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PA 602 Seminar in Public Affairs
Mathews, Audrey


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Hauptmann School for Public Affairs Mission Statement
The Hauptmann School of Public Affairs offers a citizen-centered, professional program of graduate study that is grounded in the liberal arts tradition.  As participants in HSPA's vibrant academic community, faculty and students consider, with the coursework, the larger issues of democracy, stewardship, and technology.  In so doing, HSPA seeks to prepare students for the courage and discernment to act for the common good in the global context.  Going beyond competence, students develop knowledge, skills, and values requisite for leadership and service in and across all sectors of society, including government, business, and nonprofit.  HSPA cultivates public affairs as a life-long passion that is fundamental to citizenship in a free society.



Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Hauptmann School for Public Affairs Vision Statement
The Hauptmann School for Public Affairs will serve the common good by graduating leaders who exercise authority responsibly, make ethical decisions, act with moral courage, and advance human dignity world-wide.


Course

PA 602 Seminar in Public Affairs

Semester

SPP 2013 DL

Faculty

Mathews, Audrey

Title

Instructor, Master Public Administration - Online

Degrees/Certificates

DPA,Public Administration, Organization Behavior
CALFED's Watershed Educational, Certificate in Watershed Management and Partnerships, 2006
CSUSB, Creative Writing Certificate pending

Office Location

Virtual Office, online

Daytime Phone

909-881-8618

E-Mail

audmathews@aol.com

Audrey.Mathews@park.edu

Semester Dates

Monday, January 14, 2013 - Sunday, May 12, 2013

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: 27 hours academic credit, including completion of PA 501 and 502

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
 

IV.COURSE TEXTS

A.Texts that you already have:

·In Document Sharing: MPA Student Writing Help sheet

·Issues of the scholarly journal, Public Administration Review, as needed (available to each student as a member of the American Society for Public Administration).

·In Document Sharing: Documents published by the Center for Civic Education

B.Available from the web:

·Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (Preamble and Part the First only): http://www.mass.gov/legis/const.htm

·The Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863: http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/emancipation_proclamation/

·President Abraham Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1865. http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/trt053.html;

·Res Publica: An International Framework for Education in Democracy, published by the Center for Civic Education: (Provided in document sharing)

·The Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom: http://www.vahistorical.org/sva2003/vsrf.htm.

·ALSO: The New York Times online (www.nytimes.com); the Wall Street Journal online (www.wsj.com); and the Washington Post online (www.washingtonpost.com). These may require fees for digital subscriptions.

C.Text books:

Guy B. Adams and Danny L. Balfour, Unmasking Administrative Evil. REV04.

            M. E. Sharpe. ISBN # 0-7656-2331-5 (paper).

H. George Frederickson. 2005. Public Administration with an Attitude. Washington, D.C.:

            American Society for Public Administration. 2005. ISBN # 0-936678-24-0.

Terry L. Jordan (ed). The U.S. Constitution and Fascinating Facts about It. Naperville, IL: Oak

            Hill Publishing Company. ISBN # 1-891743-00-7.

Jonathan Kozol,Amazing Grace: The lives of children and the conscience of a nation. Harper

            Perennial Publisher, Reprint edition. 1996. ISBN #: 0060976977

Terrel L. Rhodes, ed., The Public Manager Case Book: Making decisions in a complex world.

            Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2002, ISBN # 0-7619-2327-6 (paper).

Zakaria, Fareed. The Post-American World. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. ISBN #0-393-33480-     5.

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
PA 602 Seminar in Public Affairs: PA 602 is the capstone seminar of the MPA program. Conducted as a graduate seminar, this course addresses correlation of the academic and practical experiences of the degree candidates to their responsibilities as professionals in a democratic society. Each student prepares a series of papers and/or presentations that emphasize various expectations to be faced in professional work, such as case analysis, critique, evaluation, implementation research and proficiency in U.S. Constitutional issues. Prerequisite: 27 hours academic credit, including completion of PA 501 and 502

Educational Philosophy:
: Each person in this class, including the instructor, is a participant in a free and democratic society. The United States is the oldest surviving representative democracy on earth. Faculty in higher education have a responsibility to consider the content of their course and academic discipline within the context of issues related to work in a democracy and associated civic responsibility within a global reality. At the Hauptmann School, we recognize that we are helping to prepare leaders in our democracy and in our world. Further, recognizing that the class is comprised of adult learners, the instructor’s role is to facilitate intelligent and informed discussion of key issues rather than lecturing in a traditional sense.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate the ability to analyze, critique, and evaluate current issues in public affairs;
  2. Communicate one's views clearly and civilly, and offer substantiation for those views;
  3. Demonstrate the ability to articulate and argue opposing sides of issues;
  4. Differentiate between personal beliefs and sound public policy in a pluralistic society.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to write critically and effectively;
  6. Participate productively in teams;
  7. Articulate clearly one's responsibilities as professionals and citizens in a free and democratic society, and in the world.


Core Assessment:

Class Assessment:

V. COURSE ASSESSMENT: Class participation, quality of discussions, presentations, papers, and written reports.

A. Overall Grading Policy:

PA 602 is a writing-intensive course, during which time students will be submitting three reports, two case analyses (in teams), and a class participation analysis, in addition to presenting and writing a Constitutional Debate. Postings on threaded discussions are evaluated according to timeliness and quality.

Grades for the course will be based on student demonstration of the following:

· Understanding of the assigned readings and faculty presentations, evidenced by the ability to analyze and communicate through the different discussion and writing assignments.

· Collaboratively lead and participate in the weekly class discussions.

· Proper use of citations and sources (see ASPA guidelines appended to this syllabus).

· Proper spelling, grammar and punctuation (see MPA Student Writing Helpsheet provided). There is a 2-point grade penalty for every word not spelled correctly as well as for incorrect use of grammar and punctuation.

· Ability to work well in teams.

· NOTE: VIOLATION of Park University’s academic integrity policy will result in an F for the course. See section below on ACADEMIC HONESTY.

WORDS OF ADVICE: This graduate seminar requires dedicated, intelligent participation in the course from the very beginning. Stay ahead with the reading and writing assignments. Reread your written assignments carefully before submission. Do not submit a “first draft” for grading. Ask someone to read your draft before you submit it to be sure it is readable and free of errors. Your best thinking is expected. Remember that there are often no clear answers around policy issues. Be prepared to express your ideas AND the basis for them.

Also, pay close attention to my weekly posted announcements and e-mail messages.

B. Criteria for Evaluating Class Participation: Students are expected to lead and participate in the weekly class threaded discussions by posting constructively, in a timely manner, and by responding to classmates. Postings must be made before the end of the day 10:59pm Pacific Standard Time (PST) on Wednesday in order to be considered timely, allowing time for classmates to respond to your points. All responses in the threaded discussions should be professional in nature. An excellent response is timely and will include a citation from the reading, a personal or professional example which supports your conclusion, and proper use of grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

This is the final seminar in the MPA graduate program and the weekly discussion will be student-led based largely on posts and responses between students. The instructor will read and monitor all discussion and post sporadically depending upon the discussion.

C. Writing Assignments: For all writing assignments, draw on the faculty presentations, readings for the course prior to and including the week’s reading assignment.

Students are expected to adhere to the following standards for all assignment submissions:

1. Standards of academic honestly are expected; violations will not be tolerated.

2. All papers must be word-processed, double-spaced, written in 12-point font, and have standard margins.

3. Papers must contain no misspelled words or grammatical errors.

4. Use proper format for citations and footnotes, as well as quotation marks.

5. Be sure that the organization of the paper clearly follows the assignment. The reader should not have to figure out what item in the assignment is being addressed in that section of the paper.

