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SO 308 Prin of Social Research
Dailey, Keith M.


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

SO 308 Prin of Social Research

Semester

S1R 2013 SC

Faculty

Dailey, Keith M.

Title

Campus Center Director / Adjunct Instructor

Degrees/Certificates

PhD Candidate - Adult Education and Leadership
MBA – Human Resources Management
BS - Management

Office Location

Bldg 1650, Rm 79

Office Hours

By appointment

Daytime Phone

915-526-1723

E-Mail

kdailey@park.edu

Semester Dates

January 14 - March 10, 2013

Class Days

------S

Class Time

8:00 - 1:00 PM

Prerequisites

An introductory social science class (i.e. SO141, PS101, CJ100 or SW205) and SO307 or equivalent

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

Understanding Research / Edition 1 by W. Lawrence Neuman; ISBN-13:
9780205471539

Textbooks can be purchased through the MBS bookstore

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association 6th edition. ISBN: 781433805615 (Make sure it is the 4th printing or newest printing)

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
SO 308 Principles of Social Research: An application of the scientific method to social science with the focus on hypothesis formulation, research design, data collection and data analysis. Replication of research studies or completion of a research problem, or both. 3:0:3 Prerequisite: SO307

Educational Philosophy:

Learning is centered on the student therefore all activities focus on course outcomes with the student is responsible for learning those outcomes.

The instructor is responsible for presenting the course learning objectives in an environment conducive to learning along with clarifying and /or elaborating on those outcomes.  Further, the instructor must guide the student to an understanding of concepts and the application of theories presented in the course.

Students will have the opportunity to articulate their knowledge of course outcomes by building a student portfolio, posting responses, participating in group discussions, and other forms of evaluation.

  Instructor Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe and illustrate each step in the research cycle, both for laboratory and field research; and discriminate among the choices that must be made at each stage. [core assessment, final exam]
  2. Apply the principles of the scientific method to social science research. [data analysis, core assessment, final exam]
  3. Operationalize a theoretical question or practical concern as a testable hypothesis. [data analysis, core assessment]
  4. Critically analyze and evaluate a research literature and then to build new research upon the foundation it provides. [literature review, core assessment]
  5. Apply the fundamental aspects of measurement and construct variables based on those principles. [data analysis, core assessment, final exam]
  6. Identify and differentiate basic research designs and determine which is appropriate for a given research problem. [data analysis, core assessment, final exam]
  7. Identify the principles of probabilistic, nonprobabilistic, and multistage samples, and determine which is appropriate for a research problem. [data analysis, core assessment, final exam]
  8. Explain and justify the use of quantitative, qualitative, and multimethod data gathering techniques. [data analysis, core assessment, final exam]
  9. Apply the principles of ethical research. [ethics assignment, core assessment, final exam]
  10. Gather interactive and nonreactive data. [data analysis]
  11. Analyze quantitative and qualitative data. [data analysis, final exam]
  12. Collect, analyze, and critically evaluate empirical data. [data analysis]
  13. Present research results to specific audiences. [data analysis, ethics assignment, core assessment]
Class Assessment:
Week 1: 
    
Reading Assignment #1: Read Chapters 1 and 2 
 
Quiz #1: Chapters 1 and 2
 
Assignment #1: Research Question and Hypothesis. This is an overview of the topic your research will investigate not unlike what will be required of you for the core assessment that is due at the end of the session. This introduces your research question, justifies why your proposed research question is necessary, clearly identifies key variables, and their hypothesized relationship. Your research question must be a sociological topic. Minimum 2 academic references cited to support your statements and the reasoning why research is required.
 
Week 2:

Reading Assignment #2: Read Chapter 12

Assignment #2: Literature Review. In general, before we start a research project, we need to understand what others have done and how they have done it. That helps us decide how to do our own research. For this project find four more academic references to support the references already cited on the topic you selected for assignment #1. Although you may have more, for this assignment you will have a minimum of 6 academic sources for your literature review. Read the articles/books and summarize each one in a few paragraphs including the previous references cited. Think about what other researchers have done and what you would do if you were investigating this topic. Would you replicate what others have done, or break new ground?
 
Week 3:

Reading Assignment #3: Read Chapters 4 and 5
 
Quiz #2: Chapter 4, and 5
 
Assignment #3: Interview. For this project, we will practice talking and listening to people. I want you to find either A: a person who has lived in Illinois for at least 3 years or, B: a person who has moved away from this region for at least 3 years and returned. You should speak with this person for at least an hour about their experiences (why they left or why they like or dislike the area, what they do, what are their plans for the future, who they are, what are their thoughts, concerns, etc.) First, make a list of questions you are interested in asking, but leave room for questions that might come up in the middle of your interview. Either record the interview and turn in the tape/mp3 file or type out the questions you asked and summarize the respondent’s answers. Do not use the respondent’s real name, but do include the socio-demographic information such as age, ethnicity, education, gender, etc. You will need to ask a minimum of 12 questions but do not include the questions you will ask to collect the socio-demographic data. You should analyze your interview to demonstrate what you learned. Do you think your interviewee is typical or not? How many people do you think you would need to talk to understand what is happening with this group? Summary of questions asked and ensuing analysis should be turned in with the consent form.

Week 4:
 
Reading Assignment #4: Read Chapter 3
 
Quiz #3: Chapter 3
 
Assignment #4: Ethical dilemmas/challenges in conducting your proposed research project: You will summarize the potential ethical dilemmas, controversies, consequences, and other practical challenges associated with designing, conducting, implementing, and disseminating your research. Predict and explain where your research process might go wrong and the safeguards you would put into place to minimize those risks.
 
