or Police Emergency. I will require an accident report or note on letterhead from an appropriate law enforcement officer to accept late work due to accidents or police emergencies (e.g., assault on student, student taken hostage, detained witness of a crime).
  • Unforeseen Jury or Witness Duty. I will require a note on letterhead from a judge or attorney stating you had no advance notice of duty to accept late work due to jury or witness duty.
  • Unforeseen Military Deployment or Activation. I will require a note on official letterhead from your commanding officer stating you had no advance notice of deployment or activation.
  • Funerals for Immediate Family Member (e.g., parents, siblings, grandparents, aunts/uncles, first cousins). I will require a copy of the obituary or a note from a minister or funeral director.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
Each student is expected to act professionally with every other student and with the faculty member teaching the class.  Inappropriate comments are not allowed to be posted in any part of the online discussions.  Each student should treat everyone else who is taking this course the same way that they expect to be treated in order to maintain a positive learning environment.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

In Week 1 we start the course with a discussion about whole numbers. We will learn how to apply the operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division on them, and the rules for rounding them. We’ll also examine properties of exponents, roots, and the order of operations before we finish the week with solving some application problems.

In Week 2 we'll learn about fractions and mixed numbers. Then we will learn how to find factors so we can write both in lowest terms. We will then be ready to learn how to multiply and divide both fractions and mixed numbers.

In Week 3 we'll be introduced to adding and subtracting like fractions, finding least common multiples, and then adding and subtracting unlike fractions. Using the same procedures we will then add and subtract mixed numbers. We will finish the week by determining order relations with fractions and mixed numbers and using the order of operations with fractions.

In Week 4 we will discover how to read and write decimal numbers, how to round them, and how to add, subtract, multiply, and divide them. We will end the week by learning how to convert fractions to decimals.

In Week 5 we start learning about ratios, rates, and proportions by examining their properties. From there we will begin the task of learning how to convert, compare, and solve application proportion problems.
 
In Week 6 we are introduced to the basics of percent. Processes to be learned this week include converting fractions to percents and percents to fractions; determining a percent proportion that can be used to solve percent problems, and discovering a percent equation that will lead us to find a missing value for a percent application problem. We complete our lesson on percents by learning about simple interest.

In Week 7 our list for learning new information is short. We will learn how to find the perimeter and area of a rectangle and a square, and then apply those concepts to finding the perimeter and area of a composite figure. The remaining time this week should be spent reviewing all we have learned the first six weeks of the term so you will be ready for the final exam that must be completed during Week 8. Only the concepts presented during Weeks 1 - 7 will be on the final exam. You will need to know how to apply all of the operations to whole numbers, fractions, mixed numbers, and decimals. You will need to be able to convert mixed numbers to fractions, and when possible fractions to mixed numbers. You must know how to convert fractions to decimals and decimals to fractions. And finally you need to be able to convert whole numbers and fractions to percents and percents to fractions or whole numbers when possible. You need to be able to round whole numbers and decimal numbers, estimate whole numbers, decimals, and fractions, and simplify fraction to lowest terms. Techniques for solving application problems for whole, decimal, proportion, and percent numbers should be known. And, of course, you will be expected to know how to determine perimeter and area of the rectangle and square.

In Week 8 the new material we cover will NOT be included in the final exam. We'll end this course by giving you a head start into your next mathematics course by learning the properties of negative values. We will cover addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of negative values. We finish up by determining how to graph negative values and determine absolute value. Upon completion of this week's lessons you will be ready to begin learning the subject of Algebra. During this final week of the course you will also complete the proctored Final Exam and the Course Evaluation.

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95-96
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Academic dishonesty includes committing or the attempt to commit cheating, plagiarism, falsifying academic records, and other acts intentionally designed to provide unfair advantage to the students.

Cheating includes, but is not limited to, intentionally giving or receiving unauthorized aid or notes on examinations, papers, laboratory reports, exercises, projects, or class assignments which are intended to be individually completed.  Cheating also includes the unauthorized copying of tests or any other deceit or fraud related to the student's academic conduct.

Falsifying academic records includes, but is not limited to, altering grades or other academic records.

Other acts that constitute academic dishonesty include:

Stealing, manipulating, or interfering with an academic work of another student or faculty member.

Collusion with other students on work to be completed by one student.

Lying to or deceiving a faculty member.

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95
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ALL GRADED WORK FOR THIS COURSE MUST BE YOUR OWN.  YOU ARE NOT TO RECEIVE OUTSIDE ASSISTANCE FROM ANYONE OTHER THAN YOUR INSTRUCTOR.  To further clarify; classmates, spouses, co-workers, tutors, clergy, librarians, friends, relatives, and pets are included as OUTSIDE ASSISTANCE.  PLEASE DO NOT VIOLATE THIS RULE.

When discussion questions request you to answer in your own words, do not copy words from the textbook as your own.  State YOUR understanding of the concept, not the understanding of some other person.  If you are allowed to quote the textbook, or other sources, you must use proper quotation markings and declare the source including web URL address or book page number from which you copied the text.  Not following these rules constitutes plagiarism, and will not be tolerated.  (This means you will not earn points for the assignment, and if the plagiarism does not stop immediately you will FAIL the course.  Additionally, a report of the incidence will be sent to your permanent academic file.)

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.
ONLINE NOTE: Students must participate in an academically related activity on a weekly basis in order to be marked present in an online class. Examples of academically-related activities include but are not limited to: contributing to an online discussion, completing a quiz or exam, completing an assignment, initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a course related question, or using any of the learning management system tools.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 98
ONLINE NOTE: Students must participate in an academically related activity on a weekly basis in order to be marked present in an online class. Examples of academically-related activities include but are not limited to: contributing to an online discussion, completing a quiz or exam, completing an assignment, initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a courserelated question, or using any of the learning management system tools.

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

INCOMPLETE POLICY




Incompletes are NOT a right, but a rare exception that are granted only in the most extraordinary of situations.




If you feel that you will require an incomplete (again, the exception, not the rule), it is your responsibility to contact your instructor BEFORE THE END OF THE COURSE and make this request. In most cases, written third party documentation will be required to support your request. It is at the discretion of the instructor whether an incomplete will be granted and for what length of time it will be granted, with an absolute maximum extension period of 90 days. Furthermore, incomplete grades will be assigned following all the requirements indicated by the Park University Incomplete Policy.




Park University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog




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Three thread posting cautions:







1. Please refrain from posting negative comments in the course threads. Negativism is contagious and is detrimental to everyone's learning experience. If you want to vent about the course, please send me an email with your thoughts.



2. Under no circumstances are you to post answers to the quiz questions in the course threads. Doing so will earn you a 25 point penalty.



3. Answer only ONE Discussion question per week. Answering more than one will not improve your chances of earning more points, and it may rob a classmate of the opportunity to have a question to answer.

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:12/11/2012 10:43:16 AM