6. All papers should be carefully edited to insure writing makes sense and is readable. All papers should be edited by at least one outside reader.

7. Reminders: Put the week and assignment at the top of each essay, along with name and the date.

NOTE: Be sure to submit papers in the DROP BOX and or email them to me at Audrey.Mathews@park.edu Assignments will be graded and returned in the DROP BOX or via email depending on how they were submitted.

Grading:

D. Grading Plan:

The following points will be assigned to the course requirements:

1. Weekly Discussion Threads/Class Participation Analysis & Team Report 300 points

Class Participation Analysis one-page Methodology due Week 8; Class Participation Analysis report is an empirical study of weekly class participation and team performance due at the conclusion of Week 17; students recommend the number of points they should earned out of the 300 allotted; see homework for Week 17 for details and requirements.)

2. Three Reports 400 points

· Foundational Values Report (due Week 3) 100 points

· Democratic Role & Responsibility Report (due Week 7) 100 points

· Capstone Seminar Scholarly Reflective Report (due Week 17) 200 points

3. Case Analyses (TEAMS) 100 points

Cases Analyses 1 [TEAM ASSIGNMENT] (week 12) 50 points

Cases analyses 2 [TEAM ASSIGNMENT] (week 13) 50 points

4. Capstone Constitutional Debate Presentation and Narrative 200 points

Debate Statement due for approval Week 8; facilitated presentations consisting of PowerPoint and narrative are scheduled during weeks 14, 15, 16, and 17.

TOTAL 1,000 points

Grading Scale

Final grades will be computed based on the following point scale:
900-1000: A
800-899: B
700-799: C
600-699: D
0-599: F

E. Attendance: Any student who does not participate in class for two weeks without an excused absence will be automatically administratively withdrawn.

Late Submission of Course Materials:

XII. LATE SUBMISSION OF COURSE MATERIALS: Written assignments are submitted during the week they are due. Any assignment received by the instructor after the due date will receive reduced points.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Online Course Policies:

Policy #1: Submission of Work:

  • A class week is defined as the period of time between Friday 11:01 pm PST and Friday at 10:59 PM PST The first week begins the first day of the term/semester. Assignments scheduled for completion during a class week should be completed and successfully submitted by the posted due date.
  • Create a back up file of every piece of work you submit for grading. This will ensure that a computer glitch or a glitch in cyberspace won't erase your efforts.
  • When files are sent attached to an email, the files should be in either Microsoft Word, RTF, ASCII, txt, or PDF file formats.

Policy #2: Ground Rules for Online Communication & Participation

  • General email: Students should use email for private messages to the instructor and other students. When sending email other than assignments, you must identify yourself fully by name and class in all email sent to your instructor and/or other members of our class.
  • Online threaded discussions: are public messages and all writings in this area will be viewable by the entire class or assigned group members.
  • Online Instructor Response Policy: Online Instructors will check email frequently and will respond to course-related questions within 24-48 hours.
  • Observation of "Netiquette": All your Online communications need to be composed with fairness, honesty and tact. Spelling and grammar are very important in an Online course. What you put into an Online course reflects on your level of professionalism. Here are a couple of Online references that discuss writing Online http://goto.intwg.com/ and netiquette http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html.
  • Please check the Announcements area before you ask general course "housekeeping" questions (i.e. how do I submit assignment 3?). If you don't see your question there, then please contact your instructor.

Policy #3: What to do if you experience technical problems or have questions about the Online classroom.

  • If you experience computer difficulties (need help downloading a browser or plug-in, you need help logging into the course, or if you experience any errors or problems while in your Online course, click on the button in your Online Classroom, then click on the helpdesk menu item, and then fill out the form or call the helpdesk for assistance.
  • If the issue is preventing you from submitting or completing any coursework, contact your instructor immediately.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

 

VI. WEEKLY COURSE TOPICS & ASSIGNMENTS

Week 1: WHO WE ARE: Founding Values of the American Democratic Republic

January 14 – January 20, 2013[alm1] 

Reading Assignment

  • MPA Student Writing Helpsheet (in document sharing);
  • Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (Preamble and Part the First only)

· The Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom:http://www.vahistorical.org/sva2003/vsrf.htm.

  • In Jordan: Declaration of Independence

· The Emancipation Proclamation, January 1, 1863: http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featured_documents/emancipation_proclamation/

**Draw on the Founding Documents and faculty presentations in assignments throughout this course.**

Writing Assignments: Respond to questions in the threaded discussions.

WEEK 2: WHO WE ARE (continued)

January 21 – January 27, 2013[alm2] 

Reading Assignments:

1. In Jordan: U.S. Constitution (including the Bill of Rights); documents from the Center for Civic Education, provided here:

2. Res Publica: An International Framework for Education in Democracy, published by the Center for Civic Education (provided in document sharing)

**Draw on the Founding Documents and faculty presentations in assignments throughout this course.

Writing Assignments: Respond to questions in the threaded discussions.

WEEK 3: WHO WE ARE (continued)

January 28 – February 3, 2013[alm3] 

Reading Assignment: MPA Student Writing Help sheet!!

Writing Assignments: Respond to questions in the threaded discussions.

Report Assignment: Write a 5-6 page Foundational Values Report. All writing assignments for this class should be double-spaced, with one inch margins on the top, bottom and sides of each page. Be sure your name, date and course name and number are on each page of the report. Your report must be well-written, spell-checked, with zero typos, proper grammar, complete sentences, proper citations and quoted material. You are expected to carefully edit your writing to insure what you have written not only meets all of these expectations but to be sure your writing makes sense and is readable. Always ask someone else to edit your work. Draw only on the required reading and course content for this assignment. You are not expected to use outside sources for this assignment. Do not exceed the six page limit (your source page should be included within the six pages.)

To receive full credit for this assignment, you must address each of the following questions in a format using the following clearly delineated sections for your report:

  1. Who are we as Americans?
  2. What fundamental values with regard to human dignity are expressed in the Founding Documents, Res Publica, etc.?
  3. What can you draw from these documents as the responsibility of citizens in a democratic society to one another?
  4. The view of government’s role in protecting the common good?
  5. The relationship of citizens to their government and their democracy?

Your Foundational Values Report will be graded using the following criteria:

  1. All of the questions above were sufficiently addressed in clearly delineated sections.
  2. Quality of writing as outlined above.
  3. Critical thinking. Did the student provide sufficient analysis in their answers? Did they offer original ideas?
  4. Questioning of assumptions. Is there evidence that the student questioned their own assumptions concerning the assignment and materials?

DUE: End of week 3 (Sunday by Midnight) in DROP BOX and email.

WEEK 4: Constitutional Responsibility and Public Service

February 3 – February 10, 2013 [alm4] 

Reading Assignment: Complete Frederickson, Public Administration with an Attitude (entire); begin the Kozol book

Writing Assignments: Respond to questions in the threaded discussions.

WEEK 5: Our Responsibility as Professionals in a Democracy

February 11 – 17, 2013[alm5] 

Reading Assignment: Kozol: Amazing Grace (entire)

Writing Assignments: Respond to questions in the threaded discussions.

DEADLINE for submitting Constitutional Debate Statement: End of Week 8.

DEADLINE for submitting Class Participation Analysis Methodology: End of Week 8.

WEEK 6: Our Responsibility as Professionals in a Democracy (con’t)

February 18 – 24, 2013[alm6] 

Reading Assignment: Adams and Balfour, Unmasking Administrative Evil (entire)

Writing Assignments: Respond to questions in the threaded discussions.

