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BI 340 Comparative Anatomy
Hoffman, Brian L.


Mission Statement: Park University provides access to a quality higher education experience that prepares a diverse community of learners to think critically, communicate effectively, demonstrate a global perspective and engage in lifelong learning and service to others.

Vision Statement: Park University, a pioneering institution of higher learning since 1875, will provide leadership in quality, innovative education for a diversity of learners who will excel in their professional and personal service to the global community.

Course

BI 340 Comparative Anatomy

Semester

SP 2013 HO

Faculty

Hoffman, Brian L.

Title

Professor of Biology

Degrees/Certificates

BA - Park College - Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics
PhD - St. Louis University - Cell and Molecular Biology

Office Location

SC 103

Office Hours

MW 9-11; TR 10-11:30; F 9-11:30; W 1:30-3:00

Daytime Phone

816-584-6477

E-Mail

brian.hoffman@park.edu

Semester Dates

January 14, 2013 - May 10, 2013

Class Days

--T-R--

Class Time

8:45 - 10:00 AM

Prerequisites

Bi 226.

Credit Hours

4


Textbook:

Kardong KV. 2012. Vertebrates. Comparative Anatomy, Function, and Evolution. 6th edition. McGraw Hill Publishers.

Kardong KV, EJ Zalisko. 2012. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy: A laboratory dissection guide. 6th edition. McGraw Hill Publishers.

 

Textbooks can be purchased through the Parkville Bookstore

Additional Resources:
Suggested Supplies - colored pencils, notebook for lab sketches

McAfee Memorial Library - Online information, links, electronic databases and the Online catalog. Contact the library for further assistance via email or at 800-270-4347.
Career Counseling - The Career Development Center (CDC) provides services for all stages of career development.  The mission of the CDC is to provide the career planning tools to ensure a lifetime of career success.
Park Helpdesk - If you have forgotten your OPEN ID or Password, or need assistance with your PirateMail account, please email helpdesk@park.edu or call 800-927-3024
Resources for Current Students - A great place to look for all kinds of information http://www.park.edu/Current/.


Course Description:
BI340 Comparative Anatomy: A study of the phylogeny and gross structure of the organ systems of the vertebrates. Major systems of the shark and cat are dissected and correlations are made with other groups of vertebrates. Prerequisite:BI226. 3:3:4

Educational Philosophy:

Learning Outcomes:
  Core Learning Outcomes

  1. Compare similarities and differences of organ systems of vertebrates, specifically the skin and its derivatives, bones, muscle, digestive system, respiratory system, circulatory system, urogenital system, and the nervous system.
  2. Exhibit proper dissection techniques and identification of anatomical structures of representative chordates.
  3. Analyze the fundamental principles, generalizations, and theories in vertebrate anatomy.
  4. Compare and contrast the anatomy of lower vertebrate forms to the human structure.


Core Assessment:

Each Comparative Anatomy student will complete a literature review and produce a formal paper, written in scientific method style and following the Harvard Method (CSE) of citation and referencing, that discusses the current understandings of a selected vertebrate anatomical system, structure or characteristic. This paper should compare the anatomy of the selected system, structure or characteristic within the different classes of vertebrates (i.e. fishes, amphibians, reptiles, aves, and mammals) addressing a minimum of three different classes, with specific emphasis placed upon how this system, structure, or characteristic relates to one’s understanding of the human organism.  The paper should be at least 10 pages in length but no more than 15 pages, excluding figures and literature cited.  A well-defined introduction, thesis statement, body (and sections within), and conclusion should be apparent. A minimum of 10 peer-reviewed articles are to be cited and referenced. 

