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CA 115 Intro Electronic Communication
Aitken, Renee


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

CA 115 Intro Electronic Communication

Semester

S1DD 2013 DC

Faculty

Aitken, Renee F.

Title

Adjunct Faculty

Degrees/Certificates

PhD - Education
MS - Telecommunications Engineering and Management
MA- Organizational Communication

Office Location

USA

Daytime Phone

614-404-6876

Other Phone

614-876-8685

E-Mail

renee.aitken@park.edu

reneeaitken@gmail.com

Semester Dates

Monday, January 14, 2013 to Sunday, March 10, 2013

Class Days

Monday

Class Time

5:00 - 11:00 PM

Credit Hours

3


Textbook:

There are no course textbooks, however students will be required to read journal articles, web based articles, and other information provided in class and in the documents section of the course companion Website.

Additional Resources:

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
CA115 Introduction to Electronic Communication: A survey of the emerging vehicles for electronic communication from Internet to radio and television. Includes discussion of how electronic communication affects the audience, research and methodology used to analyze that effect, introduction to the skills of electronic communication, and consideration of the specific ethical issues often associated with electronic images. 3:0:3

Educational Philosophy:
Adult learning requires students to be engaged. Classes will be interactive with activities designed to increase understanding and involve students in discovery of information. A variety of media sources will be used to highlight and support the concepts being discussed in class. Because most work environments involve teams and groups, they will be used in class for activities.

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Describe, analyze and discuss the theory and history of radio, TV, and the Internet. This will be demonstrated in papers and projects describing and analyzing changes in the electronic media.
  2. Describe, evaluate, and analyze the role of government in regulating electronic media. This will be demonstrated in papers and projects describing and analyzing the interplay between government and electronic media, particularly in cases relating to indecency.
  3. Discuss analytically the changing role electronic media play in society, and the societal impact of the mass media.
  4. Develop and describe criteria for determining how, as parents, students will control their children's media consumption.
  5. List and discuss analytically the characteristics of quality journalism across many media, and the role journalists play in society.


  Instructor Learning Outcomes
  1. PLEASE NOTE IN THE CORE ASSESSMENT BELOW ITEM 3 SHOULD
  2. NOT BE AN ITEM UNDER PART A BUT A NEW PARAGRAPH FOR PART B
  3. STUDENTS GET CONFUSED!!!
Core Assessment:

Core Assessment


The core assessment for CA115 Introduction to Electronic Communication will be a take-home final examination. A copy of the exam is pasted below.


 


Directions:


You will be writing four two-page essays on the topics listed below. You will write both the essays in category A; then you will choose two from among those listed in category B.


 


An acceptable (B-C) essay must do the following:



  1. Address the question(s) posed;
  2. Use lecture notes and handouts from class as evidence to support your position;
  3. Be the appropriate length (1 ¾ pages to 2 ¼ pages);
  4. Provide some insight or analysis about the question;
  5. Be grammatically correct, use good spelling, etc. 

An exceptional (A) essay will do all the following listed above. It will also:



  1. Provide a more sophisticated analysis of the subject, showing originality of thought;
  2. Use 1-2 pieces of outside (student conducted) research to support the writer’s position. 

Essay topics—Category A. All students must answer both of these questions:



  1. What is indecency, by both your definition and the FCC’s? How has the Super Bowl incident changed the rules for indecency? What is the future for indecency enforcement?
  2. How would society be different if TV were banned? Would our kids, and our families, benefit from this? 
  3. Essay topics—Category B. Select and answer any two of these questions.
  4. What is the future for media in Iraq? Will media ever be free there?
  5. How have changes in media ownership changed the media landscape?
  6. Rate the effectiveness, now and in the future, of the Internet as a marketing tool and as an advertising medium.
  7. Discuss and evaluate the effectiveness of TV election coverage in November. Did TV learn from the mistakes of 2000?
  8. What is the future of broadcast radio, given the changes in media ownership and the competition from satellite radio?