DEADLINE for submitting Constitutional Issue Debate Statement: End of Week 8.

DEADLINE for submitting Class Participation Analysis Methodology: End of Week 8.

WEEK 7: Our Responsibility as Professionals in a Democracy (con’t)

February 25– March 3, 2013

Reading Assignment: MPA Student Writing Help sheet!!

Writing Assignments: Respond to questions in the threaded discussions.

Report Assignment One: Democratic Role and Responsibility Report. Write a 5-6 page Democratic Role and Responsibility Report. All writing assignments for this class should be double-spaced, with one inch margins on the top, bottom and sides of each page. Be sure your name, date and course name and number are on each page of the report. Your report must be well-written, spell-checked, with zero typos, proper grammar, complete sentences, proper citations and quoted material. You are expected to carefully edit your writing to insure what you have written not only meets all of these expectations but to be sure your writing makes sense and is readable. Always ask someone else to edit your work. Draw only on the required reading and course content for this assignment including the Founding Documents. You are not expected to use outside sources for this assignment. Do not exceed the six page limit (your source page should be included within the six pages.)

To receive full credit for this assignment, you must address each of the following questions in a format using the following clearly delineated sections for your report:

  1. Who/what bears responsibility for the situations of the children in the South Bronx that Kozol described?
  2. What is your basis for designating such/any/no responsibility?
  3. What might be some consequences of inaction and who might bear them?
  4. What (if any) is your role as a citizen in a free society, as well as a professional in a democracy, to young citizens and others similarly situated, and the basis for your determination?

Your Democratic Role and Responsibility Report will be graded using the following criteria:

  1. All of the questions above were sufficiently addressed in clearly delineated sections.
  2. Quality of writing as outlined above.
  3. Critical thinking. Did the student provide sufficient analysis in their answers? Did they offer original ideas?
  4. Questioning of assumptions. Is there evidence that the student questioned their own assumptions concerning the assignment and materials?

DUE: End of Week 7 (Sunday by 11:59 PM (PCT)) in DROP BOX and email.

Writing Assignment Two: Constitutional Debate Statement. Due at the End of week 8 at Midnight.

The Capstone Constitutional Debate Presentation and Narrative is the most important assignment in this course. See Week 13 for a complete description of this assignment and grading rubric. This assignment will ask you to choose a Constitutional issue and create and present arguments on both sides (affirmative and negative) of the case. Your fellow classmates should not be able to detect your actual position on the issue until you reveal it during the discussion later in the week.

By the end of Week 8 (Sunday by Midnight) you will submit (via e-mail) one statement—one sentence—that will be the focus of your research and debate presentation. You will receive feedback on your Constitutional Debate Statement and a portion of this assignment will count toward your final grade for this assignment.

Drafting the debate statement can be confusing for students, so here are examples of poor and good Constitutional Debate statements with comments:

Poor Statement: Prayer in Schools is Constitutional.

Comments: While this is one sentence with two opposing sides are assumed (in the affirmative and negative) but the statement invites arguments to be muddled. What kind of schools are you referring to? What kind of prayer? Which section of the Constitution are you referencing? More specificity is better.

Here is an improved version of this same statement:

Good Statement: Student-led prayer in public schools is protected by the free exercise clause of the First Amendment.

What you don’t want to do is submit is a general topic, such as: I will research unlawful search and seizures. This is not a debatable sentence and does not contain opposing arguments.

WEEK 8: Decision Making: How Organizations Go Awry

March 4 – March 10, 2013[alm7]  Reading Assignment: Zakaria, The Post-American World (entire)

Writing Assignments: Respond to questions in ALL THREE threaded discussions.

Writing Assignment One: Compose and submit (via email) a Constitutional Issue Debate Statement by the end of Week 8 (Sunday by Midnight). See Writing Assignment Two: Constitutional Debate Statement in Week 7’s Writing Assignments above for more details.

Writing Assignment Two: Class Participation Analysis Methodology. By the end of Week 8 (Sunday by 11:59 PM (PCT) compose and submit (via email) a one-page overview of how you will analyze your class participation for your Class Participation Analysis and Team Report due at the conclusion of Week 17. (See Week 17 below for more details about the Class Participation Analysis and Team Report.) You are required to treat the course discussion very seriously. Consequently, the Class Participation Analysis and Team Report assignment should be treated as a major research project that utilizes raw data. In this case, the raw data you will utilize is the content from your weekly discussion thread participation. Therefore, by the conclusion of Week 8, you will need to provide an overview of how you intend to empirically analyze this data to evaluate your overall performance in your weekly class participation. For example, will you use a formula for quantifying each of your posted threads assigning points values based on: frequency of weekly threads; timeliness; quality; level of professionalism; reference to weekly readings; etc.? There are a number of ways you can assess your class participation and the purpose of this one-page assignment is to force you to establish a scientific method of analysis. The Class Participation Analysis and Team Report assignment is worth a total of 300 points so it is worth more than any assignment due in this course. It is imperative that you plan carefully and in advance for this assignment. You will receive feedback on your approach to your analysis and a portion of this assignment will count toward your final grade for this assignment. While you are not required to analyze your classmates’ class participation, you also have full access to all of your classmates’ class participation (also raw data) via the weekly discussion boards up to this point so you can review and compare your performance with theirs. This can give you a sense of how you effective you are compared to them.

Remember to be a leader in the weekly discussion. This is the final seminar in the MPA graduate program and the weekly discussion will be student-led based largely on posts and responses between students. The instructor will read and monitor all discussion and post sporadically depending upon the discussion.

Week 9: TERM BREAK!

March 11 – March 17, 2013[alm8] 

WEEK 10: The Post-American World

March 18 – March 24, 2013[alm9] 

Reading Assignment: Complete Zakaria's The Post-American World. Begin reading the Public Management Casebook.

Writing Assignments: Complete discussion.

Case Analysis Presentations Groupwork: You will receive communications with details regarding being assigned to two separate small groups to prepare for two separate Case Analysis Presentations during Weeks 12 and 13. Each member of the class is responsible for TWO different case analysis presentations, each time as part of a team. Each class member is randomly assigned to the cases and teams. There are five cases, and each team makes a separate presentation. Presentations consist of a PowerPoint presentation accompanied by a detailed narrative, which are facilitated by team members in discussion threads. Each case analysis and presentation is a TEAM product, and everyone receives the same grade.

The presentations will focus on readings in the Rhodes’ text (The Public Manager Case Book). All of the details and requirements (The Case Format, Case Presentations and Tips) concerning these case presentations are available below in Week 11 and 12 and in the online course. Beginning this week (Week 10), you will have the opportunity to begin working in your small groups (via the discussion threads) to begin preparations for the Week 12 group assignment. Beginning next week (Week 11), you will have the opportunity to begin working in your small groups (again via the discussion threads) to begin preparations for the Week 13 case. This will facilitate your team discussions for planning your case analysis presentations. You may also talk via email, as well.

WEEK 11: Issues with Implementing our Democracy

March 25 – March 31, 2013

Reading Assignment: Cases in Rhodes, The Public Manager Case Book: Making decisions in a complex world.

  • Thompson and Rassel:Balancing the Budget in Gaston County, North Carolina”
  • Brown, “Emergency Management at the Millennium”
  • Rassel, “Ending Welfare As We Know It”

Beginning with Week 12 and throughout the rest of the course, the format of our weekly sessions will change dramatically. They will shift from looking at new concepts and material to centering on student presentations, focusing on groupwork, analysis, integration and application.

