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MG 261 Business Law II
Kern, Kathleen


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

MG 261 Business Law II

Semester

S2A 2013 BE

Faculty

Kern, Kathleen

Title

Adjunct Professor

Degrees/Certificates

Georgetown University Law Center, Juris Doctor
University of Houston, Bachelor of Science (Sociology & Psychology)

Office Location

Austin Campus

Office Hours

By appointment

Daytime Phone

512-909-3247

E-Mail

Kerrie.Kern@park.edu

Kern.ParkU@gmail.com

Semester Dates

March 18, 2013 - May 12, 2013.

Class Days

--T-R--

Class Time

5:10 - 7:50 PM

Prerequisites

MG 260

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
Business Law: The Ethical, Global, and E-Commerce Environment. 15th edition. Mallor, Barnes, Bowers, and Langvardt. 2012. ISBN: 0073524980 

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

PROCEDURE FOR WRITING A TERM PAPER
Alton L. Raygor (2007) < http://www.ucc.vt.edu/stdysk/termpapr.html > [1/14/2013]
A term (or research) paper is primarily a record of intelligent reading in several sources on a particular subject. The task of writing such is not as formidable as it seems if it is thought out in advance as a definite procedure with systematic perpetration.

How To Write A Term Paper

TEN STEPS FOR WRITING RESEARCH PAPERS
American University, Academic Support Center, Writing Lab (2009) < http://www.american.edu/ocl/asc/upload/ten-steps-for-writing-research-papers.pdf > [1/14/2013]
There are ten steps involved in writing a research paper: Step 1: Select a subject Step 2: Narrow the topic Step 3: State the tentative objective (or thesis) Step 4: Form a preliminary bibliography Step 5: Prepare a working outline Step 6: Start taking notes Step 7: Outline the paper Step 8: Write a rough draft Step 9: Edit your paper Step 10: Write the final draft

How To Write A Term Paper

Paper Writing - Brief Overview (I just got assigned a paper, now what?)
Kristina Blasen (2012) < http://www.sophia.org/paper-writing-brief-overview-i-just-got-assigned-a-tutorial > [1/15/2013]
The writing process involves choosing a topic, researching the topic and creating a Venn diagram on the topic. Once the choice of topic has been finalized, you will then need to write an outline. The next part of the process is writing the actual paper with an introduction, body and conclusion. The last part of the writing process is editing and revision.

How To Write A Term Paper

Six Simple Steps for Writing a Research Paper
Potsdam University, Writing Center (2013) < http://www.potsdam.edu/support/cwc/upload/6-simple-steps-for-writing-a-research-paper.pdf > [1/14/2013]
Paper Sometimes the most difficult part of writing a research paper is just getting it started. Contained in this packet, you will find a list of six steps that will aid you in the research paper writing process. You may develop your own steps or procedures as you progress in your writing career; these steps are just to help you begin.

How To Write A Term Paper

Primary and secondary sources
Ithaca College Library, rgilmour (2013) < http://www.ithacalibrary.com/sp/subjects/primary > [1/15/2013]
For some research projects, it is important (or you may be required) to use primary sources, instead of or in addition to secondary sources. So what's the difference?

Primary & Secondary Sources

Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Sources
User Education Services, University of Maryland Libraries (2013) < http://www.lib.umd.edu/ues/guides/primary-sources > [1/15/2013]
s you conduct research, you will consult different sources of information. A professor may request primary, secondary, or tertiary sources. What does that mean? This guide explains these terms and gives examples for each category.

Primary & Secondary Sources

Paper Writing - Research paper – Research techniques
Kristina Blasen (2012) < http://www.sophia.org/paper-writing-research-paper-research-techniques-tutorial > [1/15/2013]
Research papers require scholarly sources and a list of references or a bibliography. A variety of scholarly sources should be used to inform the opinions and arguments that you present in your research paper.

Primary & Secondary Sources

Internet Detective
Paul Smith (2009) < http://www.vtstutorials.ac.uk/detective/ > [1/27/2013]
Use this free Internet tutorial to learn to discern the good, the bad and the ugly for your online research.

Primary & Secondary Sources

How to write an Outline for a Paper
M. Payne, John B. Cade Library, Reference Department (2008) < http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&ved=0CDsQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.lib.subr.edu%2Fdemo%2FPDF%2FHow%2520to%2520write%2520an%2520Outline%2520for%2520a%2520Paper.pdf&ei=Nvv0UJuEFcLu2gWBzoDADg&usg=AFQjCNHwOmu0gIvk > [1/15/2013]
What is an outline? An outline can be defined as an organizational plan to help you draft a paper. Writing an outline before beginning a paper is the most effective way to organize your thoughts. An outline breaks down the parts of your thesis in a clear, hierarchical manner to help you see the overall format of your paper.