Information covered in the paper should include:

1. Current evolutionary theory of the system, structure or characteristic being examined. (CLOs #1 & #3)

2. Anatomical description of the system, structure or characteristic being examined based upon one’s own work in the lab with similar species, as well as information from literature. (CLOs #1 & #2)

3. Discussion of ecological, genetic, developmental, physiologic, and/or behavioral aspects in regards to the system, structure or characteristic being emphasized. (CLO #3)

4. Analysis of how the selected system, structure or characteristic relates to the human organism. (CLO #4)

Link to Class Rubric

Class Assessment:
The teaching techniques utilized in this course include: traditional lectures by the instructor, small group discussions, and laboratory application of material learned in lecture. Student preparedness for lecture will be measured through the periodic administration of "pop" quizzes. The student's overall command of comparative anatomy will be measured with three regular examinations over lecture material. The examinations may be composed of short answer, matching and short essay problems.


Laboratory Procedure: First and foremost, I would like to emphasize some of the ethical considerations that must be made when dissecting vertebrates. As many of you are aware, there are people who object to the use of animals in teaching and research, and these uses even include the preserved specimens that you will be working on in this course. Please take some time to think about these issues and how they will impact your work in the lab. Primarily, I hope these ideas will influence how you approach your dissections. Be professional!

To reiterate this point, you are not on a “Search and Destroy” mission to find anatomical structures. Most of the dissection work in this course can be accomplished with a blunt probe, not a scalpel. Finally, your specimens will be used in the lab practicals, so neatness counts.  

Grading:
Lecture Exams 55% of grade

Quizzes 5% of grade
Paper 15% of grade
Dissections, pre-labs and lab practicals 25% of grade

The grading scale for this class is:

100-90 = A (4.0 honor points)
89+-80 = B (3.0 honor points)
79+-70 = C (2.0 honor points)
69+-60 = D (1.0 honor point)
Below 60 = F (no honor points)

Late Submission of Course Materials:
Homework is due at the start of the assigned class period. Homework turned in after roll is taken is late. Late homework will be reduced in credit by 25% for each day or part of day that the work is late. Students missing class due to participation in athletic or other school-sponsored events must turn in all homework PRIOR to their absence. Exceptions: students who miss class due to an extended illness requiring hospitalization will be allowed to make up missed homework assignments. Other cases may be considered at the discretion of the instructor.

Classroom Rules of Conduct:

A. Cellular Phones, Beepers, Other Communications Devices

While in class, the class should be your primary focus. Disruption of class due to communications devices has become so prevalent that they are a major distraction in class (to you, to the instructor and to other students). For this reason such devices must not be brought to class or must be inactivated during class (lecture and laboratory).  Students using personal devices for uses other than coursework (texting, social media, other courses) will lose the privilege of using such devices.   Phones and other personal media/communications devices must be stowed and inactivated during exams.  Violation of this policy will result in expulsion of the student from the examination and a score of zero, which may not be made up.

B. Student Alcohol or Drug Use

Because the classroom is a professional environment students who are suspected of being under the influence of alcohol or drugs will be removed from class. This also meets our legal obligation to provide a drug- and alcohol-free workplace. Such instances will be reported to the Vice-President for Academic Affairs. Students will not be admitted back into class unless such arrangements are made through the V.P. for Academic Affairs.

C. Student Work, Appointments...Etc.

The student who has signed up for the course has made an obligation to participate in those activities scheduled during regular class times. The student must not make other obligations during this time, or that student alone will be responsible for the consequences. The consequences may include reduced or no credit for that portion of the class and inability to make-up the missed work.

D. Withdrawals

The enrollment status of the student in this course is solely the responsibility of the student. If you wish to change your status in this course, be sure that you file the appropriate paperwork with the registrar before the appropriate deadlines. If you wish to drop, do not just stop coming to class!!! Two weeks of consecutive absences will result in your removal from the class. If you do not file withdrawal papers with the Registrar, you will receive an F in this course.

E. Extra Credit

It is your responsibility to get work done on time in an acceptable form. For this reason, no extra credit will be extended during the course of the semester.

F. Technology Issues

Computers make writing and revising much easier and more productive. Students must recognize though that technology can also cause problems. Printers run out of ink and hard drives crash. Students must be responsible for planning ahead and meeting deadlines in spite of technology. Be sure to save copies of your work to disk, hard drive, and print out paper copies for backup purposes. Papers will be submitted to the drop box in the eCompanion website for this course.