Writing Assignments: Respond to questions in the threaded discussions.

Case Analysis Presentations Groupwork/TEAM writing assignment: Work in your assigned teams to prepare case analysis presentations (PowerPoint AND narrative) for next week. Arrange assignments among teammates.

Each member of the class is responsible for TWO different case analysis presentations, each time as part of a team one in Week 12 and the other in Week 13. Each class member is randomly assigned to the cases and teams. There are five total cases, and each team makes a separate presentation. Presentations consist of a PowerPoint presentation accompanied by a detailed narrative, which are facilitated by team members in discussion threads. Each case analysis and presentation is a TEAM product, and everyone receives the same grade. Each team member is asked to submit the presentation and narrative in the Dropbox so that the grade can be assigned to each individual in the grade book. Team members will evaluate the performance of individual team mates in the Class Participation Analysis and Team Report (due in Week 17) for this course; team evaluations are taken very seriously in calculating the final grade in this course.

Each case analysis presentation should cover the points listed in the Case Analysis Format below and in the online course.

All writing assignments for this class should be double-spaced, with one inch margins on the top, bottom and sides of each page. Be sure your name, date and course name and number are on each page of the narrative. Your narrative must be well-written, spell-checked, with zero typos, proper grammar, complete sentences, proper citations and quoted material. Your team is expected to carefully edit your writing to insure what you have written not only met all of these expectations but to be sure your writing makes sense and is readable. Always ask someone else to edit your work.

Weeks 11 and 12 will contain discussion threads for each group to facilitate your team discussions for planning your case analysis presentations. You may also talk via email, as well.

At the beginning of Weeks 12 and 13 your group’s PowerPoint presentation and narrative will be posted in a thread and members of your group are expected to lead the group discussion. Everyone in the class is expected to respond, discuss each presentation, ask questions and raise additional points to perhaps improve the analysis. The presenting team is responsible for facilitating the discussion, responding to points and questions related to the presentation. All team members must participate in their own team discussion as well as the other discussions that week. The presentation and discussion will be graded. The grade given to the team is the grade that each individual receives.

The cases for Week 12 are as follows:

1. Week 12-Group 1: Budget Group

Case: Thompson and Rassel, “Balancing the Budget in Gaston County, North Carolina.” Pages 1-12. Submit by Saturday  10:59 PM (PST)of Week 11 for posting Week 12.

2. Week 12-Group 2: Emergency Management Group

Case: Brown: “Emergency Management at the Millennium.” Pages 13-36. Submit by Saturday of Week 11 10:59 PM (PST) for posting Week 12.

3. Week 12-Group 3: Welfare Group

Case: Rassel, “Ending Welfare As We Know It.” Pages 51-72. Submit by Saturday of Week 11 10:59 PM (PST) for posting Week 12.

Case Analysis Format

Adhere to the following format in writing your narratives and presenting your team case analyses. To receive full credit for this assignment, your team must address each of the following points:

  1. The PowerPoint should serve as a summary of your narrative but should be in an outline format and not just a repeat of your narrative.
  2. The narrative should be no more than six pages (including your source page), which will be a challenge requiring you to prioritize what is most important.
  3. The length of each response to the questions above should be left up to the group’s best judgment as long as it covers the question.
  4. The length of the PowerPoint is up to the group to determine. The best PowerPoints are not text-heavy but should be simple, clean and easy to read using photos, graphics and illustrations.
  5. In two or three sentences, what is the subject matter of this case?
  6. Describe the organizational/political context of the case.
  7. What issues in the case make it challenging or difficult?
  8. On what decision maker(s) does each case focus?
  9. What are the options available to the decision maker(s)?
  10. What parts of the framework for ethical decision making (in Week 11) might be helpful to the decision maker?
  11. Who is impacted by the decision that must be made, and how are they impacted?
  12. What are the pros and cons of each option?
  13. Present and discuss 2 or 3 ideas or principles from your reading assignments (including faculty presentations) for this class that may relate to this case, or some aspect of the case. If you find nothing in your readings that relate, raise this point.
  14. Discuss how this case may relate to your areas of concentration.
  15. Discuss how this case may relate to your current work/employment.
  16. If you were a consultant called in to assist the decision maker(s), what other questions would you have? What additional information would you need to know?
  17. What advice would you give to the decision-maker(s), based on your knowledge and experience? Why?
  18. What concluding comments do you have about the complexity of this work (explained in this case) in particular, and the complexity of public services (broadly defined as work for the common good) in general?

Your Case Analysis Presentations will be graded using the following criteria:

  1. The narrative should clearly address all 18 points above. Sections E through R (above) should be in clearly delineated sections marked by subheadings.
  2. Quality of writing as outlined above.
  3. Critical thinking. Did the student provide sufficient analysis in their answers? Did they offer original ideas?
  4. Questioning of assumptions. Is there evidence that the student questioned their own assumptions concerning the assignment and materials?

WEEK 12: Case Analysis Presentations

April 1 – April 7, 2013[alm10] 

Reading Assignment: Cases in Rhodes, The Public Manager Case Book: Making

decisions in a complex world.

· Jurkiewicz, “Teaching What They Practice”

· Rhodes and Swayne, “The Edifice Complex: A New Coliseum for Charlotte?”

Writing Assignments: Discuss the case analyses that are posted this week.

Case Analysis Presentations Groupwork/TEAM writing assignment: Work in your assigned teams to prepare case analysis presentations (power point AND narrative) for next week. Arrange assignments among teammates.

Like the first round of Case Analysis work, presentations will consist of a PowerPoint presentation accompanied by a detailed narrative, which are facilitated by team members in discussion threads. Each case analysis and presentation is a TEAM product, and everyone receives the same grade. Each team member is asked to submit the presentation and narrative in the DROPBOX so that the grade can be assigned to each individual in the grade book. Team members will evaluate the performance of individual team mates in the Class Participation Analysis and Team Report (due in Week 17); team evaluations are taken very seriously in calculating the final grade in this course.

Each case analysis presentation should cover the points listed in the Case Analysis Format below and in the online course.

All writing assignments for this class should be double-spaced, with one inch margins on the top, bottom and sides of each page. Be sure your name, date and course name and number are on each page of the narrative. Your narrative must be well-written, spell-checked, with zero typos, proper grammar, complete sentences, proper citations and quoted material. Your team is expected to carefully edit your writing to insure what you have written not only met all of these expectations but to be sure your writing makes sense and is readable. Always ask someone else to edit your work.

Week 12 will contain discussion threads for each group. This will facilitate your team discussions for planning your case analysis presentations. You may also talk via email, as well.

At the beginning of Week 13 your group’s PowerPoint presentation and narrative will be posted in a thread and members of your group are expected to lead the group discussion. Everyone in the class is expected to respond, discuss each presentation, ask questions and raise additional points to perhaps improve the analysis. The presenting team is responsible for facilitating the discussion, responding to points and questions related to the presentation. All team members must participate in their own team discussion as well as the other discussions that week. The presentation and discussion will be graded. The grade given to the team is the grade that each individual receives.

The cases for Week 13 are as follows:

1. Week 13-Group 1: Teaching What They Practice Group

Case: Jurkiewicz, “Teaching What They Practice.” Pages 95-102. Submit by Saturday of Week 12 10:59 PM (PST) for posting Week 13.

2. Week 13-Group 2: Charlotte Group

Rhodes and Swayne, “The Edifice Complex: A New Coliseum for Charlotte?” Pages 103-156. Submit by Saturday of Week 12 10:59 PM (PST) for posting Week 13.