How to Write An Outline

How to Write an Outline
Marion Cushman, Los Angeles City College Library (2001) < http://www.lavc.edu/library/outline.htm > [1/15/2013]
An outline is a general plan of the material that is to be presented in a speech or a paper. The outline shows the order of the various topics, the relative importance of each, and the relationship between the various parts.

How to Write An Outline

Do I really have to write an outline to write a good paper? YES.
Kristina Blasen (2012) < http://www.sophia.org/paper-writing-outlines-tutorial > [1/15/2013]
An outline is your rough "plan" of how you will write your paper. An outline helps you figure out where to start by organizing your thoughts and ideas. Outlining your paper before you start can save you time, both in researching your topic and in writing the actual paper.

How to Write An Outline

Paper Writing - Transitions and Topic sentences
Kristina Blasen (2012) < http://www.sophia.org/paper-writing-transitions-and-topic-sentences-tutorial > [1/15/2013]
Transitional devices are like bridges between parts of your paper. They are cues that help the reader to interpret ideas a paper develops. Transitional devices are words or phrases that help carry a thought from one sentence to another, from one idea to another, or from one paragraph to another. And finally, transitional devices link sentences and paragraphs together smoothly so that there are no abrupt jumps or breaks between ideas.

The Body of the Paper

Paper Writing- Thesis Statements
Kristina Blasen (2012) < http://www.sophia.org/paper-writing-thesis-statements-tutorial > [1/15/2013]
Paper Writing- Thesis Statements 2 positive reviews, 0 negative reviews Report Paper Writing- Thesis Statements Rating: Rating (2) Author: Kristina Blasen (345) Objective: To write a thesis statement for a writing assignment. Share See More How to Write a Thesis Statement Elvis example We've all heard about a mysterious thing called a "thesis statement" that should be somewhere in our paper (kind of like Elvis, it's a mystery), but most people don't really know what it is or how to write one. It sounds daunting, but actually it's really easy. What do you mean I need a “thesis statement”? A thesis statement tells the reader what your paper is about and what the main point of the paper will be - before they read it. Your topic is basically what your paper will be about, but a thesis statement requires more detail.

The Body of the Paper

Paper Writing - Introduction/Body/Conclusion
Kristina Blasen (2012) < http://www.sophia.org/paper-writing-introductionbodyconclusion-tutorial > [1/15/2013]
To go over the writing process and describe how to write an introduction, body and conclusion for a paper.

The Body of the Paper

Research Paper – MLA Style
Kristina Blasen (2012) < http://www.sophia.org/research-paper-mla-style--2-tutorial > [1/15/2013]
How to write a paper using MLA style and how to cite references using MLA style.

Citation and Reference Page

Research Paper – APA Style
Kristina Blasen (2012) < http://www.sophia.org/research-paper-apa-style--2-tutorial > [1/15/2013]
How to write a paper using APA style and how to cite references using APA style.

Citation and Reference Page

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
MG261 Business Law II: A continuation of the study of contract, agency, employment, and negotiable instruments; comparison of social responsibility and legal aspects of selected issues.3:0:3 Prerequisite: MG 260 °@

Educational Philosophy:
The facilitator’s educational philosophy is one of interactiveness based on lectures, readings, quizzes, written asyncronous discussion, examinations, websites and writings. The facilitator will engage learners each week in what is referred to as disputatious learning to encourage the exploration of ideas, issues and contradictions.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe the relationship between agent and principal
  2. Distinguish between the rights and liabilities of business owners, whether partners, members or shareholders.
  3. Discuss the most commons forms of bankruptcy.
  4. Describe how employment laws protect employees and impose duties on employers.
  5. Define and give examples of types of intellectual property.
  6. Identify and describe some of the consumer protection laws.
  7. Identify areas where the internet has affected the law as it relates to contracting, employment and intellectual property.


Core Assessment:
All Park University courses must include a core assessment that measures the course's Core Learning Outcomes. The purpose of this assessment is to determine if expectations have been met concerning mastery of learning outcomes across all instructional modalities. 

 For this course, the core assessment is a Comprehensive Final Examination to be administered in all sections of MG 261. This exam is worth at least 30 percent of the student's final grade and will test students' mastery of the Core Learning Outcomes (as listed on this syllabus) through definitions, essay, and/or multiple choice questions. 

