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ED 563 Leadrshp & Policy in Adult Educ.
Dailey-Hebert, Amber


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

School For Education Mission Statement
The School for Education at Park University, an institution committed to diversity and best practice, prepares educators to be effective school professionals, reflective change agents, and advocates for equity and excellence for all learners.



Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

School For Education Vision Statement
The School for Education at Park University is to be known as a leader in the preparation of educators who will address the needs, challenges, and possibilities of the 21st century.

Park University School for Education  Conceptual Framework


Course

ED 563 Leadrshp & Policy in Adult Educ.

Semester

U1P 2013 DL

Faculty

Dailey-Hebert, Amber

Title

Professor, Adult Education

Degrees/Certificates

Ph.D - Cornell University
M.S - Texas A&M University
B.S - Texas A&M Universtiy

Office Location

Virtual office (Skype, phone, or chat)

Office Hours

Tuesday 9:30-4:00pm CST

Daytime Phone

816-584-6339

E-Mail

adailey@park.edu

Semester Dates

Summer Term (June 3 - July 28)

Class Days

TBA

Class Time

TBA

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:
No required texts: all readings available online

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.
Advising - Park University would like to assist you in achieving your educational goals. Please contact your Campus Center for advising or enrollment adjustment information.
Online Classroom Technical Support - For technical assistance with the Online classroom, email helpdesk@parkonline.org or call the helpdesk at 866-301-PARK (7275). To see the technical requirements for Online courses, please visit the http://parkonline.org website, and click on the "Technical Requirements" link, and click on "BROWSER Test" to see if your system is ready.
FAQ's for Online Students - You might find the answer to your questions here.


Course Description:
ED563 Leadership and Policy in Adult Education: This course will examine individual and professional leadership development for administrator of adult education and training program. Ethical and policy implications from federal and local decisions on leadership and management of programs will also be explored.

Educational Philosophy:
Introduction

Organizations today are in a state of continuous change as they adapt to new global realities. The ability for leaders in adult education to embrace change quickly and effectively, with committed and capable people, is the new strategic advantage.

Overview of readings & assignments

This course will be a bit unique compared to your traditional education courses and will be focused primarily on the practical knowledge and dispositions that will help to further develop your innovation, strategy, and change management skillsets in our ever changing, dynamic, and globally connected world. This will be evident in the course materials, the assignments, and course setup. The course is based on Adult Learning theory models and values the expertise, experiences, and knowledge you bring to the course. Therefore, all assignments are designed to empower you through self-directed learning, application of information to your own contextual environment, and to utilize collaboration to promote peer learning.

Although I will share a list of my favorite books related to the course topics which have influenced my thinking significantly, I understand that we each have our own unique process of learning and ways to create meaning. Therefore, rather than purchasing expensive books and assigning the readings based on what the instructor thinks is important, you will instead use free trials, online resources, and Park's electronic library to help you complete analysis and evaluation. Part of being a good adult educator is learning how to locate resources, and you will develop this skillset during the next 8 weeks.

To be commensurate with graduate level work, it's critical to have time to reflect upon and create new understanding from our highlighted topics in each unit – therefore, the first 4 weeks of the course information will be covered in 2 units (2 weeks each) in order to allow time for such reflection, deeper discussion, action, and knowledge construction toward larger, more meaningful and applicable projects. The last 4 weeks of the class will be dedicated to one project. We will use the Problem-Based Learning project structure to address a real-world problem and in your teams you will enhance your research and online search skills through guided readings that YOU will select and will share with the class (this will also allow our class to build a repository of resources that you can utilize after the course). You will be empowered to determine which readings create the most meaning and context for you each week, and will reflect on how they relate to each weekly topic.

Since we know that professionals today may experience multiple careers in various fields, it's critical to develop a transferable skillset that can be valued and utilized across positions, organizations, and vocations. Therefore, the course has been designed to support the andragogical values below:

Andragogical ValueLearner Dispositions
Non-linear paths to learning
  • Self-directed learning
  • Adaptability
  • Critical thinking and analysis
  • Problem-solving
  • Reflection
Peer learning
  • Collaborative exchange
  • Communication (both written and verbal)
  • Perspective transformation
  • Conflict resolution
Global Connectedness
  • Personal investment in global social issues
  • Cross-cultural understanding
  • Ability to forge connections
Application
  • Empathy
  • Civic responsibility
  • Synthesis
  • Commitment to human dignity
  • Creativity
  • Holistic thinking

(Adapted from Dailey-Hebert, Donnelli-Sallee, DiPadova-Stocks, 2008).


Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify a personal leadership style;
  2. Develop a personal leadership improvement plan;
  3. Define ethics and policy as it relates to adult education and training;
  4. Identify the key stakeholders in an organization;
  5. Conduct an environmental scan to determine policy development;
  6. Identify local and national officials which affect ones program


Core Assessment:

Class Assessment:
Class Assessment Journal/Self-Study

You will submit a weekly journal entry during Weeks 1-4. This journal is intended for two primary purposes, as you will:

  • Synthesize your findings from your self-study each week (which helps you organize information to prepare for your team meetings/video conference calls)
  • Digest and reflect upon what you have learned during the week, and during the PBL process. (which will assist in your metacognitive understanding and reflection on your learning)
Part 1:

You should synthesize your findings from your self study (i.e. what you learned independently that you plan to share with your team). There is no length requirement. This can be shared in whatever format you prefer: bulleted list, narrative, paragraph, etc.

Part 2:

The journal should also include a reflective component. This activity does not need to be lengthy, but should simply provide a venue to share reflections, new ideas that are generated, or observations from your experience that week during the PBL process.

The weekly journal should be submitted before the following week's video conference call (i.e. Week 5 journal should be submitted by or before the Week 6 video conference call), and will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

CriteriaNot ApplicableMinimum Point CriteriaPoint RangeMaximum Point Criteria

Clarity of Writing

N/A

Obscure

1

2

3

4

5

Clear

Theoretical Framework and Disciplinary context

N/A

Insignificant

1

2

3

4

5

Highly Significant

Relevancy for Professional Practice

N/A

Lack Originality

1

2

3

4

5

Original ideas

Definition of Concepts / Resources referenced and cited

N/A

Poor

1

2

3

4

5

Excellent

Provides personal reflection on this week’s learning process

N/A

Poor

1

2

3

4

5

Excellent

(Adapted from Gijselaers, 2010)

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Team Analysis Due Week 2 & Week 4 – 25 points each= 50 points

The team analysis is intended to promote collaborative knowledge sharing (through engaged dialogue related to self-study results) and knowledge building (producing new knowledge through your team analysis). As your team works together to create a shared mental model for how to approach the problem statement, the team analysis represents the result or outcome of your work. The team analysis does not necessarily produce a concrete solution or result, but rather explores the information gained, the team's perspective on how that information can be used in the context of the problem statement, and then shares the team's new mental model as a result.

It is important to enter the Team Analysis with an entrepreneurial spirit and to support one another's learning. A positive communication climate is one that promotes asking questions, reflecting on the opinions and thoughts of others, and integrating ideas to form a collective and mutually agreed upon understanding. In the pre-discussion and post-discussion, it is recommend that your group identify a discussion leader and record keeper, and it will be to the discretion of the team. The instructor will serve as a facilitator and guide, however, your team will be responsible for the agenda and dialogue during the pre/post dicussions.

While the Journal activity represents your individual contribution; the Team Analysis represents your collective contribution. You are all responsible, professional adults who will also need to manage the dynamics of your team. And as PBL is designed to promote contextual learning, if your team is faced with a member who does not contribute, your team has the authority to remedy the situation and work toward a solution or to fire the team member (which results in he/she failing the Team Analysis). Therefore, participation in the pre-post discussion is vitally important for your group, and you should fully prepare your self-study notes in an organized fashion to share easily with your team. The team analysis will be evaluated based on the following criteria in Weeks 2 and Week 4

 Quality Indicator

Minimum Point Criteria

Point Range

Maximun Point Criteria

Clarity of Writing

Obscure

1

2

3

4

5

Clear

Cites and references resources used

Minimally explained

1

2

3

4

5

Fully explained

Identification of high impact, high probability items within the analysis

Not identified

1

2

3

4

5

Fully identified

Comprehensive conclusion that synthesizes information gained from the analysis

Minimally explained

1

2

3

4

5

Fully explained

Demonstrates an understanding of impact in the context of life/workplace.

Obscure

1

2

3

4

5

Clear

TOTAL

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Cultural Analysis and Presentation 75 points – Due in Week 4; 25 points for Cultural Analysis; 50 points for Board Presentation

*(Before beginning this assignment, you will need to sign up for a 'free trial' at countrynavigator.com; please create your account before beginning this assignment).