G. Make-Up Examinations

The student will be given the opportunity to make-up one examination during the course of the semester, provided that an adequate excuse is provided to the instructor within 24 hours of the missed examination. The instructor will be the final judge of what constitutes an adequate excuse. The makeup examination will be administered on Friday of finals week at 8:00 AM and will be a cumulative final.

If you miss one exam, it will be scored as a zero and included in your examination average. Missing two examinations will result in a grade of "F" for the course.  Students that fail to sit for the final examination will receive a grade of "F" for the course.  Three lecture examinations are scheduled for this semester. Your examination average will be calculated from all three test scores. If you feel that one test score is not representative of your effort, you may opt to take the make-up examination.  Failure to sit for the final examination will result in a grade of "F" for the course.

Exceptions:
 Athletes involved in sports contests or students participating in other school-sponsored events will be allowed to take the examination prior to the scheduled date. The instructor must be given prior notice of such an event.

H.  Homework, Studying for other Courses

Your focus while in this class is this class.  Performance of tasks for other courses during this one will not be tolerated.  Reading notes for other classes, doing homework for other classes is included.  Violation of this policy will result in expulsion of the student from the class for that lecture and an absence will for that lecture will be noted.

Course Topic/Dates/Assignments:
.

Dates

Topic

Reading

1/14-1/18

Introduction and Concepts and Chordate Origins

Ch 1&2

1/21-1/25

Chordate Origins cont. and Vertebrate Evolution

Ch 2&3

1/28-2/1

Integument

Ch 6

2/4-2/8

Dentition: Development and Anatomy

pgs. 506-516

2/11-2/15

Skeletal Elements

pg. 182-190 & Ch 7

2/18-2/22

Skeletal Elements

Ch 7, 8, 9

2/25-3/1

Vertebrate Locomotion

Ch 10

3/4-3/8

Biomechanics

Ch 10

3/18-3/22

Biomechanics

Ch 10

3/25-3/29

Hearts

Ch 12

4/1-4/5

Aortic Arches

Ch 12

4/8-4/12

Ventilation

Ch 11

4/15-4/19

Digestion

Ch 13

4/22-4/26

Urinary

Ch 14

4/29-5/3

Reproduction

Ch 14





Exam 1 - Feb 11 Ch 1,2,3,6
Exam 2 - Apr 1 Ch 7, 8, 9, 10
Exam 3 - May 9 Ch 11,12,13,14

Paper Topic due Feb 7
Annotated List with 5 references due March 1
Rough Draft (Essentially complete) April 5
Final Draft May 3

Academic Honesty:
Academic integrity is the foundation of the academic community. Because each student has the primary responsibility for being academically honest, students are advised to read and understand all sections of this policy relating to standards of conduct and academic life. Park University students and faculty members are encouraged to take advantage of the University resources available for learning about academic honesty (www.park.edu/current or http://www.park.edu/faculty/).from Park University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog Page 97

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism involves the use of quotations without quotation marks, the use of quotations without indication of the source, the use of another's idea without acknowledging the source, the submission of a paper, laboratory report, project, or class assignment (any portion of such) prepared by another person, or incorrect paraphrasing. from Park University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog Page 95

Attendance Policy:
Instructors are required to maintain attendance records and to report absences via the online attendance reporting system.

  1. The instructor may excuse absences for valid reasons, but missed work must be made up within the semester/term of enrollment.
  2. Work missed through unexcused absences must also be made up within the semester/term of enrollment, but unexcused absences may carry further penalties.
  3. In the event of two consecutive weeks of unexcused absences in a semester/term of enrollment, the student will be administratively withdrawn, resulting in a grade of "F".
  4. A "Contract for Incomplete" will not be issued to a student who has unexcused or excessive absences recorded for a course.
  5. Students receiving Military Tuition Assistance or Veterans Administration educational benefits must not exceed three unexcused absences in the semester/term of enrollment. Excessive absences will be reported to the appropriate agency and may result in a monetary penalty to the student.
  6. Report of a "F" grade (attendance or academic) resulting from excessive absence for those students who are receiving financial assistance from agencies not mentioned in item 5 above will be reported to the appropriate agency.