 This core assessment is a CLOSED BOOK, CLOSED NOTES comprehensive examination that must be administered and proctored in the classroom and is not to be given as a take-home examination. Students should not have access to the exam or its questions before it is administered. The duration of the exam can be no longer than two hours. 

 No computers, or materials other than a writing instrument and a calculator without text functions and communication may be used for the exam; this applies to all students, regardless of whether the exam is for on-line or face-to-face students. Completion of the exam is strictly individual; students may not work in groups to complete the exam.

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:

Class Assessment will be based on:


Class Discussion

Online Activities (2)

Essay Preparation Writing (3)

Quizzes (5)

Midterm Exam (1)

Final Exam (1)

Term Paper (1)

Class Participation

 

Grading:

My goal is to give you prompt, clear, and useful feedback to help you learn about business law. Each student is responsible for:

    • Completing Weekly Reading Assignments.
    • Participating in weekly Class Discussions.
    • Completing weekly Writing Assignments.
    • Completing Online Activities (3).
    • Completing Quizzes as scheduled.
    • Completing the Mid-Term Exam.
    • Completing a Substantial Writing Assignment, Referred to as a Term Paper.
    • Completing a course evaluation in Week Eight of this class.
    • Completing the Comprehensive Final Exam.

Please note when assignments are due.

Activity

 

Points

Discussion (1)

 

50

Activities (2)

25 each

50

Essay Prep (3)

See indiv.

100

Quizzes (5)

40 each

200

Midterm Exam

 

150

Final Exam

 

200

Term Paper

 

100

Class Participation

 

150

 

TOTAL

1000


  • Please read the Grading Rubric for each assignment located below under additional information.
  • A message from the Park Management Department: "The comprehensive final is not a take-home test.  The comprehensive final is a closed book and closed notes exam."

    **Note:  The final is the core assessment.


Course Grading Scale

100-90%          1000-900 points= A

89-80%             899.9-800 points = B

79-70%             799.9-700 points = C

69-60%             699.9-600 points = D

59% or less      599.9 points or less= F

Total possible points: 1000

The course grade for students will be based on the overall average of homework and tests taken during the course in accordance with the weighting of the various requirements as stated in the syllabus.

All final exams in all School of Business courses will be comprehensive and will be closed book and closed notes. They will constitute 30% of the total course grade and will not be a take-home exam. They will be completed during the test week in the period designated by the registrar or by the Proctor in the case online courses. If calculators are allowed, they will not be multifunctional electronic devices that include features such as: phones, cameras, instant messaging, pagers, and so forth. Electronic Computers will not be allowed on final exams unless an exception is made by the Dean of the School of Business.

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Mid-Term: The Mid-Term will be administered IN CLASS on Tuesday, April 9. You can only take the Mid-Term late with my permission. I will only give permission for an excused emergency (hospitalization or deployment, for example).

 

Final Exam: The Final Exam will be administered IN CLASS on Thursday, May 9.  You can only take the Mid-Term late with my permission. I will only give permission for an excused emergency (hospitalization or deployment, for example). Taking the final late could result in a grade of incomplete for the class. IF YOU DO NOT TAKE THE FINAL, YOU FAIL THE COURSE according to Park policy even if you have a D going into the final.   

Papers: All written work has a deadline of Sunday @ 11:59 pm Central Standard Time (CST). All written work is to be submitted in the online DROPBOX (in .doc or .pdf format) by the dates listed in the syllabus.  If it  due @ 11:59 pm, it is LATE at 12:00 am (midnight).  (In the event you advise me in advance of your inability to submit an assignment by DROPBOX, you may submit it printed, in final form, before class on the Thursday PRIOR to the listed deadline for "on-time" grading.) Written work will be accepted late with the following point deductions: 

The paper will be minus one letter grade (10%) if received in the DROPBOX between Monday @12:00 am and Wednesday @11:59 pm (up to 3 days late).

The paper will be minus two letter grades (20%) if received in the DROPBOX between Thursday @12:00 am and Saturday @11:59 pm (up to 6 days late).

  The paper will not be accepted on or after 12:00 am of the following Sunday (7 days late). No grade will be received.

Quizzes: Quizzes will be "open" to take online from Thursday @ 8:00 pm until Wednesday @ 11:59 pm.  You may take these quizzes anytime during the "open" period.  Late quizzes will not be accepted.  Keep in mind that you may become busy, ill, or unable to use your computer, if you wait until the last day or two.  


Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Attendance/Participation:

Class participation is expected and will form a significant part of the final grade.  Students are expected to come to class prepared and to be on time. Attendance will be taken each class meeting.  Students are expected to engage in class discussions and remain in class for the entire period.