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
 

We will use a variety of assessment instruments including; attendance, participation in content discussion (peer teaching), homework, and exams.

Grading:

Week Assignments – 40%
Current Events – 30% (also counts towards participation)
Mid term paper– 15%
Final paper – 15%
  • Any form of cheating or two consecutive unexcused absences will result in a letter grade of F.
  • Two unexcused absences may result in an administrative withdrawal.
  • An absence is defined as not being present for the entire class.
  • The course grade for students will be based on the overall average of homework and exams taken during the course in accordance with the weighting of the various requirements as stated in the syllabus.

Late Submission of Course Materials:
 

There will be no late submissions of course material. Homework will be turned in when you enter class and you should make a copy for yourself to have when we review the answers. Since you have the options of email, it is my expectation that even if you cannot make it to class, your homework will be sent on the night you miss. If you must be absent for an exam, a separate exam will be prepared for you and left in the Park Offices. You must arrange to complete it prior to the next class meeting.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:
 

1.      Class will start on time at 5:00 pm sharp.

2.      Cell phones must be turned off or in the vibrate mode.

3.      Do not plan or expect to stay for half the class time as you will be marked absent.

4.      One conversation at a time.

5.      Respect the instructor.

6.      Respect fellow classmates.

7.      All homework assignments are to be done on time.

8.      All homework will be prepared using Microsoft Word. No handwritten homework will be accepted.

9.      Professionalism is expected by all college students.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:

In weeks 2- 7,  students will be asked to locate a current article from a newspaper, journal, or internet search on the use of electronic communication, write a short paragraph on the article, and turn in the paragraph in class. These will be graded.
 
Week 1 - In class assignment on journalism – Class will be asked to define the characteristics of quality journalism and the role journalists play in society. Discuss on syllabus and how class will be conducted.  Discuss how to write papers and APA requirements.

Week 2 - Freedom of Speech – The Early Years – Discussion on the Freedom of Speech and how communication was conducted before electronic media. Students will submit a 1-2 page paper presenting their arguments on the importance of freedom of speech to the United States. Papers will require citation of at least 3 references and be written using APA.

Week 3 - Radio – 1920-1940s – Network Diagram, FCC regulations, and discussion on the impact of radio on society. Students will listen to War of the Worlds broadcast before class and will be asked to locate another important use of radio in the 1920-1940s. Students will present a diagram of a radio network, create a list of at least 5 important FCC rulings and why they are important for radio, and discuss how radio is being used today.

Week 4 - Midterm – The midterm will be an in class 3-4 page paper based on a current event regarding the media. It will require students to review the impact of the type of media (TV, Radio, Internet) has on the situation. For example, they might be asked to compare and contrast one facet of Gulf Oil Spill crisis from the three different types of media. Students will be given 3 references and they will be asked to use APA.

Week 5 - TV – 1950-1980s – Network Diagram, FCC regulations, and discussion on the impact of TV on society. Students will be asked locate watch a 50s newscast and several TV show from each of the decades (50s, 60s, 70s, and 80s). Students will present diagrams of broadcast TV, satellite TV, and cable TV, create a list of at least 5 important FCC rulings and why they are important for TV, and discuss how TV is being used today. 

Week 6 - Internet – 1990s - Present – Network Diagram, FCC regulations, and discussion on the impact of the Internet on society. Students will be asked locate three websites: a good, a bad, and an ugly related to share in class. (Topics may include Children and the Media, Social Networks, News, Immediacy, Accuracy, or Marketing.) Students will present diagrams of the internet, create a list of at least 5 important FCC rulings and why they are important for the internet, and discuss how the internet is being used. Students will write a short, 3-4 page paper on how they believe the internet will be changing in the next ten years with at least 3 references and in APA.