The Assignment:

Your organization is "going global". You’ve been asked to lead a project team for your organization that is acquiring a new subsidiary in India. You have been appointed as the ‘Integration Liaison’ to ensure a successful merger between the two separate entities into one cohesive unit. Complete the cultural analysis between these two countries (India and United Kingdom UK) and identify an action plan that will be proposed to the Board of Directors (i.e. your team) to ensure successful communication for the merger. Your team will need to present your plan (i.e. your recommendations for the board to consider before merging these two groups) and your team's presentation needs to be accessible online (via ppt., articulate, prezi, etc.) and shared with the class.  It should include multimedia (audio, video, content, etc.) and should cite resources to demonstrate validity of your recommendations.

Details & Rationale:

As we work in an increasingly 'flat world' (Friedman, 2006) and a workforce that transcends the boundaries of geography, it becomes more valuable to develop a skillset for cross-cultural collaboration and communication. Therefore, the first element is to learn how to understand cultural differences, similarities, and how to foster a productive environment across cultures, locations, and working with new virtual tools. Using 'countrynavigator.com' software to assist, you will conduct a Cultural Analysis between India and the UK– Identify key barriers to communication, working relationships, in the context of leading a diverse team, that may result from collaborating between different countries/cultures (example: Japan and the US). You will submit a Cultural Analysis that Includes:

  • Relating – how we relate to others
    • task vs. relationship
    • explicit vs. implicit
    • individual vs. group
  • Regulating – how we make decisions
    • risk-taking vs. risk avoiding
    • tight vs. loose
    • shared vs. concentrated
  • Reasoning – How we think
    • linear vs. circular
    • facts vs. thinking
    • simple vs. complex
  • You will need to evaluate and discuss how these areas (listed above) will impact the 2 project teams to merge into one successful unit.
  • Following the analysis, you will need to create a presentation that outlines your recommendations to the board for how to ensure successful communication during this merger, explaining which factors need to be taken into account. Your instructor and team in this class will serve as the "Board of Directors" and they will be responsible for posing questions to you about your presentation. You will be responsible for sharing your presentation with the class using the discussion area (include link to your presentation, or as an attachment).
  • The Cultural Analysis should be posted within discussion area.
Analysis = 25 points

QUALITY INDICATOR

Minimum Point Criteria

Point Range

Maximum Point Criteria

Clarity of Writing

Obscure

1

2

3

4

5

Clear

RELATING – compares and identifies the cultural implications in all 3 areas.

Minimally explained

1

2

3

4

5

Fully explained

REGULATING - compares and identifies the cultural implications in all 3 areas.

Minimally explained

1

2

3

4

5

Fully explained

REASONING - compares and identifies the cultural implications in all 3 areas.

Minimally explained

1

2

3

4

5

Fully explained

Demonstrates how the 2 different cultural communication modes may impact the merger and future work environment

Obscure

1

2

3

4

5

Clear

TOTAL

Presentation = 50 points

QUALITY INDICATOR

Minimum Point Criteria

Point Range

Maximum Point Criteria

Demonstrates adequate preparation and knowledge on the topic.

Obscure

1

2

3

4

5

Clear

Uses credible and concrete information to add validity to the presentation

Lacks credibility

1

2

3

4

5

Very credible

Utilizes tools to connect and present information in an engaging manner

Little engagement

1

2

3

4

5

Very engaging

Presents a memorable and provoking action plan to merge the 2 groups

Poor

1

2

3

4

5

Excellent

Completes the presentation in a timely and effective manner

Ineffective

1

2

3

4

5

Very effective

TOTAL

Combined Peer Review & Evaluation Results = 25 points

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PBL Project (Weeks 5-8)

As opposed to traditional courses, in which you arrange your work efforts to meet the set criteria and grade. The criteria for evaluation of the PBL Project in Weeks 5-8 will be determined by YOU, the learners. Below are areas in which data will be collected regarding your contributions and learning for this project. However, you will evaluate your learning based on these elements (in week 8) and submit an evaluation proposal that synthesizes your learning, the feedback you received in each area below, and your proposed point allocation (totaling 100 points). You will submit your individual evaluation proposal and discuss it with the instructor in Week 8 to determine the final grade. It is the intent to put the focus of the next 4 weeks on learning, on the process and journey, rather than the grade.