If a student must leave a class early, it should be approved by the instructor, in advance of the applicable class.  Any class time missed will be proportionately subtracted from the students class participation grade. Students that miss more than 30 minutes of any class, due to tardiness, may be marked absent for that class period.  Students that come late and leave early will have their attendance/participation grades reduced proportionately.  

Classes missed for legitimate reasons, such as illness, temporary duty, are excusable; however, the student must contact the instructor in advance of the absence. UNLESS THE ABSENCE IS EXCUSED AND LASTS A WEEK OR MORE, ALL CLASS DEADLINES WILL REMAIN THE SAME.  Each student is responsible for providing the justification for an unexcused absence.  Two or more unexcused absences are excessive and could result in a failing grade for the course.
 
Interaction:

A successful class requires class participation.  For comfortable class participation, all students must feel respected and safe.  Accordingly, while opinions on the subject matter discussed may be heart-felt, and diverse, all student interaction shall maintain a polite and respectful tone, and be conversational, not confrontational, in manner and approach.

Students who are disruptive, abusive, rude or unruly towards any student, guest, or faculty will be removed from the class.  Rude conduct towards the class and instructor includes: disruptive chattering, doing homework, reading a book or material other than the text, sleeping, excessive texting, browsing the internet, Facebooking, or repeatedly leaving class to answer phone calls. 

Students who spend a noticeable amount of time in class doing any of the above non-class-oriented activities, even if NOT disruptive, will receive deductions from their class participation grade.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

ASSIGNMENT

METHOD

DESCRIPTION

DUE

Points

Done


Discussion

Online

Discussion of Videos

March 21 @11:59 pm

50

 

Activity

Online

Re: References

March 24 @11:59 pm

25

 

Quiz #1

Online

Ch. 35 & 36

March 27 @11:59 pm

40

 

Essay Prep #1

Dropbox

Topic

March 31 @ 11:59 pm

30

 

Quiz #2

Online

Ch. 37-38, 41

April 3 @ 11:59 pm

40

 

Optional Review

Online 

Quiz Ch. 42-44

April 7 @ 11:59 pm

0

 

Midterm Exam

In Class

Ch. 35-38, 41-44

April 9, 2013

150

 

Essay Prep #2

Dropbox

Outline

April 14 @ 11:59 pm

35

 

Quiz #3

Online

Ch. 28-30

April 17 @ 11:59 pm

40

 

Activity

Online

Re: References

April 21 @ 11:59 pm

25

 

Quiz #4

Online

Ch. 51-52

April 24 @ 11:59 pm

40

 

Essay Prep #3

Dropbox

References

April 28 @ 11:59 pm

35

 

Quiz #5

Online

Ch. 31-33

May 1 @ 11:59 pm

40

 

Term Paper

Dropbox

Completed Paper

May 5 @ 11:59 pm

100

 

Exam Review

In Class

 

May 7, 2013

0

 

Optional Review

Online 

Quiz Ch. 8, 46, 48

May 8 @ 11:59 pm

0

 

Final Exam

In Class

Ch. 8, 28-30, 31-33, 35-38, 41-44, 46-48 50-52.

May 9, 2013

200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class Participation

In Class

Attendance & Activity

 

150

 

 

 

 

Total Points

1000

 



All written work is to be submitted in the online DROPBOX (in .doc or .pdf format) by the dates listed in the syllabus.

__________________________________________________________

Week 1: Agency Law - March 19 & 22, 2013


Chapter and Topics: Chapters 35, 36

Assignments: 

  Review Selected Videos

  Discussion: Complete ONLINE discussion by Wednesday, March 21 @ 11:59 pm.

  Activity:  Complete ONLINE activity by Sunday, March 24 @ 11:59 pm.

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 2: Introduction to the Forms of Business - March 26 & 28, 2013


Chapter and Topics: Chapters 37, 38, and 41.

Assignments: 

  Quiz 1: Complete ONLINE by Wednesday, March 27 @ 11:59 pm.

  Essay Prep 1 (Topic): Due in DROPBOX by Sunday, March 31 @ 11:59pm

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 3: The Management of Corporations - April 2 & 4, 2013


Chapter and Topics: Chapters 42-44.

Assignments: 

  Quiz 2: Complete ONLINE by Wednesday, April 3@ 11:59 pm.

  Optional Review Quiz: available ONLINE until Sunday, April 7 @ 11:59 pm

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 4: Secured Transactions and Bankruptcy - April 9 & 11, 2013


Chapter and Topics: Chapters 28-30.

Assignments: 

  MidTerm: Complete IN CLASS on Tuesday, April 9.