Case Analysis Format

Adhere to the following format in writing your narratives and presenting your team case analyses. To receive full credit for this assignment, your team must address each of the following:

  1. The PowerPoint should serve as a summary of your narrative but should be in an outline format and not just a repeat of your narrative.
  2. The narrative should be no more than six pages (including your source page), which will be a challenge requiring you to prioritize what is most important.
  3. The length of each response to the questions above should be left up to the group’s best judgment as long as it covers the question.
  4. The length of the PowerPoint is up to the group to determine. The best PowerPoints are not text-heavy but should be simple, clean and easy to read using photos, graphics and illustrations.
  5. In two or three sentences, what is the subject matter of this case?
  6. Describe the organizational/political context of the case.
  7. What issues in the case make it challenging or difficult?
  8. On what decision maker(s) does each case focus?
  9. What are the options available to the decision maker(s)?
  10. What parts of the framework for ethical decision making (in Week 11) might be helpful to the decision maker?
  11. Who is impacted by the decision that must be made, and how are they impacted?
  12. What are the pros and cons of each option?
  13. Present and discuss 2 or 3 ideas or principles from your reading assignments (including faculty presentations) for this class that may relate to this case, or some aspect of the case. If you find nothing in your readings that relate, raise this point.
  14. Discuss how this case may relate to your areas of concentration.
  15. Discuss how this case may relate to your current work/employment.
  16. If you were a consultant called in to assist the decision maker(s), what other questions would you have? What additional information would you need to know?
  17. What advice would you give to the decision-maker(s), based on your knowledge and experience? Why?
  18. What concluding comments do you have about the complexity of this work (explained in this case) in particular, and the complexity of public services (broadly defined as work for the common good) in general?

Your Case Analysis Presentations will be graded using the following criteria:

  1. The narrative should clearly address all 18 points above. Sections E through R (above) should be in clearly delineated sections marked by subheadings.
  1. Quality of writing as outlined above.
  2. Critical thinking. Did the student provide sufficient analysis in their answers? Did they offer original ideas?
  3. Questioning of assumptions. Is there evidence that the student questioned their own assumptions concerning the assignment and materials?

WEEK 13: Case Analysis Presentations

April 8 – April 14, 2013

Writing Assignments: Discuss the case analyses that are posted this week.

Continue preparing your Capstone Constitutional Debate Presentation and Narrative (see Writing Assignment One below for a complete description of this assignment.)

Writing Assignment One: Capstone Constitutional Debate Presentation and Narrative Assignment. The Capstone Constitutional Debate Presentation and Narrative is the most important assignment in this course and is worth a total of 200 points. As you know, by Week 8, you chose a Constitutional issue and have been composing arguments on both sides (affirmative and negative) of your case. Your fellow classmates should not be able to detect your actual position on your issue until you reveal it during the discussion later in the week.

Every Capstone Constitutional Debate Presentation and Narrative will include the following: two 4-5 page narratives for each side of your case, two one page human impact statements for each side of your case, and a PowerPoint presentation that summarizes your entire case and human impact statements.

All writing assignments for this class should be double-spaced, with one inch margins on the top, bottom and sides of each page. Be sure your name, date and course name and number are on each page of the narrative. Your narrative must be well-written, spell-checked, with zero typos, proper grammar, complete sentences, proper citations and quoted material. You are expected to carefully edit your writing to insure what you have written not only met all of these expectations but to be sure your writing makes sense and is readable. You will solicit peer review on your work for this assignment (see section XVI below for details).

To receive full credit for this assignment, your team must address each of the following:

  1. Identify a Constitutional issue that you would like to explore. Draw on your reading for this class in order to identify your issue.
  2. In one sentence, state the issue to argue for (in the affirmative) and against. Submit for approval and feedback before proceeding. DUE end of week 8 10:59 PM (PST)!
  3. Once approved, develop the two opposing arguments. Use scholarly sources and government documents, including written opinions in court cases, for both sides of the issue. Use www.findlaw.com as a resource.
  4. Write a persuasive argument for each side, 4-5 pages each, with proper use of sources. This is the basis of your PowerPoint and narrative.
  5. Include a one-page human impact statement for each side—extrapolate what you can determine to be the possible impact on human dignity of those citizens who are marginalized economically in our society.
  6. Develop a PowerPoint presentation to present to the class regarding your debate, and refine your narrative.
  7. The reader must not be able to identify your personal views on this issue.
  8. Seek peer review from three members of the class along the way. Invite them to be your review team and review your drafts and make comments. Report reviewers and comments in your final presentation. See peer review guidelines below for more details (section XVI).
  9. Present your narrative, human impact statements and power point to the class within your assigned discussion thread. Lead the discussion and respond appropriately to your classmates.
  10. Late in the week of your presentation (Thursday night or Friday) and after a healthy discussion, share with the class your view of the issue. Discuss what you learned from researching and arguing the opposing viewpoint. Include a discussion of the differences between personal beliefs and public policy in a pluralistic society, as pertaining to your issue.

Your Capstone Constitutional Debate Presentation and Narrative will be graded using the grading rubric, which outlines the criteria on which the debate presentation is graded:

Competency

Exceeds Expectation (3)

Meets Expectation (2)

Does Not Meet Expectation (1)

No Evidence (0)

Cognitive Skills

Content/Comprehension: factual accuracy

no factual errors

1 or 2 factual errors

2-4 factual errors

more than 4 factual errors

Analysis: identify component parts of case

> 5 component parts of each side

5 component parts of each side

2-4 component parts of each side

< 2 component parts of each side

Synthesis: new view based on analysis

elaborated based on >5 parts

explained based on 5 parts

suggested, based on 2-4 parts

hint, or not addressed, or <2

Application: applies knowledge of Constitution to a case or issue

Strong Constitutional and public policy grounding, with legal sources

Acceptable Constitutional and public policy grounding, with scholarly sources

Weak Constitutional and public policy grounding, with few credible sources

No attempt at Constitutional or policy grounding

Technical/Professional Skills

Research Skills: use of scholarly publications, legal cases, & gov't documents

Uses >5 sources for each side

Uses 5 sources for each side

Uses 2-4 sources for each side

Uses <2 sources for each side

Technology Skills: use of appropriate technology in PPT presentation

Creative presentation w/hyperlinks

Straight text PPT with bullets

Crowded pages, no bullets

no PowerPoint

Professional Writing Skills

no errors

One or two errors

3-5 errors

>5 errors

Professional Disposition

Open-mindedness: appreciate differences in opinions

2 sides persuasively argued

2 sides clearly argued

1 side stronger than the other

no pretence of balance

Scholarly Review: asks students to review and comment

Asks more than 2 students

Asks two students

Asks one student

Does not invite review

Human Diversity and Dignity: includes impact statement on each side

Both sides elaborated w/sources

solid impact statement on both sides

impact on one side

no impact statements

Leadership skills

Facilitation of Debate

On Monday, introduce the debate and welcome discussion, responding to most of the comments

Enters the debate on Tuesday and responds to most of the comments

Enters the debate on Wednesday or after and responds to few of the comments

Enters the debate late and does not respond to individual comments

Constitutional Debate Presentations are assigned for weeks 14, 15, 16, and 17. All narratives, human impact statements and PowerPoint presentations must be submitted by Saturday night of the week before your presentation.

Writing Assignment Two: Capstone Seminar Scholarly Reflective Report. Begin work on a 5-6 page (including your source page) course reflection report, due on Friday night by 10:59 PM (PST)! of Week 17, which should address the following points:

A. The ways in which the readings in this course have or will assist you in understanding your professional experiences and involvements;

B. The ways in which the readings in this course have or will assist you in understanding your obligations as a citizen in a free society.