Park University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog Page 98
Attendance at all class meetings is mandatory. Part of the education of college is preparation for professional conduct. Attendance at work or graduate or professional school is mandatory for remaining employed or in school. Get in the habit of being here all of the time now. Education is also a cooperative effort. You are as responsible for furthering the education of your fellow classmates and the instructor as the instructor is for yours.

It is recognized that personal emergencies will arise during the course of the semester. Three absences (for any reason: illness, personal appointments, doctors appointments car problems...etc.) are allowed without penalty. After 3 absences, 5% will be deducted from the students grade for each subsequent absence. Eight absences is considered excessive, and the student missing eight classes will fail the course. Students who miss class will be responsible for the assignments made and material covered in that class period. Students who enter class after roll is taken will be counted tardy. Two tardies count as an absence. Students who are 15 minutes late (by my watch) will be counted absent.

Exceptions: Athletes who miss class for an athletic contest or students who miss class due to other school sponsored events will not be penalized IF AND ONLY IF THE INSTRUCTOR IS GIVEN TWO LECTURE MEETINGS PRIOR NOTICE AND WORK IS TURNED IN AND EXAMS TAKEN BEFORE THE CLASS IS MISSED!!!!!!!!!! If you have an illness that requires extended hospitalization, have someone contact me!

Disability Guidelines:
Park University is committed to meeting the needs of all students that meet the criteria for special assistance. These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal. It is Park University's policy to comply fully with federal and state law, including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding students with disabilities. In the case of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply. Additional information concerning Park University's policies and procedures related to disability can be found on the Park University web page: http://www.park.edu/disability .

Additional Information:










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Bibliography:



Rubric

CompetencyExceeds Expectation (3)Meets Expectation (2)Does Not Meet Expectation (1)No Evidence (0)
Evaluation/Analysis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Outcomes
(CLOs 1-4)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Addresses 4 or more vertebrate classes and including the human organism Addresses 3 vertebrate classes and including the human organism Addresses 1-2 vertebrate classes and including the human organism No evidence of operationally defined competency 
Application/Synthesis                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
Outcomes
(CLOs 1, 3, & 4)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
Discusses concepts from 6 or more peer reviewed sources to meet assignment requirements Discusses concepts from 3-5  peer reviewed sources to meet assignment requirements Discusses concepts from 4 or fewer peer reviewed sources to meet assignment requirements No evidence of operationally defined competency 
Content of Communication                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
Outcomes
(CLOs 1-4)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Exhibits exceptional usage of all vertebrate anatomical terminology used within the paper with no identified errors Exhibits proper usage of all vertebrate anatomical terminology used within the paper with 1-2 identified errors Exhibits usage of vertebrate anatomical terminology but makes 3-5 identifiable errors Exhibition of the use of vertebrate anatomical terminology but 6 or more factual errors 
Technical Skill in Communicating                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Outcomes
(CLOs 1-4)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
Exhibits 11 or more different citations & references from peer-reviewed sources Exhibits 10 different citations & references from peer-reviewed sources Exhibits 1-9 different citations & references from peer-reviewed sources No evidence of operationally defined competency 
Disciplinary Competency                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Outcomes
(CLOs 1 & 4)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Compares/contrasts the anatomical structure of the human organism to 4 other vertebrate types Compares/contrasts the anatomical structure of the human organism to 3 other vertebrate types Compares/contrasts the anatomical structure of the human organism to 1-2 other vertebrate types No evidence of operationally defined competency 
Disciplinary Competency                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
Outcomes
(CLOs 3 & 4)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
Compares/contrasts the fundamental principles, generalizations, and theories in vertebrate anatomy of the human organism to 4 other vertebrate types Compares/contrasts the fundamental principles, generalizations, and theories in vertebrate anatomy of the human organism to 3 other vertebrate types Compares/contrasts the fundamental principles, generalizations, and theories in vertebrate anatomy of the human organism to 1-2 other vertebrate types No evidence of operationally defined competency 

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Last Updated:1/21/2013 9:48:58 PM