Week 5:

Reading Assignment: Read Chapters 10 
 
Assignment #5: Unobtrusive Research: You are to search the internet for the Uniform Crime Report posted by the FBI. You will search for table 1 which lists the totals for all violent crimes committed in the United States from 1989 to 2011. You will analyze, evaluate the data, identify trends you may see from 1989 to 2011, and make your conclusions about what is happening over all with violent crimes in the United States during this time period. Write about and elaborate in detail your observations and conclusions of the data you have observed, and discuss on how what you have observed and concluded is reflected or not reflected in the media when they discuss violence in America and or cover incidents of violent crimes in the evening news, and in prime time news shows.
 
Week 6:

Reading Assignment: Read Chapters 6, 7, and 8
 
Quiz #4: Chapter 6 and 7
 
Assignment #6: Survey/Questionnaire design and construction: You will construct a survey instrument that can be used to collect data for your research proposal. You will need to decide on a sampling frame and the wording of at least 15 questions. Once your questions have been constructed you will decide on whether they are to be open or closed ended, decide on a format, answer set, and design your own survey instrument. Each of you will turn in a finalized copy of your survey instrument.
 
Week 7:

Reading Assignment: Read Chapters revisit chapter 9 and 12
 
Assignment #7: Design and Procedures (methodology): Describes and justifies your plans for measurement, sampling, design, analysis, and interpretation of results. It explains which data you would collect, when you would collect it, and what you would do with it to make sense of your topic and shed new light on your research question. This section is a set of “how to” instructions for actually turning your “good idea” into a real plan for scientifically answering your original question. You will discuss in detail the type of survey instrument you will be using, and what each questions hopes to measure and how. Also elaborate on how you will collect your sample and the size of the population you propose to study. Your research proposal is a carefully constructed argument for why your question should be answered and how a valid and reliable answer might be obtained. It should be a meticulous set of instructions for generating an answer according to the rules of scientific method, and it should make the case to interested parties for how such an answer can be achieved. 
 
Consent Form Construction: You will construct a consent form for your proposed research project using the guidelines provided to you by me.
 
Week 8:
 
Core Assessment

Research Proposal: The Core Assessment for this class requires you to write a detailed proposal for research you could conduct. You will not actually do this research (though it might form the basis for a senior research project or some research relevant to your job), but your proposal should be a “blueprint” detailed enough that you could hand to others and guide them through its successful completion. The research proposal will consist of four sections:

1.    Problem Statement: An overview of the topic your research will investigate. It introduces and justifies your research question, key variables, their hypothesized relations, and your guiding theoretical perspective. It explains how your planned research is unambiguous in its goals and methods, concerned with a significant issue that will add to the store of human knowledge, theoretically justifiable and testable, practical and feasible to implement, ethical and respectful of human rights, and builds on existing knowledge in the field.

2.    Literature Review: A critical summary of existing research your project will build upon. Your review will evaluate at least six other relevant research projects from original sources in reputable, peer-reviewed journals. The lit review discusses previous research, as it influences the proposed project. It evaluates the methodological, theoretical, or substantive strengths or weaknesses of those studies and explains how they shape your research plans.

3.    Ethics & Conduct of Research: Summarizes potential ethical dilemmas, political consequences, and practical challenges associated with designing, conducting, implementing, and disseminating your research. It explains where your research process might go wrong and the safeguards you will put into place to minimize those risks.

4.    Design & Procedures: Describes and justifies your plans for measurement, sampling, design, analysis, and interpretation of results. It explains which data you would collect, when you would collect it, and what you would do with it to make sense of your topic and shed new light on your research question — and how and why. This section is a set of “how to” instructions for actually turning your “good idea” into a real plan for scientifically answering your original question. You will need to present your survey instrument and what it intends to measure and how. You will also need to include a copy of your survey in the appendix. Your research proposal is a carefully constructed argument for why your question should be answered and how a valid and reliable answer might be obtained. It should be a meticulous set of instructions for generating an answer according to the rules of scientific method, and it should make the case to interested parties for how such an answer can be achieved.

 
 

Grading:

Core Assessment: 200 points
Homework Assignments: 50 points each-total of 350 points
Quizzes: 50 points each-total of 200 points
Consent form: 50 points
In Class participation: 6.25 points per class meeting-toal of 50 points
Final Exam: 150 points

Grading:

Total Possible Points: 1000

A = 900 – 1000
B = 800 – 899
C = 700 – 799
D = 600 – 699
F = 599 or below

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Assignments are considered late if not posted by 11:59pm Saturday of each week within its associated Drop Box in eCompanion.  All assignments turned in late will lose 10% off of its final grade. 

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

 

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Week 1: 
    
Reading Assignment #1
Quiz #1: Chapters 1 and 2
Assignment #1 

Week 2:

Reading Assignment #2
Assignment #2

Week 3:

Reading Assignment #3
Quiz #2: Chapters 4 and 5

Week 4:
 
Reading Assignment #4 
Quiz #3: Chapter 3 
Assignment #4
 
Week 5:

Reading Assignment #5 
Assignment #5
 
Week 6:
 
Reading Assignment #6 
Quiz #4: Chapter 6 and 7
Assignment #6
 
Week 7:

Reading Assignment #7
Assignment #7 
Consent Form 
 
Week 8:
 
Core Assessment
Comprehensive Final Exam
 
All assignments listed above are due No Later Than 11:59pm of the designated week.
 
 

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95-96

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 98

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Copyright:

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Last Updated:12/5/2012 10:24:24 AM