C. The ways in which the following skills have been enhanced by your work in this course: writing, critical thinking, decision making, and ethical awareness.

All writing assignments for this class should be double-spaced, with one inch margins on the top, bottom and sides of each page. Be sure your name, date and course name and number are on each page of the narrative. Your narrative must be well-written, spell-checked, with zero typos, proper grammar, complete sentences, proper citations and quoted material. You are expected to carefully edit your writing to insure what you have written not only met all of these expectations above but to be sure your writing makes sense and is readable. Always ask someone else to edit your work.

Your Capstone Seminar Scholarly Reflective Report will be graded using the following criteria:

  1. All of the points above were sufficiently addressed in clearly delineated sections.
  2. Quality of writing as outlined above.
  3. Critical thinking. Did the student provide sufficient analysis in their answers? Did they offer original ideas?
  4. Questioning of assumptions. Is there evidence that the student questioned their own assumptions concerning the assignment and materials?

WEEK 14: Constitutional Issue Debate Presentations

April 15 – April 21, 2013

Reading Assignment: Continue preparing your Capstone Constitutional Debate Presentation and Narrative

Writing Assignments: Discuss the Constitutional Debate Presentations that are posted this week.

Constitutional Issue Writing Assignment: For week 14 presenters, FINAL Constitutional Debate documents are due by the end of Week 15.

Presentations are assigned for weeks 14, 15, 16, and 17. All narratives, human impact statements and PowerPoint presentations must be submitted by Saturday 11:59 PM (PST)!  of the week before the presentation.

WEEK 15: Constitutional Issue Debate Presentations

April 22 – April 28, 2103

Reading Assignment: Continue preparing your Capstone Constitutional Debate Presentation and Narrative

Writing Assignments: Discuss the Constitutional Debate Presentations that are posted this week.

Constitutional Issue Writing Assignment: For week 14 presenters, FINAL Constitutional Debate documents are due by the end of Week 15.

Presentations are be assigned for weeks 14, 15, 16, and 17. All narratives, human impact statements and PowerPoint presentations must be submitted by Saturday night of the week before the presentation.

Week 16: Constitutional Debate Presentations

April 29 – May 5, 2013

Reading Assignment: Continue [alm11] preparing your Capstone Constitutional Debate Presentation and Narrative

Writing Assignments: Discuss the Constitutional Debate Presentations that are posted this week.

Presentations are assigned for weeks 14, 15, 16, and 17. All narratives, human impact statements and PowerPoint presentations must be submitted by Saturday night of the week before the presentation.

Week 17: Constitutional Debate Presentations

May 6 – May 12, 2013

Reading Assignment: MPA [alm12] Student Writing Help  sheet!!

Writing Assignments: Discuss the Constitutional Debate Presentations that are posted this week.

Report Assignments:

A. Submit your Capstone Seminar Scholarly Report of 5-6 pages by Friday night (of Week 17) by 11:59 PM (PCT)! in the Dropbox and via email. See Week 13 for a full description of this assignment.

  1. Submit all extra credit reports by Friday night of Week 17 at 10:59 PM (PST)!  in the Dropbox and via email.
  1. Class Participation Analysis and Team Report: Submit your Class Participation Analysis and Team Report 5-6 page report by Friday night (of Week 17) at 10:59 PM (PST)! in the DROP BOX and via email.

As described in Week 8, you were required to treat the weekly discussion very seriously. The Class Participation Analysis and Team Report assignment is a major research project using raw data. In this case, the raw data you will utilize is the content from your weekly discussion thread participation. You have already provided an overview of how you will empirically analyze your data to evaluate your overall performance in your weekly class participation. The Class Participation Analysis and Team Report assignment is worth a total of 300 points so it is worth more than any assignment due in this course.

All writing assignments for this class should be double-spaced, with one inch margins on the top, bottom and sides of each page. Be sure your name, date and course name and number are on each page of the narrative. Your narrative must be well-written, spell-checked, with zero typos, proper grammar, complete sentences, proper citations and quoted material. You are expected to carefully edit your writing to insure what you have written not only met all of these expectations above but to be sure your writing makes sense and is readable. Always ask someone else to edit your work.

Your Class Participation Analysis and Team Report should be 5-6 pages (including any sources) and it is due on Friday night by Midnight of Week 17. To receive full credit for this assignment, you must address each of the following points in a format using clearly delineated sections for your report:

A. Present an analysis of your class participation and discussions in this class.

B. Analyze the data carefully, present the criteria/methodology for your analysis, and recommend the number of points you should receive for participation.

C. Present the basis for your evaluation and recommendation.

D. Refer to the criteria for quality of threaded discussions (copied below). Do you use these criteria or other criteria? If you use other criteria, explain why.

E. ORGANIZE your essay logically and carefully. All rules of academic honesty apply.

F. Note the following criteria from earlier in the syllabus:

a. Students are expected to participate in class threaded discussions by posting constructively, in a timely manner, and by responses to classmates.

b. Postings must be made before the end of the day 10:59 PM (PST)! on Wednesday in order to be considered timely, allowing time for classmates to respond to your points.

c. All responses in the threaded discussions should be professional in nature.

d. An excellent response is timely and will include a citation from the reading, a personal or professional example which supports your conclusion, and proper use of grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

e. This is the final seminar in the MPA graduate program and the weekly discussion will be student-led based largely on posts and responses between students.

G. Finally, evaluate the performance of each teammate from both of your Week 12 and 13 team Case Analysis presentations. Also include an evaluation of your own performance. Be honest and specific.

Your Class Participation Analysis and Team Report will be graded using the following criteria:

A. All of the points above were sufficiently addressed in clearly delineated sections.

B. Quality of writing as outlined above.

C. Critical thinking. Did the student provide sufficient analysis in their answers? Did they offer original ideas?

D. Questioning of assumptions. Is there evidence that the student questioned their own assumptions concerning the assignment and materials?

DUE DATE for all reports: FRIDAY of Week 17 10:59 PM (PST)!

VII. EXTRA CREDIT: Students seeking extra credit can do the following for a maximum of 75 points. No extra credit will be granted unless ALL required assignments are successfully completed:

A. Book Report and Presentation. Read one of the following books, write a 5-6 page book report responding to the questions provided below, and present it to the class (facilitating the discussion) using a PowerPoint presentation. PowerPoint presentations should highlight the key points in the narrative. Book selection must be pre-approved for scheduling purposes. 75 points possible for book report and presentation.

Select one of the below listed books:

    • Balmer, Randall. Thy Kingdom Come: An Evangelical’s Lament. New York: Basic Books, 2006.
    • Brownstein, Ronald. The Second Civil War: How extreme partisanship has paralyzed Washington and polarized America. New York: The Penguin Press, 2007.
    • Reich, Robert. Supercapitalism: The transformation of business, democracy, and everyday life. New York: Vintage Books, 2007.
    • Sorkin, Andrew Ross. Too Big To Fail: The inside story of how Wall Street and Washington fought to save the financial system (and themselves). New York: The Penguin Group, 2009.

Write a 5-6 page report responding to the following questions in the following clearly delineated

sections:

A. Why did you select this book? What interest did you have in the topic before you selected the book?

B. What is the main point of the book?

C. Did you find the author’s information and reasoning credible? Why or why not?

D. How long did it take you to read the book?

E. To what extent did the book maintain your interest?

F. What was the most compelling part of the book for you? Does the content of the book relate to any of the assignments for PA 602? If so, which ones and how?