Week 7 – The class will draw a timeline of electronic communication to include FCC rulings, the social norms, communication invention and acceptance, the impact of the electronic communication, and connect these on a timeline on the board. The class will be divided into teams and a decade will be assigned to each team.  Students will present their decade and the class will draw parallels between each electronic media.  Students will be assigned their final paper for Week 8.

Week 8 - Comprehensive Final paper and short presentation are due

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95-96

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2011-2012 Undergraduate Catalog Page 98

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:

There is no text for this class.  All students will be required to access and read selected information from the eCollge companion course.

 

A sampling of the documents are listed below.
 


Attachments:
Journalism Handout

Network Diagrams

FCC

Freedom of Speech

Television

ChildrenandtheMedia.pdf

WOTWCommentary.pdf

Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
Outcomes
5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The final critically discusses four or more tenants of good broadcasting and Internet journalism The final critically discusses three tenants of good broadcasting and Internet journalism The final critically discusses one or two tenants of radio broadcasting and Internet journalism The final does not address tenants of good broadcasting and Internet journalism 
Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The final demonstrates student's ability to use four or more sources The final demonstrates student's ability to use three or more sources The final demonstrates student's ability to use one or two or more sources The final does not use outside sources. 
Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The final demonstrates student's ability to thoughtfully, creatively critique the mass media and its effect on society The final demonstrates student's ability to critique the mass media and its effect on society The final demonstrates student's ability to critique the mass media and its effect on society, but those ideas lack original thought The mass media critique is inconsistent with the assignment,  not original and/or not creative 
Application                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
3                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The final demonstrates student's ability to thoughtfully, creatively analyze the economic principles of  mass media The final demonstrates student's ability to thoughtfully analyze the economic principles of mass media The final demonstrates the student's ability only to regurgitate materials presented in class related to the economic principles of mass media The final does not demonstrate knowledge of materials presented in class related to the economic principles of mass media 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
1                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Final specifically addresses the questions, using strong evidence and statistics, and demonstrates a sophisticated understanding of mass media theory. Final is specifically address the questions, and demonstrates an understanding of mass media theory. Final addresses the questions but without specifics, and demonstrates a peripheral understanding of mass media theory. Final does not address the questions, and does not demonstrate any understanding of mass media or mass media theory. 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
5                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
The final is clearly and creatively written, is concise, and grammatically correct. The final is clearly written, is concise, and grammatically correct. The final is clear in most places, but occasionally wordy, and contains some grammatical and spelling errors. The final is unclear and wordy, and contains many grammatical and spelling errors. 
Disciplinary Literacy: FCC and Broadcasting                                                                                                                                                                                                                
Outcomes
2                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
On the final, students will precisely define and provide sophisticated, insightful analysis of the role of the FCC as it relates to broadcasting in general and specifically to indecency. On the final, students will define and insightfully analyze the role of the FCC as it relates to broadcasting in general and specifically to indecency. On the final, students will define and analyze the role of the FCC as it relates to broadcasting in general and specifically to indecency, though these definitions and analysis may be incomplete or only partially correct. Students will fail either to define or to analyze the role of the FCC as it relates to broadcasting in general and specifically to indecency; or, these definitions or analysis may be incorrect. 
Disciplinary Literacy: TV and Kids                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Outcomes
4                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
On the final, students will discuss and analyze, in a sophisticated manner, the role TV plays in children's lives, and develop insightful guidelines for their own children with regards to TV viewing. On the final, students will discuss and analyze the role TV plays in children's lives, and develop guidelines for their own children with regards to TV viewing. On the final, students will discuss and analyze the role TV plays in children's lives, and develop guidelines for their own children with regards to TV viewing; however, this discussion and analysis may be incomplete, or may be only a regurgitation from other sources. Students will fail to discuss the role TV plays in children's lives, or will provide only limited analysis, or will provide incorrect analysis indicating a lack of understanding of the subject. 

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Last Updated:12/3/2012 12:24:10 PM