Outside Evaluation by Experts

Since our Project work in weeks 5-8 PBL will involve a culminating PBL experience with a presentation and written project report, systematic evaluation of these capstone projects by a team of outside experts can afford one means of assessing your performance. The ACHE leadership, external stakeholders, will provide an evaluation of your presentations and report.

Content Analysis of Projects

Because PBL uses ill structured problems with many possible solutions, each student group within a class may pursue a slightly different domain of knowledge. To assess the range of content knowledge learned by students in the class, we will evaluate across assignments and groups to look for the variety of resources you are all collecting. Project analyses may also be useful in assessing the development of your researching, critical analysis, or writing skills.

Focus Groups

One method that can prove useful for assessing outcomes such as teamwork or leadership is the use of focus groups. You can offer perspectives on your experience within the problem solving group and may be able to reflect on your own growth across the experience. We will host a focus group in Week 8 during our final videocall.

Peer Evaluations

Many PBL courses use some form of peer evaluation as a means of moderating individual student behavior within the group setting. However, these evaluations can also be used to gather data about the level of skill development across individuals in the class. In week 8, you will have the opportunity to evaluate your peers and team members.

Journals or Activity Logs

Students in PBL classes often do the bulk of the work for a project outside the synchronous meeting time (or videoconference call). The work completed outside the classroom can be difficult to assess, so many courses require students to keep a log or journal of the work they complete for the project. This course has combined a weekly activity log and personal reflection into one weekly journal activity.

Personal Reflections

For many students, the type of active learning that PBL requires is an unusual experience. One method for assisting in your metacognitive understanding of the PBL process is to have you reflect on the experience of PBL at key points in the process (in our case, once per week). Qualitative analyses of these reflections can offer supportive evidence for many process type outcomes such as developing critical thinking or research skills.

These techniques focus on the contextual nature of PBL, requiring the students to produce an authentic product that is related to the problem and to make judgments about their performances.

Grading:
Grading Policy

In addition to weekly videoconference calls as a class, the course will center on 4 primary activities:

Learning ActivityWeek AssignedPoint Value

Journal/Self-study

1 - 4

25 points each = 100 pts.

Team Analysis

2 & 4

25 points each = 50 pts.

Board Presentation: Cultural Analysis Action Plan

4

50 points

Project (PBL)

5 - 8

100 points

Late Submission of Course Materials:

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

Academic Honesty:
As a learning community, the University upholds the highest standards of academic integrity in all its academic activities, by faculty, staff, administrators and students. Academic integrity involves much more than respecting intellectual property rights. It lies at the heart of learning, creativity, and the core values of the University. Those who learn, teach, write, publish, present, or exhibit creative works are advised to familiarize themselves with the requirements of academic integrity and make every effort to avoid possible offenses against it, knowingly or unknowingly. Park University 2012-2013 Graduate Catalog Page 21-22

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism is the appropriation of another person's ideas, interpretation, words (even a few), data, statements, illustration or creative work and their presentation as one's own. An offense against plagiarism constitutes a serious academic misconduct.  Although offenses against academic integrity can manifest themselves in various ways, the most common forms of offenses are plagiarism and cheating. Plagiarism goes beyond the copying of an entire article. It may include, but is not limited to: copying a section of an article or a chapter from a book, reproduction of an art work, illustration, cartoon, photograph and the like and passing them off as one's own. Copying from the Internet is no less serious an offense than copying from a book or printed article, even when the material is not copyrighted.

Plagiarism also includes borrowing ideas and phrases from, or paraphrasing, someone else's work, published or unpublished, without acknowledging and documenting the source. Acknowledging and documenting the source of an idea or phrase, at the point where it is utilized, is necessary even when the idea or phrase is taken from a speech or conversation with another person.

Park University 2012-2013 Graduate Catalog Page 21


Attendance Policy:

Students must participate in an academically related activity on a weekly basis in order to be marked present in an online class. Examples of academically-related activities include but are not limited to: contributing to an online discussion, completing a quiz or exam, completing an assignment, initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a course related question, or using any of the learning management system tools. Park University 2012-2013 Graduate Catalog Page 26

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

Bibliography:

Copyright:

This material is protected by copyright and can not be reused without author permission.

Last Updated:5/13/2013 10:36:03 AM