G. To what extent does the book relate to the substance of other courses in your MPA program? To your understanding of public affairs? In what ways?

H. To what extent does the book relate to your area of concentration, professional work and aspirations? In what ways?

I. Would you recommend that I replace one of the current texts with this book in future PA 602 classes? If so, which one and why? Or why not?

The report and PowerPoint presentation will be posted in a threaded discussion for the class

to read and respond. You will lead the discussion of your report and PowerPoint

presentation and answer any questions.

All writing assignments for this class should be double-spaced, with one inch margins on the top, bottom and sides of each page. Be sure your name, date and course name and number are on each page of the narrative. Your narrative must be well-written, spell-checked, with zero typos, proper grammar, complete sentences, proper citations and quoted material. You are expected to carefully edit your writing to insure what you have written not only met all of these expectations above but to be sure your writing makes sense and is readable. Always ask someone else to edit your work.

Your Extra Credit book report will be graded using the following criteria:

A. All of the points above were sufficiently addressed in clearly delineated sections.

B. Quality of writing as outlined above.

C. Critical thinking. Did the student provide sufficient analysis in their answers? Did they offer original ideas?

D. Questioning of assumptions. Is there evidence that the student questioned their own assumptions concerning the assignment and materials?

B. Attend a Lecture and Report. Attend a relevant lecture or event of interest to PA 602 and submit a written report. Reports should be 5-6 pages in length (including your source page) and should cover the highlights and key points of the lecture or event. Be sure to include background on the speaker or event including the event’s intended purpose. Lectures or other events will be announced but if students wish to attend an unannounced event, they may request approval in advance. Report should be submitted via the DROP BOX and email by Friday night at 10:59 PM (PST)! of Week 17. 25 points possible for attending a lecture and writing a report.

All writing assignments for this class should be double-spaced, with one inch margins on the top, bottom and sides of each page. Be sure your name, date and course name and number are on each page of the narrative. Your narrative must be well-written, spell-checked, with zero typos, proper grammar, complete sentences, proper citations and quoted material. You are expected to carefully edit your writing to insure what you have written not only met all of these expectations above but to be sure your writing makes sense and is readable.  Always ask someelse to edit your work.  Read it aloud to ensure it makes sense and is coherent.    

 

 

 

 

Academic Honesty:
As a learning community, the University upholds the highest standards of academic integrity in all its academic activities, by faculty, staff, administrators and students. Academic integrity involves much more than respecting intellectual property rights. It lies at the heart of learning, creativity, and the core values of the University. Those who learn, teach, write, publish, present, or exhibit creative works are advised to familiarize themselves with the requirements of academic integrity and make every effort to avoid possible offenses against it, knowingly or unknowingly. Park University 2012-2013 Graduate Catalog Page 21-22

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism is the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct.  Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2011-2012 Graduate Catalog Page 21


Attendance Policy:

Students must participate in an academically related activity on a weekly basis in order to be marked present in an online class. Examples of academically-related activities include but are not limited to: contributing to an online discussion, completing a quiz or exam, completing an assignment, initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a course related question, or using any of the learning management system tools. Park University 2012-2013 Graduate Catalog Page 26

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

XV. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION REVIEW GUIDELINES FOR MANUSCRIPTS


A. Quotations

Quoted matter that runs six or more typed lines or that involves two or more paragraphs should be set off as a block quotation; the quotation should start a new line, be set without quotation marks, and be set in 11-point type. Shorter quotations are run into the text and enclosed in quotation marks. Be sure to include page number(s) where quotation appeared.


Quotation marks should be used to set off a word of unusual meaning or an unfamiliar, excessively slangy, or coined word the first time it is used. Quotation marks are unnecessary thereafter. Commonly known facts and proverbial, biblical, and well-known literary expressions do not need to be enclosed in quotation marks.


B. Capitalization

When in doubt, do not capitalize. Only acronyms and the word PAR should appear in all capital letters (after one spelled-out use). Civil, military, religious, and professional titles and titles of nobility are capitalized only when they immediately precede a personal name and are thus used as part of the name. Article and section titles of any kind should be capitalized in title case.


C. Italics

Italicize names of books, newspapers, and journals; please do not underline them. Italicize the names of plaintiff and defendant in the citation of legal cases. Italics are used for isolated words and phrases in a foreign language if they are likely to be unfamiliar to readers. Foreign words or phrases familiar to most readers and listed in Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition (for example, laissez faire) are not italicized if used in an English context. Italicize a word on its first occurrence; thereafter they are best set in roman. Italics may be used for emphasis and on the first occurrence.


D. Citing Works within the Text

To cite the works you used in developing your article, use the author-date system. For each work to which you refer, supply the author’s last (family) name, date of publication of the work cited and a page number(s) if needed. There should be a reference list entry for every text citation. (**Please note, no punctuation is used between author name and date). For example: (Smith 1993, 24) or (Jones 1992, 37–40)


If you refer to an author in the text, the publication date and page numbers are a sufficient reference. For example: As Johnson argues (1994, 17)…


If a work has more than three authors, use the name of the first author followed by et al. For example: (Davidson et al. 1990, 27)


If you cite more than one work by the same author produced in the same year, distinguish among the works with an alphabetical identifier after the date. For example: (Lowi 1985a, 13; Lowi 1985b, 18).


Assign letters to the dates of each work according to the alphabetical order of the titles of the works. For example: If you cite The City and Urban Policy by Smith and both were published in 1987, cite The City as (Smith 1987a) and Urban Policy as (Smith 1987b).


If you cite an electronic source, include the author’s last name (or file name if author’s name is not available [for example, cgos.html]) and the date of publication or last revision (or date accessed if publication date is not available)


.


E. Notes

Please DO NOT use footnotes. Use endnotes to elaborate or comment on material in the text and place them at the end of the text under the subhead “Notes.” Notes should not be created by use of the footnote or endnote feature of the word processor. PAR’s typesetting process cannot use endnotes prepared in this way. Endnote reference numbers in the text are set as superscript numbers—use the superscript feature under “Fonts” to insert endnote numbers. In the notes themselves, the numbers are full size (12-point roman type) and followed by a period.


F. References

(For general information, please refer to the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, Documentation I: Basic Patterns—The Author–Date System: Reference Lists and Text Citations. For more specific content, see Documentation II: Specific Content)


Prepare a list of all the works you cite in the text and arrange them alphabetically by author’s last name (please include only the works that are cited in the text). If you cite more than one work by the same author, a 3-em dash replaces the name after the first appearance and the entries are arranged by the year of publication in ascending order (earliest to latest). If you cite more than one work by the same author published in the same year, arrange them alphabetically by title and distinguish them by putting an a, b, c, and so forth, following the year of publication. Titles and subtitles of books and articles in the references are capitalized headline style. Please include author’s full given name, instead of using initials.


Examples of some of the more common reference list entries are as follows:


a. Book, single author:

Goodsell, Charles T. 1994. The Case for Bureaucracy: A Public Administration Polemic. 3d ed. Chatham, NJ: Chatham House.


b. Book, multiple authors: (only the first author’s name is inverted)

Keehley, Patricia, Steven Medlin, Laura Longmire, and Sue A. MacBride. 1997. Benchmarking for Best Practices in the Public Sector: Achieving Performance Breakthroughs in Federal, State, and Local Agencies. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.


c. Book, edited:

Halachmi, Arie, and Geert Bouckaert, eds. 1995. The Enduring Challenges in Public Management: Surviving and Excelling in a Changing World. San Francisco, CA: Jossey- Bass.


d. Chapter or selection in an edited book: (Please note: no quotation marks around chapter title. Please include page numbers.)