  Essay Prep 2 (Outline): Due in DROPBOX by Sunday, April 14 @ 11:59 pm

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 5: Employment and Environmental Law - April 16 & 18, 2013


Chapter and Topics: Chapters 51 and 52.

Assignments: 

  Quiz 3: Complete ONLINE by Wednesday, April 17 @ 11:59 pm.

  Activity:  Complete ONLINE activity by Sunday, April 21 @ 11:59 pm.

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 6: Negotiable Instruments - April 23 & 25, 2013


Chapter and Topics: Chapters 31, 32 (pages 840-846), and 33.

Assignments: 

  Quiz 4 Complete ONLINE by Wednesday, April 24 @ 11:59 pm.

  Essay Prep 3 (References): Due in DROPBOX by Sunday, April 28 @ 11:59pm

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 7: Consumer Protection, Accountant Liability,

and Intellectual Property - April 30 & May 2, 2013


Chapter and Topics: Chapters 8 (pages 256-299), 46 and 48.

Assignments: 

  Quiz 5 Complete ONLINE by Wednesday, May 1 @ 11:59 pm.

  Completed Term Paper:  Due in DROPBOX by Sunday, May 5 @ 11:59pm

 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Week 8: Review and IN CLASS Final Examination - May 7 & 9, 2013


Chapter and Topics: Assigned chapters. Review lectures. Review quizzes

Assignments: 

  Exam Review: will be in class on May 7, 2013.

  Optional Review Quiz: available ONLINE until Wednesday, May 8 @ 11:59 pm

  Comprehensive Final Exam: will be in class on May 9, 2013.

__________________________________________________________




 


Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog Page 97
Students are required to do their own work in this course.  Anyone who cheats in any way (including dividing the work with others and submitting their work as your own) will receive an F in the course and be reported to the Academic Director.

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95
Students are required to do their own work in this course. Students who plagiarize will receive a 0 on the assignment for a first offense and will be reported to the Academic Director.  Additional offenses will result in an F in the class.

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog Page 98

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:




Please note that the grading rubrics for this course will be posted in the online course when the course is available to students and are incorporated into the syllabus.  You can access them by clicking on "Grading Rubrics" under Course Home.  PLEASE read them before class starts.

Bibliography:



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
Describe the relationship between agent and principal.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Thoroughly describes the relationship, clearly stating the distinctions between agent and principal. Describes succinctly and clearly the relation. Does not clearly describe or distinguish between the two parties. No response or no pertinent information related to agent-principal relations. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
8. Identify areas where the internet has affected the law as it relates to contracting, employment and intellectual property.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Identifies, describes, and provides examples of how law impacts contracting, employment, and intellectual property protection. Identifies, describes, and provides examples of how law impacts contracting, employment, and intellectual property protection. Does not clearly identify areas. No response or no pertinent information related to agent-principal relations. 
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
Identify and describe some of the consumer protection laws.Examine the types of business associations.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Identifies and describes many (more than four) consumer protection laws.



States and describes several types of business associations and provides a thorough description of each type.







 
Identifies and describes at least two areas.



Identifies and discusses two types of business associations.



 
Does not clearly identify two or more laws.







Does not identify and examine at least two types of business associations.



 
No response or no pertinent information related to consumer protection laws.



No response or no pertinent information related to business associations.



 
Terminology                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
Examine the types of business associations.Define and give examples of types of intellectual property.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
States and describes several types of business associations and provides a thorough description of each type.



Clearly define each type of intellectual property and submit examples.



 
Identifies and discusses two types of business associations.



Provides a simple, clear definition of two types of intellectual property.



 
Does not identify and examine at least two types of business associations. No response or no pertinent information related to business associations. 
Concepts                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
Describe how employment laws protect employees and impose duties on employers.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
Provide a description and a thorough explanation based on three or more laws.. Describes and provides an explanation for two basic employment laws. Does not identify and examine at least two types of basic employment laws. No response or no pertinent information related to business associations. 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
4. Discuss the most commons forms of bankruptcy.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
Identify  and provide a thorough discussion of  three or more forms. Identifies and discusses the use of two forms of bankruptcy. Does not identify and examine at least two types of bankruptcy. No response or no pertinent information related to business associations. 
Whole Artifact                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
Outcomes
Describe how employment laws protect employees and impose duties on employers.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
Provides a thorough , and comprehensive description and explanation of the impact of three or more laws and the outcome on employment practices. Provides a description and a general explanation of how employment laws protect employees and affect employers. Does not provide a description of the ways employment laws affect employees and emplyers. No response or no pertinent information related to business associations. 

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Last Updated:2/21/2013 12:31:49 PM