Ingraham, Patricia W., and David H. Rosenbloom. 1992. The State of Merit in the Federal Government. In Agenda for Excellence: Public Service in America, edited by Patricia W. Ingraham and Donald F. Kettl, 274 - 96. Chatham, NJ: Chatham House.


e. Journal Article: (Please note: no quotation marks around article title)

Roberts, Alasdair. 1995. Civic Discovery as Rhetorical Strategy. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 14(2): 291 - 307. ("14" is the volume number, "2" is the issue number, and "291 - 307" is the page range. If possible, please use issue number and not month.)


f. Newspaper Article: (please note: page numbers are best omitted, section number or name may be included)

Walker, Robert. 1995. Reality Strikes Mission to Planet Earth. Space News, August 28 - September 3, A1.


g. Non- English Titles:

Title of works in languages other than English are treated the same as English titles except that capitalization follows the conventions of the language of the work. An English translation should be provided for all titles (book titles, journal titles, journal article titles, newspapers, etc.). The translation should follow the title, enclosed in brackets without italics or quotation marks, and only the first word (of title and subtitle) and proper nouns and adjectives are capitalized.


Mayntz, Renate, and Fritz W. Scharpf. 1973. Planungsorganisation: die Diskussion um die Reform von Regierung und Verwaltung des Bundes (Planning organization: A debate on the reform of government and administration of Germany). München: Piper.


h. Papers Presented at Meetings, Conferences, etc.: (Please include month and days, as well as the city and state)

Baker, George. 1999. Distortion, Noise, and Incentive Provision with Imperfect Performance Measures. Paper presented at the National Academy of Sciences conference on Devising Incentives to Promote Human Capital, December 17 - 18, Irvine, California.


i. Public Documents/Reports and Documents:

U.S. House. 1993. Committee of the Budget. Omnibus Budget and Reconciliation Act of 1993: Report on the Budget. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Report no. 103-111.


j. Hearings:

U.S. House. 1994. Committee on Public Works and Transportation. 1993 Empowerment Zone and Enterprise Community Program: Hearing before the Subcommittee on Economic Development. 103rd Cong., 2nd sess. February 7.


k. Court Decisions/Legal Cases:

The names of legal cases are italicized when mentioned in the text and the abbreviation v. should also be italicized. These should be cited in the text and are NOT listed separately in the reference list. Examples of citations in running text follow:

In 1941, Bridges v. California (314 U.S. 252)

United States v. Katzwallader (183 F.2d 210 [1950])


l. Electronic Sources/Electronic Books:

Full facts of publication should be noted, including author’s last and first name, date of publication, title, chapters or other titled parts of a book, edition, multivolume works, etc. (if applicable), a URL or address, including the path or directories necessary to access the document. Since some books are published in printed and electronic forms, always cite the source consulted.


Burka, L.P. 1993. A Hypertext History of Multi-User Dimensions. MUD History..



       

             
    1. Electronic Journals:

             Follow the example for the printed form of a journal article and add the URL (address) at the end of the citation.

             Online Newspapers, News Services and other News Sites:

             These are identical to their print counterparts, with the addition of a URL.

             Informally Published Electronic Material:

             Include as much of the following information as can be determined: author of the content, title of the page, title or owner of the site, and the URL. When there is no clear indication of authorship, title, publisher, or date, it is still necessary to include the URL and what the source is (descriptive phrases may be used). If a site ceases to exist before publication, include such information parenthetically at the end of the citation.

    2.    


XVI. Peer Review Guidelines for PA 602 For Capstone Constitutional Debate Presentation and Narrative


The ability to ask for, give, receive, and use constructive feedback from peers is a key professional skill. You will want to try to secure the assistance of three classmates to serve as peer reviewers for your Capstone Constitutional Debate Presentation and Narrative assignment. Invite each one individually, and understand if they have to decline due to their schedules. Keep in mind that it is an honor to be asked to review someone’s work.



       
  1. PEER REVIEW GUIDELINES


How you review a classmate's work depends upon when you are doing the reviewing. Guidelines for peer reviews suggest reviews at up to three different points in the writing process:


1. An evaluation of a rough draft should focus primarily on revising, which is to say, it should pay attention primarily to such major components of the paper as the thesis sentence, the support for the thesis, and the organization. It should praise the draft's strengths, but it should provide mostly suggestions for improvement.


2. An evaluation of a preliminary draft should focus not just on revising but also on editing, which is to say, it should pay more detailed attention to transitions, style, diction, and mechanics. It should praise the draft's strengths, but it should provide mostly suggestions for improvement.


3. An evaluation of a final draft should pay attention to every aspect of the paper, including its topic, thesis, argument, organization, style, mechanics, and insight. It should primarily praise the draft's strengths, though it may offer brief suggestions for improvement, recognizing that it is too late for the writer to respond to detailed suggestions or corrections.


Pay attention to the MPA Student Writing Helpsheet, and offer helpful suggestions to your classmate based on that document as well as your general knowledge of writing, grammar, and argument.


In addition, check with the author of the debate documents with regard to following the directions in the assignment and presenting persuasive arguments on both sides.



       
  1. EDITING QUESTIONS FOR PEER REVIEWERS


Transitions


a. Are the transitions between sections and paragraphs effective?

b. Did you feel lost at any point? Where?


Style


a. Is the style sufficiently clear, varied, and graceful?

b. Where are the unclear, monotonous, or awkward passages?

c. Is the style concise?

d. Do you see any wordy passages?

e. Do you see any clichés?

f. Do you see any excessive use of to be verb forms (is, are, etc.)?


Diction


a. Does the language seem appropriate for its intended audience?

b. Do you see any discriminatory language?

c. Do you see any excessively formal or informal language?


Mechanics


a. Have the mechanical details (spelling, punctuation, etc.) been handled accurately and carefully?

b. What errors did you notice?


"Do's" and "Don'ts" of Peer Evaluations


Peer Evaluations: Some "Do's"


1. Do treat the writer with courtesy and respect.


2. Do comment on the performance, not the person.


3. Do focus on how the argument is supported (or not), rather than whether you agree or disagree with it.


4. Do aim for balance and completeness in pointing out strengths and problem areas.


5. Do comment on specific examples of strengths and problem areas.


6. Do aim to help the writer see how to improve future work as well as the current draft.


Peer Evaluations: Some "Don'ts"


1. Don't use snippy marginal comments such as "So what?" or "What's your point?"


2. Don't get into debates over unresolvable questions of individual value and belief (for example, questions relating to religion, gun control, or abortion).


3. Don't argue with the writer. Raise objections or ask for explanations only to clarify and suggest ways of strengthening the argument.


4. Don't confine your comments to mechanical details.


5. Don't make vague, global comments.


6. Don't rewrite for the writer.



       
  1. Acknowledge Peer Reviewers in Final Work


For acknowledgments, place a screen in your power point and an endnote in your narrative that reads somewhat as follows:


My deep appreciation goes to my peer reviewers, [name members of this class], for their helpful suggestions on these documents. While I gratefully accept their assistance, all errors are my own and I take full responsibility for all errors in this assignment.


There is no need to footnote what your peer reviewers provide, unless you use their exact wording. Then by all means footnote. No need to footnote or acknowledge every detail (such as: “Many thanks to Jane Smith for calling my attention to the fact that I need to place a comma here”).


 

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Last Updated:12/28/2012 8:46:48 PM